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LIONS FINE UNAPOLOGETIC RAIOLA $7,500

The Detroit Lions have fined center Dominic Raiola $7,500 for flipping the bird to fans who were heckling the team during their loss to the Minnesota Vikings.
“We have tremendous respect and appreciation for all of our fans and we believe Dominic’s behavior this past Sunday was not consistent with what we expect from members of our team,” Lions Executive VP and COO Tom Lewand said. “Our players, coaches and staff are held to high standards of sportsmanship and conduct. We are disappointed with Dominic’s behavior and apologize to any fans who were offended by it.”
But while the Lions may be apologizing, Raiola isn’t. Appearing on Sporting News Radio, Raiola said he doesn’t think he should have to sit back and take it when fans are rude to him, and he encouraged fans who don’t like the team to stay home.
“You know, if you’re not happy, why are you coming to the game? I understand that they haven’t seen a winner in eight years, so don’t come. Don’t come until we turn it around,” Raiola said. “If they want me to be quiet and just take it … I don’t agree that I should do that.”
Raiola has been with the Lions since 2001, when he was part of Matt Millen’s inaugural draft class. The Lions are 31-94 since then, and their .248 winning percentage is the worst eight-year stretch in the NFL since 1950.

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34 Responses to “LIONS FINE UNAPOLOGETIC RAIOLA $7,500”
  1. BarkingTuna says: Dec 9, 2008 7:44 PM

    Dude doesn’t quite get the whole “professional” part of “professional athlete”, eh?

  2. ABROWNSFAN says: Dec 9, 2008 7:47 PM

    Hahahahaha…suck it, detroit

  3. ROMO4PRES says: Dec 9, 2008 7:55 PM

    How ’bout he doesn’t show up and get paid?
    Who would know.
    Never heard of him.
    If he’s looking for a reason why they’ve sucked for 8 years, he should look in the mirror.
    He’s probably eligible for a pension now.
    Maybe if they only paid him when they won, he’d give a sh*t like the fans do.

  4. CaptainFantastik says: Dec 9, 2008 7:58 PM

    Hey, at least somebody has the balls to say it. Being “professional” doesn’t always mean towing the company line until the bitter end when the sinking ship has slipped beneath the surface. Seriously, why would anybody pay NFL ticket prices to watch that? Team loyalty my ass. The only ones in Detroit with any sense are the ones that have already stopped going to the games. There is also a line that fans should not cross everybit as much as there are lines that players should not cross. Buying an NFL ticket doesn’t entitle one to the right of hurling nasty insults at these people without fear of reprisal. An NFL ticket is not a license to harrass people.

  5. titans_fan says: Dec 9, 2008 8:03 PM

    Dear Lions,
    This is why you suck. The fans, who paid good money to go to the game, who pay for him to have a job, are supposed to just accept them sucking? Yeah. To me this guy isn’t so different than Pacman or any other douchebag that plays. No class at all! He should be glad fans are actually willing to pay to see such garbage therefore giving him a job. I hope you enjoyed the gravy train cause your about to get off.

  6. jimicos says: Dec 9, 2008 8:06 PM

    BarkingTuna says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 7:44 pm
    Dude doesn’t quite get the whole “professional” part of “professional athlete”, eh?
    —————————–
    “Professional” does not mean inhuman. I agree completely with Raiola, and I like the fact that he won’t apologize. It shows backbone, and that’s something an 0-13 team needs. Fans like to think they’re entitled to engage in heckling and bad behavior because they paid to be there. They ought to act the same way they’d act if they ran into the player on the street. Odds are these douchebags would be a lot more polite if they were within his reach and talking to his face. Go ahead and boo poor performance or crappy play calling, but if you single a guy out and heckle him you ought to be prepared for him to react to it.

  7. garyofferdahl says: Dec 9, 2008 8:20 PM

    I remember a time John(John Offerdahl) was being heckled by a fan. Saying his bagels weren’t the freshest in town, John walked up to him and sliently handed him a complimentary coupon for one free bagel. That man that received that coupon was me,I legally changed my last name to “Offerdahl” because of the example he set and the rest is history.

  8. vincelombardi says: Dec 9, 2008 8:35 PM

    hey dumbass, if the fans don’t show up, who the hell you think is going to pay your inflated salary? what an uber asshead! pure genious, man the game is so much better these days…….

  9. BarkingTuna says: Dec 9, 2008 8:54 PM

    @ jimicos–
    What the hell do you mean by, ‘“Professional” does not mean inhuman.’ I didn’t say Raiola is inhuman. Are you referring to the fans as inhuman? You may note that I did not apply the term to any fans.
    I didn’t criticize the fans for not being “professional”, I criticized him for not acting the part.
    I do not condone what the fans did, and did not/do not defend their actions.
    But he is supposed to be a professional athlete. Responding the way he is is not professional.
    He has control over himself and how he chooses to respond–as we all do. He is supposed to be a professional. He is not behaving like one. Whether he’s right or not doesn’t mean a thing. He’s paid to be a professional–he should act like it.

  10. jimicos says: Dec 9, 2008 9:01 PM

    vincelombardi says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 8:35 pm
    hey dumbass, if the fans don’t show up, who the hell you think is going to pay your inflated salary? what an uber asshead! pure genious, man the game is so much better these days…….
    —————————–
    I see the offending fans have sent a representative. What a lame argument that is. By that regard, the fans should be able to do anything they want at the games. Piss in the aisle, puke over the railing onto the sidelines, anything goes. Hell, non-ticket owning taxpayers should be allowed to hold private parties in the luxury boxes because they paid for the stadium, right?
    Is there no more expectation of manners? How about in golf? Can you show up at a PGA tour event and verbally abuse Phil Mickelson? Why’s it different at an NFL game?

  11. BarkingTuna says: Dec 9, 2008 9:08 PM

    It shows backbone, and that’s something an 0-13 team needs.
    =======
    Seriously… they can’t win a game on the field, so you’re giving the guy kudos for standing up to a fan? Did you really just say that an 0-13 team needs to attack their fans? And here I was thinking they needed to show backbone in the games on the field, but what do I know…

  12. BarkingTuna says: Dec 9, 2008 9:18 PM

    Is there no more expectation of manners? How about in golf? Can you show up at a PGA tour event and verbally abuse Phil Mickelson? Why’s it different at an NFL game?
    ———
    But it would be OK for Phil Mickelson to verbally abuse the fans? To flip them off? To challenge them to come to his house so he can beat them up? (which isn’t mentioned in this article, but was brought up on Jim Rome today.)
    There is no excuse for fans behaving like idiots. I am amazed, however, that the same people that criticize the fans for poor behavior defend the same kind of behavior by the athlete. Both are wrong, but the athlete is supposed to be a paid professional, and part of being a professional is not responding to things like this.

  13. titans_fan says: Dec 9, 2008 9:25 PM

    “By that regard, the fans should be able to do anything they want at the games. Piss in the aisle, puke over the railing onto the sidelines, anything goes.”
    That’s the most retarded thing I’ve ever heard. Seriously. There’s a big difference between booing and being unruly. If you are that sensitive, and if he’s that sensitive, then maybe football isn’t for you. Maybe you should look into another way to pass your time and he should look into another way to make a living. Everybody that signs a NFL contract knows (or should know) that with that big check comes the possibility of getting booed for sucking. Hey fans will cheer when they do well, boo when they don’t work… that’s just how it works.
    Anyways, what a bunch of retards! I’m thinking if its such a big problem they should put a disclaimer on the tickets about the consequences for booing.

  14. jollyoldman says: Dec 9, 2008 9:38 PM

    @ ABROWNSFAN;
    Raiola must have thought he was playing for Cleveland. He was simply following Savages’ lead.

  15. cincyeaglefan says: Dec 9, 2008 9:43 PM

    I don’t blame the guy. Some of the things people say (more then likely posters in this column as well) are asinine. Cursing, throwing stuff, etc. All for a football game?
    I agree with him, if you don’t like it, don’t show up. But if you’re going to act a freaking fool, don’t expect some one to sit there and take it. ESPECIALLY since you’ll be the same one pissing in your pants if he came up into the stands on your ass.

  16. AFKfootball says: Dec 9, 2008 9:55 PM

    Thanks to jjmicos for the only intelligent comment on this posting.

  17. KNON2000 says: Dec 9, 2008 9:55 PM

    Booing is fine, you are voicing your displeasure for the team, and the game as it is being played. Nothing, and I do mean NOTHING is wrong with voicing yourself like that. However, to start to heckle a player is honestly crossing the line of poor sportsmanship. If you are singling out a player for any reason, and “letting them have it”, you are calling them out. Questioning there manhood and all. I don’t understand the need to get that personal with someone. Heck, what possible reason is there for that? Does it make the heckler feel better knowing that he got the players attention? I don’t understand the mindset. I have not liked several players thru the years, and have jeered when they made a poor play, but jeering is a long, long ways away from heckling. Riola definitely didn’t handle it right, but does it excuse the root cause? The Lions front office should be fining themselves for putting such a crappy product on the field. If anyone needs to be ashamed of themselves, it is the people that actually brought the product to Detroit to begin with. Geez, we are looking at a winless season, the worst season EVER. I am honestly surprised ANY Lions fans are even going at this point.

  18. Sprint_DA says: Dec 9, 2008 9:56 PM

    The Lions need to cut anyone who has been with the team for more than a year or two. Start over completely from scratch with new people from the front office down (unfortunately you can’t force a change in ownership). Let them rebuild like a new franchise. Everyone else has had to much time in this loosing culture.

  19. titans_fan says: Dec 9, 2008 10:03 PM

    If you’re gonna tell them not to boo then you should tell them not to cheer

  20. mborz says: Dec 9, 2008 10:21 PM

    It’s not cool to heckle players. However….
    Just like others have said – if it’s not right for the fans to act like idiots, then it’s equally wrong (if not more so) for a player to act like one, and that’s exactly what Raiola did. Whether he was provoked or not doesn’t matter.
    With the Lions being so bad for so long, I’d think the last thing they need is anyone from any level in that organization inviting people not to show up.

  21. TheTylerRose-BestEver says: Dec 9, 2008 10:26 PM

    titans-fan
    You are right on with everything you have stated.
    Go fight the fans, Raiola you jackass. That really worked out well for the NBA.
    How does this moron react when players on the other team taunt him? Or does everyone posting here think that players are perfect gentlemen on the field and would never trash talk.
    Fight one of your opponents next time, Dom, and maybe that might do something to help you team…fighting your fans will definitely not. I am going to go out on a limb and guess that Dom did not graduate from any Ivy League school…

  22. screamingidiot says: Dec 9, 2008 10:56 PM

    You can’t blame the guy. If I was a Lion fan I would give myself the finger.

  23. jimicos says: Dec 9, 2008 11:18 PM

    OK, I’ll respond in order..
    —————————–
    BarkingTuna says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 8:54 pm
    @ jimicos–
    What the hell do you mean by, ‘“Professional” does not mean inhuman.’ I didn’t say Raiola is inhuman.
    ——————————
    I didn’t mean to imply that you said he’s inhuman.. I meant that it’s expecting him to act inhumanly to just absorb verbal abuse from the drunk idiots who feel entitled to do it. No single player on that team is responsible for the team being 0-13. And no single player on the team should be expected to withstand incessant insults from 15 feet behind him without a reaction.
    I guarantee Raiola’s position would look a lot more reasonable if he revealed some of the sh!t he has to listen to.
    ——————————-
    BarkingTuna says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 9:08 pm
    Seriously… they can’t win a game on the field, so you’re giving the guy kudos for standing up to a fan? Did you really just say that an 0-13 team needs to attack their fans? And here I was thinking they needed to show backbone in the games on the field, but what do I know…
    ——————————-
    Let’s be clear about this. He’s not attacking the fans. He’s listened to their insults for an awful long time, and now he’s responding. There’s a difference between Raiola and acting like some asshat going off on the fans out of nowhere. I understand his position. I think it’s unreasonable to expect him NOT to react at some point.
    ——————————-
    BarkingTuna says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 9:18 pm
    But it would be OK for Phil Mickelson to verbally abuse the fans? To flip them off? To challenge them to come to his house so he can beat them up? (which isn’t mentioned in this article, but was brought up on Jim Rome today.)
    There is no excuse for fans behaving like idiots. I am amazed, however, that the same people that criticize the fans for poor behavior defend the same kind of behavior by the athlete. Both are wrong, but the athlete is supposed to be a paid professional, and part of being a professional is not responding to things like this.
    ——————————-
    If Phil Mickleson had to endure years (I’m guessing) of heckling from drunken idiots at tour events.. I think you’d see some kind of response. It’s only natural.
    In theory I agree with your second paragraph quoted above. But that only applies in limited spans. Look at how bad the Lions have been for the last 8 years. You think this is an isolated occurrance? I’ll bet he gets to listen to the same jackasses week in and week out, possibly year in and year out. This is a case of a guy who has probably acted like a paid professional for 7 years and now he’s fed up. As for his comments about mixing it up with the fans… He’s simply telling it like it is. These pricks behind the bench have plenty to say when there’s an eight foot cement wall, a whole bunch of security and anonymity on their side. As I said earlier, they should act the same way they’d act if they saw him on the street.
    ——————————-
    titans_fan says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 9:25 pm
    That’s the most retarded thing I’ve ever heard. Seriously. There’s a big difference between booing and being unruly. If you are that sensitive, and if he’s that sensitive, then maybe football isn’t for you. Maybe you should look into another way to pass your time and he should look into another way to make a living. Everybody that signs a NFL contract knows (or should know) that with that big check comes the possibility of getting booed for sucking. Hey fans will cheer when they do well, boo when they don’t work… that’s just how it works.
    Anyways, what a bunch of retards! I’m thinking if its such a big problem they should put a disclaimer on the tickets about the consequences for booing.
    ——————————-
    I’m pretty sure he’s not this upset about “booing.” I’d really like to hear the exchanges between him and the fans. Then we’d have a better understanding of the scope. As for the sensitivity comment, I’ll just go back to what I said above in this post.. It’s simply not natural to allow someone else to yell at you and attack you for three hours week after week, year after year without responding. It doesn’t have anything to do with being “professional.” It has everything to do with human nature and reaching your breaking point.
    Honestly, I think the real idiots are the fans who are willing to put up good money to continue to go see this team. You vote with your dollars, not your voice. Don’t buy the tickets, brainiac. As long as they’re selling tickets they’re paying player salaries. An empty stadium is what convinces the owner that there’s a problem.
    ——————————-
    TheTylerRose-BestEver says:
    December 9th, 2008 at 10:26 pm
    Go fight the fans, Raiola you jackass. That really worked out well for the NBA.
    ——————————-
    So you’d say the idiot fan who dumped his drink on Ron Artest was justified? I’m not going to say Artest was right to go into the stands and start a brawl, but don’t you think that one guy thought he was protected when he threw his cup? He found out real fast that everyone has a breaking point. Artest’s breaking point just happens to be much closer to the surface.
    ——————————-
    TheTylerRose-BestEver says:
    I am going to go out on a limb and guess that Dom did not graduate from any Ivy League school…
    ——————————-
    As if you couldn’t make that guess in regards to any NFL player. Raiola went to Nebraska. His little brother Donovan went to Wisconsin. Dominic was actually a two-time academic All-Big 12 selection. I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that you also didn’t graduate from an Ivy League school.

  24. jimicos says: Dec 9, 2008 11:22 PM

    For the record I’m a Packers fan, not a Lions fan. I just wanted to clear that up before anyone thinks I’m just defending one of my favorite players or something.

  25. ButchD says: Dec 9, 2008 11:31 PM

    I think he is just trying to get a quick ticket out of town in the offseason

  26. brauneyz says: Dec 9, 2008 11:57 PM

    Yeah, he’s an uber asshead. Well done, vincelombardi. Never heard of the dude before. Some accomplishment…

  27. WhoDey08 says: Dec 10, 2008 7:38 AM

    “If they want me to be quiet and just take it … I don’t agree that I should do that.”
    So this assbag thinks he should not have to be quiet and take ti but expects the fans to do just that?

  28. Kemp says: Dec 10, 2008 7:52 AM

    As someone who has loved the Lions longer than Dominic Raiola has been alive, I must agree with him on at least one point … none of us should go to another game until they turn it around.

  29. BarkingTuna says: Dec 10, 2008 10:54 AM

    Let’s be clear about this. He’s not attacking the fans. He’s listened to their insults for an awful long time, and now he’s responding. There’s a difference between Raiola and acting like some asshat going off on the fans out of nowhere. I understand his position. I think it’s unreasonable to expect him NOT to react at some point.
    ==========
    He was talking about giving out his home address so the fans could come over and fight him on the radio yesterday….
    Being paid as a professional, one should act professionally. That means not responding to what the fans dish out.
    A CEO, a lawyer, an accountant that responded to a critic, client, or paying customer in such a way couldn’t get away with it, nor would they be defended in doing so. If we’re going to call them professional athletes, I expect them to act accordingly.

  30. BarkingTuna says: Dec 10, 2008 10:57 AM

    =======
    There is no excuse for fans behaving like idiots. I am amazed, however, that the same people that criticize the fans for poor behavior defend the same kind of behavior by the athlete. Both are wrong, but the athlete is supposed to be a paid professional, and part of being a professional is not responding to things like this.
    =======
    In theory I agree with your second paragraph quoted above. But that only applies in limited spans.
    ========
    There’s nothing theoretical about it, that’s the difference between professional and non. It goes with the territory. They’re expected to deal with it. That’s professionalism.
    Criticizing the asinine actions of a paying customer, while defending similar actions by a paid professional doesn’t make sense on any level.

  31. jimicos says: Dec 10, 2008 11:31 AM

    Not that I believe anyone is still reading these comments (gotta change the layout, Florio) Kevin Seifert had a note on his NFCN blog on ESPN.com about this. I thought he accurately addressed both sides. Now I’ll quote the part that suits my needs. ;)
    “Raiola has been with the team since 2001 and has probably been subjected to more fan abuse per capita than any other player in the NFL. That’s far worse punishment, we reasoned, than anything the NFL could do.”

    “It’s just too bad to see Raiola singled out for making a statement, albeit crude, that genuinely expressed the diseased condition in Detroit. I don’t think there are going to be many fans who feel “better” knowing Raiola was fined. The Lions need to encourage honesty, not suppress it.”
    http://myespn.go.com/blogs/nfcnorth/0-6-312/Dominic-Raiola–This-week-s-scapegoat-in-Detroit.html

  32. jimicos says: Dec 10, 2008 12:26 PM

    BarkingTuna says:
    December 10th, 2008 at 10:54 am
    A CEO, a lawyer, an accountant that responded to a critic, client, or paying customer in such a way couldn’t get away with it, nor would they be defended in doing so. If we’re going to call them professional athletes, I expect them to act accordingly.
    ——————————-
    You find me a CEO, a lawyer or an accountant who is expected to absorb this abuse without responding. Then we can compare. The bottom line is that a CEO, lawyer or accountant would have a restraining order put on you if you went down to their place of business and verbally abused them weekly. So your comparison is flawed. Or better yet, try this. Attend a game and just pick out a guy in front of you or next to you. Yell obscenities and insults at him for the entire game. Note his response. Repeat weekly for several years. Come back and we’ll discuss it.
    I won’t say that Raiola is correct to handle it exactly the way he chose, but I think it’s unreasonable to expect no response from anyone under those conditions.
    ——————————-
    BarkingTuna says:
    December 10th, 2008 at 10:57 am
    Criticizing the asinine actions of a paying customer, while defending similar actions by a paid professional doesn’t make sense on any level.
    ——————————-
    Similar actions? Point out to me where he incessantly yelled insults at fans. Point out to me where he hid behind a cement wall in order to abuse someone. That’s what these fans are doing. It’s like taunting the tiger at the zoo. You only do it because (1) you’re a d!ckhead with severe emotional problems and (2) you’re confident that the cage will hold the tiger. As soon as the tiger is roaming free (like Ron Artest in Detroit), people start shutting the hell up.
    If I were in the Lions organization I’d be encouraged to find a player who’s fed up with losing, fed up with taking abuse and willing to stand up for himself. I’d fine him for his actions, but I’d be encouraged to see that there’s at least one guy whose will hasn’t been broken.

  33. BarkingTuna says: Dec 10, 2008 1:44 PM

    ———–
    jimicos says:
    December 10th, 2008 at 12:26 pm
    You find me a CEO, a lawyer or an accountant who is expected to absorb this abuse without responding. Then we can compare. The bottom line is that a CEO, lawyer or accountant would have a restraining order put on you if you went down to their place of business and verbally abused them weekly. So your comparison is flawed. Or better yet, try this. Attend a game and just pick out a guy in front of you or next to you. Yell obscenities and insults at him for the entire game. Note his response. Repeat weekly for several years. Come back and we’ll discuss it.
    I won’t say that Raiola is correct to handle it exactly the way he chose, but I think it’s unreasonable to expect no response from anyone under those conditions.
    ————————
    Find me a CEO, lawyer, or accountant (ie, a professional) that wouldn’t be fired for berating their paying customers, flipping them the bird in public, or inviting them to their house so they could beat them up. Go ahead. They don’t, because people that achieve high levels of success know the proper way to deal with situations like this.
    Your comparison is flawed in that people in these professions don’t sell tickets to see them perform publicly. They all deal with adversity–can you imagine the abuse you’d find in an oil company’s CEO’s inbox right now? I guarantee a CEO doesn’t flip off the board, or berate the attendees at a shareholder meeting. A lawyer doesn’t do it to the jury or the judge or the prosecutor. Etc…
    Point remains, professionals should behave professionally. There is no moral equivalency in stooping to the level of your critics.
    ———–
    jimicos says:
    Similar actions? Point out to me where he incessantly yelled insults at fans. Point out to me where he hid behind a cement wall in order to abuse someone. That’s what these fans are doing. It’s like taunting the tiger at the zoo. You only do it because (1) you’re a d!ckhead with severe emotional problems and (2) you’re confident that the cage will hold the tiger. As soon as the tiger is roaming free (like Ron Artest in Detroit), people start shutting the hell up.
    ———–
    Yes, behaving in kind. Flipping off the fans. Not being able to control his reponse in the media. Inviting fans to his home so he can beat them up.
    You keep pointing out what the fans are doing. I’ve already said several times I don’t condone it. It still does not justify Raiola’s behavior. You want to talk about taunting tigers… see, there’s a key difference that separates us as human beings from the animals–we are not stimulus–>response creatures. We are able to think and choose a course of action in that gap between stimulus and response. I simply expect someone who calls himself a professional to behave like one. You, apparently, do not.
    —————–
    jimicos says:
    If I were in the Lions organization I’d be encouraged to find a player who’s fed up with losing, fed up with taking abuse and willing to stand up for himself. I’d fine him for his actions, but I’d be encouraged to see that there’s at least one guy whose will hasn’t been broken.
    ——————
    Good for you. While you’re encouraged to see an NFL athlete go after those big, mean fans, I would encourage him to direct his attention to the opponents on the field, and not his paying customers (call me crazy, but when a guy’s job is to play football, I’ll measure his will and backbone by how he does on the field.) If I were in the Lions organization, I’d be looking for players that showed on the field that they were sick of losing by, oh, I don’t know… doing something to win a game, maybe? I might even be looking to get rid of people that were telling customers to stay home and threatening to beat them up. If that kind of behavior is alright with you, and is an adequate substitute for winning, more power to ya… but I disagree.

  34. jimicos says: Dec 10, 2008 2:29 PM

    Again, I don’t think this has anything to do with being a paid professional. It has everything to do with human nature. I don’t condone Raiola’s chosen response, but I fully understand his frustration. Personally, I think the team should be responsible for removing – and revoking the season tickets of – fans who display such behavior. The manager down at your local McDonald’s wouldn’t allow a customer to berate the cashier like that, regardless of how long it took to get the meal or how cold your fries were. He’d attempt to satisfy the customer and then have them removed if the behavior continued.
    I’m willing to give Raiola a little bit of leeway in that I expect this abuse has been coming weekly from the same idiots for a long time. If this were literally the first time he’s been criticized that’d be totally different.
    As to your example of the Oil exec’s inbox… Please. According to Exxon’s website their CEO is Rex W. Tillerson. Do you honestly believe:
    - That Exxon makes his email address public?
    - If they do make it public, that there’s no filter to remove all the crap he doesn’t want to see?
    You wouldn’t have a snowball’s chance in hell of getting a message through to him, let alone dozens or hundreds of derogatory messages regarding the price or quality of his product, let alone personally attacking emails. If you were successful in getting a number of those messages through to his personal inbox, you’d probably receive a message from his lawyers.
    The abuse that some NFL players (and other pro athletes) are exposed to is beyond the pale. The excuse that “They’re professional,” or that “The fans paid to express their opinions,” is just a cop out. In my opinion, sports teams and/or leagues should attempt to curb this excessively abusive behavior. There’s nothing wrong with voicing your displeasure, but when it becomes a recurrent, constant derogatory thing it needs to be stopped.
    Why is it that behavior that would get you a black eye on the sidewalk or the subway is perfectly permissible inside a stadium?
    @Kemp: I agree completely, and I feel for Lions fans. If you’re so disgusted with the team’s performance, why are you there weekly to yell yourself blue in the face? Do your blood pressure and your wallet a favor and stay home.

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