Common NFL Term Crossing Over To The Mainstream?

So we were watching the pilots last night of Parks & Recreation and Southland (our guess is that the producers of each show already received a call from Rita Kierson advising them that NBC is passing), and we heard for the first time anywhere other than in NFL parlance a term that we’ve heard in NFL parlance for years.
The term in question is “slapdick.”  As John Feinstein points out in Next Man Up, “Anyone who is anything less than brilliant at his or her job is, in the world according to [former Ravens coach Brian] Billick, a ‘slapdick’ — or ‘a slappy,’ for short.”
And it’s not just Billick.  Everyone in and around the league is familiar with the term, and any non-slapdick knows how and when to properly use it.
So when one cop used the term “slapdick” while talking to another cop in what likely will be remembered as a slapdick show, we smiled with the knowledge that the term we first heard back in 2001 has finally left the NFL nest.
So fly, you little slapdick.  Fly.

29 responses to “Common NFL Term Crossing Over To The Mainstream?

  1. Thanks for the vocab lesson. Let me see if I have this down:
    “Mangenius may be a whiz kid as an OC, but now that he and that turd have paired up to make ManKok he’s looking like a regular slapdick.”

  2. Slapdick sounds like a defensive maneuver used to incapacitate your opponent at the snap. Kinda like in Necessary Roughness when the whole football team just beats the crap out of the opponents.
    Down
    Set
    hut hut HUT (insert slapdick here)

  3. When I win the QBF Friday contest and you write your witty inscription, can you please sign it “Sincerely, Slapdick”. Thanks.

  4. “So fly, you little slapdick. Fly.” That’s what she said.
    @ SportsSimpleton
    I was thinking Jeff Garcia.

  5. Slapdick has been a great phrase for any waste of manhood as far back as the late 80’s. It was an actual nickname for one of the more useless guys on my college rugby team back in ’89.
    I’m very proud that I eventually got my wife to use it as her go to name for one of her co-workers that thinks he’s the bomb but is completely and utterly incompetent but a world class schmoozer. Now the other ladies she works with call him that too.

  6. BUZZBISSENGER: “Um, the guys at my work, (whom by the way have absolutly no interest in the NFL) have been using that phrase for years”
    Learn how to use the word “whom” properly, slapdick.

  7. Amen buzz…the only place I’ve heard that term other than the NFL is..grade school, middle school, high school, college, work, traffic, from my brothers…oh, and from basically every woman I’ve ever dated…

  8. Parks & Recreation, Southland, and Rescue Me!? You have bad taste in shows. Watch 24 & Breaking Bad.

  9. Billick actually learned that phrase from Charles Nelson Reilly backstage on the set of the “Match Game”.
    – I don’t think it meant the same thing back then.

  10. “Anyone who is anything less than brilliant at his or her job is, in the world according to [former Ravens coach Brian] Billick, a ’slapdick’ — or ‘a slappy,’ for short.”
    By his own estimation then, that would make Mr. Billick a….SLAPDICK!

  11. “Anyone who is anything less than brilliant at his or her job is, in the world according to [former Ravens coach Brian] Billick, a ’slapdick’ — or ‘a slappy,’ for short.”
    So, what does that make Mr. Billick?
    Clearly, a slapdick!!!

  12. @theVIC:
    Cut and pasted from my dictionary:
    introduces relative clause: used to introduce a relative clause giving information about a person or people
    Birch and her colleagues studied 162 infants, none of whom were born prematurely.
    looks like proper usage to me, balls in your court, slapdick.

  13. Yeah, sure, genius. Because “…studied 162 infants, none of whom were born prematurely.” is the same as “Um, the guys at my work, (whom by the way have absolutly no interest in the NFL)…”.
    If you insist on shoehorning the word WHOM into your writing, you might want to rephrase it as “the guys at my work, none of whom have an interest in football”.
    You’ve been measured and found wanting, slapdick.

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