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Dungy Confirms He'll Be Visiting Vick

In a Thursday interview with Dan Patrick, former Buccaneers and Colts coach Tony Dungy confirmed that he’ll soon be visiting imprisoned Falcons quarterback Mike Vick.
Dungy was reluctant to identify the date of the visit or the person(s) who arranged it, but he seemed to imply in response to a question from Patrick that the meeting was instigated by Vick’s camp.
Dungy said that he’ll talk to Vick about “life and the Lord,” and the challenges Vick will face once he’s released from federal custody. 
“I’ll talk to him like he’s my son,” Dungy said.
Though Dungy didn’t take a position on whether Vick should be reinstated, the body of his remarks suggests to us that he thinks Vick should get a second chance.
For example, Dungy doesn’t seem to agree with Commissioner Roger Goodell’s position that Vick needs to show “genuine remorse” for his behavior.
“I’m sure he’s remorseful,” Dungy said.  “I don’t know that that’s gotta be the standard.”
Dungy also said that he’d sign Vick if based on looking in his eyes and divining what’s in his heart Dungy concludes that he’s worthy of another chance.  And Dungy explained that a team shouldn’t give Vick another opportunity because of his skills, but because “it’s the right thing to do.”
Dungy said that he did just that with kicker Mike Vanderjagt, who publicly slammed Dungy and quarterback Peyton Manning.  Dungy met with Vanderjagt, and decided to keep him around.
We agreed with most of what Dungy said about Vick, and we think that if Dungy’s involvement is something that Vick’s camp arranged, it’s a stroke of genius.  Dungy is one of the most influential voices in the sport, and if Dungy is using his voice to support Vick, his chances of getting back in are improved.
That said, we must take issue with the portion of the segment during which Dungy seemed to not understand the difference between guys like Leonard Little, who took the life of a human being while driving drunk, and the fighting of dogs, the gambling ring surrounding it, and the killing of dogs deemed unfit to die in the pit.
Here’s how we explained the difference on March 28:

“Little (and possibly [Donte’] Stallworth) engaged in criminally reckless actions.  They didn’t intend to harm anyone.  Little’s crime (and possibly Stallworth’s) was to drink to excess under circumstances that did not prevent him from exercising impaired judgment by getting behind the wheel of a 2,000-pound sculpted block of rolling steel.

“Vick intentionally, deliberately, and soberly embarked on a hobby that violated multiple federal and state laws, and that was premised on the cold-blooded torture and killing of dogs.

“And then he lied about his conduct, to anyone who wanted to know the truth.  He even tried to deceive about the killing of underperforming dogs after pleading guilty, and while strapped to a polygraph.”

Those remarks came in response to comments from Bears coach Lovie Smith, who has said he supports Vick’s reinstatement.  Given the long-time friendship between Smith and Dungy, it’s hardly a stretch to conclude that, in time, Dungy will be officially taking the same position.
Then again, if Dungy emerges from his visit with Vick and says “no comment,” the fair inference is that he looked into Vick’s eyes and saw that his only regret is that he got caught.
Hopefully, Dungy will keep his mind — and his eyes — open for precisely such an observation.

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85 Responses to “Dungy Confirms He'll Be Visiting Vick”
  1. olcap says: Apr 30, 2009 11:17 AM

    I’m truly saddened that Dungy would allow himself to be used in this way by Vick and his handlers. This is exactly what it obviously is: a ploy to garner sympathy and to make people believe that, because Dungy will say that in his view, Vick is showing genuine remorse, which Dungy has already indicated that 1. he doesn’t believe is necessary for Vick to get another shot, and 2. that Dungy already believes Vick is remourseful without even having talked to him.
    This is all a setup to make it easier for “Don” Goodell to reinstate Vick almost immediately when his house arrest period is over in July.

  2. GoSabes says: Apr 30, 2009 11:19 AM

    Nice play here… I’m with Dungy (seemingly) in thinking that Vick deserves a 2nd chance. No better person to have in your court than Tony Dungy.
    What a fantastic man and hopefully he is able to have some meaningful impact on this man…
    P.S…. Not opposed to the 49ers signing him!

  3. Darth Ringo says: Apr 30, 2009 11:22 AM

    I don’t know about “stroke of genius” — it’s definitely a stroke of common sense for Vick to try to appeal to a man of Tony Dungy’s stature & influence.
    But this: “Dungy explained that a team shouldn’t give Vick another opportunity because of his skills, but because “it’s the right thing to do.””
    When has that EVER been the standard for signing a player??

  4. F00kFl0ri0 says: Apr 30, 2009 11:24 AM

    I didn’t intend to slap my wife and kids around when I got home, but after having one too many drinks and because of the pressure of work, along with the added pressure of one of my girlfriends, I embarked on a reckless path of slapping the shit out of everyone in my path….. I didn’t harm the dog though, so I should be cool right? I mean yeah, my wife has a broken arm and her eye is now the size of Texas, but it wasn’t my intent on shutting her up with my fists… Now my kids will be traumatized, but they will always have it in their memory that Daddy didn’t kick the dog…..

  5. BAMBAM3K says: Apr 30, 2009 11:26 AM

    So tired about hearing about the lives of these D@mn Dogs…Legally your guys are correct so I won’t argue that point. But it would seem that these other 2 gentlemen got a second chance after vehicular manslaughter which the life of a HUMAN BEING was taken Vick should definetly be given a second chance hell if Pac Man Jones got it and becuase of his actions that he was not directly apart of left a man paralyzed tehn VIck should have a second chance. Don’t get me wrong even without this controversy I never thought Vick would be this great QB anyway but he should be allowed to play football. AND please everyone STOP IT with the DOGS…Dungy has every right as a TRUE Christian man to talk to Vick and help him straighten out his life that is what being a TRUE Christian is all about

  6. GeauxSaints12 says: Apr 30, 2009 11:27 AM

    Having Dungy by your side will help but Vick is going to need a little bit more in order for him the get back in the leauge.

  7. coltsfaninthepeg says: Apr 30, 2009 11:28 AM

    Dungy is no sucker, folks. Just because he is a man of faith does not mean he will turn off his critical thinking when he meets with Vick. Michael Vick has done some bad stuff–for sure. Tony Dungy knows that.
    Also, Tony has volunteered in prisons for a while and knows how to read a convict looking for sympathy better than someone who is just shooting off from the outside. I would be willing to bet that no one posting/writing here can do the job–including myself.

  8. houskat says: Apr 30, 2009 11:30 AM

    Let’em play!!!!!!!!! :)

  9. hayward giablommi says: Apr 30, 2009 11:31 AM

    Ugh, as far as I’m concerned you can throw Dungy in with Favre into the “how can we miss you if you won’t GO AWAY” category.
    Personally, I am sick of hearing from (and about) this self righetous NARCISSIST. It amazing to me that these two underachieving phonies(Favre and Dungy) always seem to know when a TV camera or microphone is near. The fact that Dungy has so underachieved in his coaching careers is masked by the fact that he knows how to smooth talk the media into thinking he such a great guy. I’m not buying it.

  10. SirSuperSouthern says: Apr 30, 2009 11:35 AM

    Don’t fool yourselves into thinking Dungy is just automatically going to give Vick the thumbs up. Men of great integrity and class such as Dungy aren’t as easily manipulated as some of you may think.
    Sure, he’s a nice guy and knows that Vick really is sad that he lost two seasons and tens of millions of dollars – who wouldn’t sincerely regret all that? But Dungy is going in to conduct an unbiased soul probe, and if he smells a rat he won’t put his credibility behind Vick. He won’t lie to the commissioner or his own heart by backing somebody he believes is a turd just because his pal Lovie has a man-crush on Mike.
    In all honesty, if Dungy comes away with good things to say, I myself might think better of Vick. Until then though, my opinion of the man couldn’t possibly be lower, and I would instantly hate any team that actually gave that man money to play football again…

  11. dlmcc0505 says: Apr 30, 2009 11:36 AM

    I dont know why Dungy has to get involved but whatever you know. Goodell will eventually let him back in the league but what team is going to want to sign a loser like this who was a below average QB in the league? Its not worth the P.R nightmare it would be. All your getting a QB who can’t throw the ball accurately and whos legs are no longer that young

  12. EverybodyGotAIDS says: Apr 30, 2009 11:36 AM

    “I’ll talk to him like he’s my son,” Dungy said.
    —————————
    ummm…..errr…….

  13. Shaun Lowrie says: Apr 30, 2009 11:37 AM

    I agree 100% with Dungy. Remorse is not a quantifiable feeling. It is subjective and would never be the same for any two people.
    I also think that putting this guy back into the world and saying ‘to hell with you’ would be the wrong message for the league to send out to millions of fans. Vick has served time, but ruining his life should not be high on the league’s ‘to do’ list.
    And I hated Vick as a player, so don’t think I’m some apologist.

  14. darth_vincent says: Apr 30, 2009 11:39 AM

    I want Vick re-instated too… I can’t wait for all the doggie treats and bones that thousands of people are going to mail to him and throw at him during the games… I can’t wait to hear the post-game press conference when he’s asked if “throwing that winning TD was just as exciting at watching your dawg tear that bitch apart and win a fight to the death”. I can’t wait for the PR Nightmare that awaits any team that even hints that there interested in him…
    Vick is a tool… and Dungy is too, if he’s trying to get him back into the NFL.
    **** I worked in animal hospitals for 15 years of my life ****

  15. descendency says: Apr 30, 2009 11:39 AM

    When is Ray Lewis meeting with Dungy?

  16. budchase666 says: Apr 30, 2009 11:40 AM

    Talk to him like he’s his son……….. ? Are we sure that really the best idea?

  17. Jux says: Apr 30, 2009 11:43 AM

    Please stop making Vick sound like he committed a more heinous act than Little (and potentially Stallworth), or that a dogs life is worth more than a human. No one will condone what Vick did, but at no point were humans at risk.
    The number one reason we’re told not to drink and drive is because we could kill someone. We’re told that from a young age, while we’re sober enough to understand the potential consequences of driving drunk. Making that choice to drive anyway puts innocent people on the road in jeopardy, and ultimately can take the lives of people who were just minding their own lives.
    Vick did a terrible thing, but he didn’t kill a human; sober or not, Little did, and he should’ve known better. If you want to insinuate that Vick is a far worse person, then come up with something better, or at least show me how you value a dog’s life more than a human’s.

  18. Mastro says: Apr 30, 2009 11:45 AM

    Hey @$$holes, it’s not about the dogs, it was about a person who is supposed to be a rolemodel breaking the law. and not just for the first time, it was the breaking point along a string of minor incidents of marijuana possession and being a general degenerate. If he wants to be a professional athlete and role model he should act like one and all of his actions spoke to the contrary.
    I hope he does get reinstated and some team is dumb enough to sign him, and all of their seats are empty every week of the season because the only people supporting him cant even afford football tickets.

  19. topcide says: Apr 30, 2009 11:55 AM

    comparing the actions of vick to other players who have gotten themselves into deep sh*t is like apples and oranges, and is irrelevant.
    each situation is diffferent, and has to be handled as such.
    personally I feel the thing is that vick lied. He lied on multiple occassions, to multiple people, he lied to the face of the commish.
    the core basis of the arguement is weather vick truely feels bad for what he did becasue he realizes he is wrong, not becasue he got caught.
    The whole thing has to be anazlyzed and looked at to see if vick is the calibre of person who dererves a kings ransom to play a kids game.
    Personaly i would think that it’s prett easy to answer when you take into consideration that he knowingly broke laws and inteded to do so, engaged in acts the most people find disgusting, then lied about them untill the evidence turned up and there were no more lies to tell. I would also think that the fact (alleged) that he gave knowingly gave someone a sexually transmitted diesease would play into the matter.
    some people have shown they don’t deserve another shot.

  20. TommyUrbanskisLegs says: Apr 30, 2009 11:57 AM

    Christ, the man served his time. I love how some people take the frustration they have with their life out on athletes.
    Role models? Please. If athletes are your children’s role models, do some better parenting.
    Also, Dungy is going to talk to Vick like he’s his son? Uh, that didn’t work out so well last time…..

  21. Sheward says: Apr 30, 2009 11:58 AM

    Hopefully, Dungy will keep his mind — and his eyes — open for precisely such an observation.
    =============================================
    I check this site 5-10 times a day, and I’m one of those guys who reads the comments and thinks, “If you think Florio is such a dumbass, why do you come to his site?”
    I gotta say though, while it’s not keeping me away from the site, I am getting a little annoyed at Florio’s Vick Vendetta. I just can’t figure it out. You’d think that Vick killed one of Florio’s dogs or something.

  22. vbeach31 says: Apr 30, 2009 12:00 PM

    Florio,
    get off his case. Chirst, regardless of what he did, he paid his debt to society, and deserves a second chance to live his life. Football is the talent he pocesses so why should he be denied access back to the NFl. You would think he killed a person. And I have a dog and love it to death, but come on. People eat dogs in other countries and have deer heads mounted on their walls. I dont condone dog fighting what so ever, but its not a reason to take away somone’s whole way of living, after they have served their times. I have seen drug dealers and sexual offenders get slapped on the wrist and they are harming people. Where is PETA in the south where people cock fight daily. And your opinion doesnt really count because as long as Vick has the talent to dominate the NFL, at least one team will be willing to take him

  23. F00kFl0ri0 says: Apr 30, 2009 12:01 PM

    I can’t wait until Michael Vick scores his first touchdown, and then starts humping the goal post in his new “Doggy Style” celebration dance then points his finger in the sky……
    You know in memory for all the dead doggies!!!!!!!! How could he get fined, he’s showing genuine remorse for all the doggie lives that he snuffed out…..
    He’d be initating the Gangsta’s with Hearts movement………

  24. Chris from MD says: Apr 30, 2009 12:02 PM

    Shawn Lowrie wrote:
    “Vick has served time, but ruining his life should not be high on the league’s ‘to do’ list.”
    ————————
    Uhh, the league ruined Vick’s life? Or did the choices that Mike Vick made, ruin his life?
    Vick had it all. Lots of money, fame,etc., he pissed it all away for some backwoods fun. How did the League exactly ruin Mike Vick’s life?

  25. John Cittebart says: Apr 30, 2009 12:06 PM

    “a team shouldn’t give Vick another opportunity because of his skills, but because “it’s the right thing to do.””
    ?
    Very weak.
    Even the most charitible-minded, community-minded, finest-role-model players are signed because one their skills.
    Does Dungy have an assistant coaching job of some sort for Vick?

  26. vbeach31 says: Apr 30, 2009 12:11 PM

    Okay Mastro,
    you say its about being a role model, your right. But he is a human and no one is perfect. We all make mistakes. Brett Favre was a role model and has every NFL throwing record, yet he was a stone cold drug addict. All professional athletes are SUPPOSED to be role models, but its safe to say it doesnt always work out that way. WOW marijuana, you have no idea how many athletes smoke weed and do even worst (nose candy Matt Jones). The point is, he paid his debt to society so he deserves a second chance. He will still be a great athlete, if anything it gave his body time to heal up. I just people wouldn’t cast stones s if their perfect

  27. stiller43 says: Apr 30, 2009 12:14 PM

    It’s not an issue of it being LESS bad because only dogs were harmed, and not humans. The issue is he meant to hurt these innocent creatures. He drowned, strangled, electrocuted, and starved animals for entertainment and with a totally clear head. For someone to treat other lives like this is unforgivable.
    Little and Stallworth made the terrible mistake of driving while drunk. They each made one dumb decision that cost a person their life. However, Little and Stallworth did not mean anyone or anything any harm, they made the mistake (probably just like most of the readers here do at least once a week) of drinking and driving.
    Vick—went out of his way to torture and harm otherwise innocent lives multiple times as if it’s an acceptable culture.
    Little and Stallworth—made ONE mistake (each) and unfortunately someone else (and their families and friends) had to pay for it.

  28. ChrisJNelson says: Apr 30, 2009 12:17 PM

    Dungy’s going to talk to Vick like he’s his son? I’m not sure that’s a good thing…

  29. EverybodyGotAIDS says: Apr 30, 2009 12:19 PM

    Nice play here… I’m with Dungy (seemingly) in thinking that Vick deserves a 2nd chance. No better person to have in your court than Tony Dungy.
    What a fantastic man and hopefully he is able to have some meaningful impact on this man…
    —————————-
    Yes, Dungy the hate-mongering fundamentalist. Superb role-model for all those aspiring bigots.

  30. brauneyz says: Apr 30, 2009 12:22 PM

    OK, so I’m NOT the only one creeped out by Dungy talking to Vick “like his son”….

  31. Pea Tear Griffin says: Apr 30, 2009 12:30 PM

    “Dungy said that he did just that with kicker Mike Vanderjagt, who publicly slammed Dungy and quarterback Peyton Manning. Dungy met with Vanderjagt, and decided to keep him around.”
    I’m sure his skills had NOTHING to do with it.
    And…
    -“I’ll talk to him like he’s my son,” Dungy said.
    I thought the same thing that EverybodyGotAID, and budchase666 did. Whatever, it doesn’t make me a monster. I’m just sayin’ that’s probably not the best analogy for Dungy to use.

  32. Hiperactivo says: Apr 30, 2009 12:42 PM

    What I’d like to know is, Would Tony Dungy be so willing to support a white person?, a White person that acidentally murdered a Black person?… my guess is he would not.

  33. Swervinmervin says: Apr 30, 2009 12:53 PM

    So if Vick was drunk he wouldnve been cleared to to do what he did? Nice logic, Florio. Being drunk is not an excuse for committing a crime. Especially killing someone.
    One human life is more valuable than a million dogs.
    Bottom line is that Vick is a dog killer and Little is a drunk murderer.
    Hell, Vick is a friggin choir boy compared to Little.

  34. FalconDevil says: Apr 30, 2009 12:56 PM

    I hate Vick for what he did to the Falcons organization as a fan. That said, he did his time, let him play.

  35. ReverendTom says: Apr 30, 2009 12:58 PM

    If the state thinks he is rehabilitated enough to be released from prison, he deserves a second shot. He served his time. Let the man move on with his life.

  36. corncobb says: Apr 30, 2009 1:00 PM

    The thing that does piss me off is the fact that animals are held in higher regard than human life. The beating, torture, and killing of animals is detestable. Don’t get me wrong. The only thing that is worse in the eyes of the PC sports world is if someone used a racial slur. Everything is upside down. Vick is just a symptom of what is truly wrong with pro sports.

  37. holladay22 says: Apr 30, 2009 1:01 PM

    I really dont know what’s wrong with you PFT guys but what Little was convicted of is worst then Vick killing some dogs. I bet if your parents were in that car your thought would be alot different. There would be no second chance in mind. So stop it. Let the man play!!!

  38. Kevin from Philly says: Apr 30, 2009 1:09 PM

    “I’ll talk to him like he’s my son,” Dungy said.
    Yeah, I hate to be disrespectful, but that’s a little creepy given the circumstances.

  39. GeauxSaints12 says: Apr 30, 2009 1:09 PM

    Why would someone pick a athlete as a role model? I hope you guys on this site don’t use athletes as role models.

  40. bleedgreen25 says: Apr 30, 2009 1:11 PM

    I agree with what you’re saying about intent. Certainly shooting someone you hate with the intent to kill is different from just randomly shooting into a crowd and killing someone. One is premeditated; one is reckless.
    Now on the topic as to whether it is worse to kill a dog or a human, you are comparing two different things entirely. As much as PETA would hate me for this, the value of a human life is greater than the value of any other animal on this planet. Humans are immortal beings; we have the ability to reason, at least most of us, and in varying degrees. Don’t get me wrong–I think it is wrong to mercilessly and unnecessarily kill any animal.
    However, killing a man and killing a dog are two different things entirely.

  41. DC_Bengals_Fan says: Apr 30, 2009 1:23 PM

    “So tired about hearing about the lives of these D@mn Dogs…Legally your guys are correct so I won’t argue that point. But it would seem that these other 2 gentlemen got a second chance after vehicular manslaughter which the life of a HUMAN BEING was taken Vick should definetly be given a second chance hell if Pac Man Jones got it and becuase of his actions that he was not directly apart of left a man paralyzed tehn VIck should have a second chance.”
    Just to quiet your hypocrisy meter, I’m pretty sure the same people who want Vick out of the league also want Jones and Leonard Little gone too. It’s not like anyone’s putting dog torture as worse than killing a person (outside of PETA, maybe, but they’re nuts).

  42. TransplantedFan says: Apr 30, 2009 1:23 PM

    Playing in the NFL is a privelege, not a right. Teams should not give Vick a second chance because its “the right thing to do.” Lets not forget that first and foremost, the NFL is a business. A team should consider whether or not Goodell will come down on Vick exceptionally hard if he so much as jaywalks, can he still play, and will the loss of revenue due to disgusted fans outweigh the new revenue of Vick-related merchandise. I realize that in the NFL it only takes 1 team to say yes, but I think when teams analyze the idea of signing Vick based on that sort of risk-reward matrix, it seems pretty clear to me that he just wouldn’t be worth it.

  43. Mini Ditka says: Apr 30, 2009 1:28 PM

    Florio,
    I want you to look into the eyes of the kids of the woman killed by Leonard Little and tell them that in your opinion what Michael Vick did was worse than what Leonard Little did.
    Why don’t you tell the family of the man killed by Donte Stallworth a similar thing.

  44. SFTitan says: Apr 30, 2009 1:38 PM

    BamBam you’re a real idiot. Mike Vick should not get a second chance. You’re too stupid to understand the difference between a lapse of judgement and the conscious decision to watch the torture and death of animals. Let me guess your some hillbilly retard who works on a farm?
    Am I right?

  45. bdhumbert says: Apr 30, 2009 1:39 PM

    Mastro – forget the role model thing – I have never wanted my kids or grand children to look up to an athlete for anything other than the performance.
    That being said, Vick is TOXIC – I am amazed how this is still alive – the damage to the NFL from allowing him back in – and the damage to any team that signs him is going to be huge – in the end the TV sponsors will not let this happen – they can’t afford too.

  46. jjcruiser says: Apr 30, 2009 1:44 PM

    I still disagree with your point Florio, as I have since day one. Criminal negligence in killing human beings is a hundred times worse in my book than criminal intent in killing dogs. Respectfully, I think you have the hierarchy of sins backwards.

  47. jasegou says: Apr 30, 2009 1:44 PM

    Florio You are WRONG You are Dead Wrong about the difference in crimes between Vick & Little/Stallworth
    If you cannot understand that gambling is perfectly legal and dog fighting while vicious is not at all in anyway comparable to taking a human life then you are an idiot.

  48. Bendak says: Apr 30, 2009 1:48 PM

    Little and Stallworth drank more than they could handle and got into a vehicle. They did not PLAN on killing people, they figured they could get home no problem, they were good to go. Does that make Little and Stallworth innocent? Of course not. The difference is willful intent. Vick didn’t accidentally do what he did, his actions were premeditated and executed his plans in cold blood, without remorse. No, it wasn’t people he was butchering, if it had been, he’d have put Hitler to shame. It is still disturbing and wrong though. There’s something wrong with Mike Vick’s brain.
    I like the comparison that Dungy made between Mike Vick and Mike Vanderjagt. Besides having the same first name, there is nothing to be compared there. Good reference to show his bias.
    (Dungy explained that a team shouldn’t give Vick another opportunity because of his skills, but because “it’s the right thing to do.”)
    I don’t have the skills to play in the NFL, but hey, it’s the right thing to do, so some team should let me play. It’s the right thing to do. Tony is doing a wonderful job of ruining his credibility.

  49. mborz says: Apr 30, 2009 1:54 PM

    For all of the people who insist on inserting the “humans > dogs” argument:
    Nobody is going to argue that, in general, a dog’s life is more important than a human’s. Nobody has ever said it here, that I can remember, and to accuse people of saying it is a little silly, because the answer is completely obvious.
    If someone thinks that Vick deserves a more severe punishment than Stallworth (I don’t BTW), it doesn’t mean that they think dogs are more important than humans. It means that they are giving more weight to “intent” than you would.

  50. Mastro says: Apr 30, 2009 2:05 PM

    I’m just befuddled by how many people are saying athletes shouldnt be role models, if thats the case than no child growing up would want to play sports because their wouldnt be a person that theyd be impersonating.
    Everytime I threw a football, I wanted to throw like Joe Montana, every time I pithced a baseball I wanted to pitch like Nolan Ryan, everytime I played hockey, I wanted to score like Mario Lemieux. To say athletes arent role models is just rediculous and is being used as a basis for your argument to justify Vick deserves a second chance.
    But I guess now I have another person to mold myself after, everytime i slap my dog across the face for peeing on the carpet I can punish him like Mike Vick.. yup, now I feel better!

  51. sportsbook says: Apr 30, 2009 2:16 PM

    He’s one guy that could talk some sense into him.

  52. bshazzar says: Apr 30, 2009 2:23 PM

    Ignorance by PFTcommentors never ceases to fail me. It’s always humorous to watch people get mad at Florio for quoting someone else, or making the assumption that just because someone posts a blurb about a subject that they are “hatin” on a particular person. Florio is no fool. He knows what the hot button topics are and he posts on them. Everytime he posts something on Vick, Favre, Warner, or a story that always points back to Leonard Little the comment count goes through the roof. Why would he not post it then? It sparks controversy and you guys fall for it every time.
    Now, on to the matter of the actual post. Just because it’s a privelege to play in the NFL doesn’t mean you can’t get a second chance to play in it. There are very few actual rights in this world, so most of the stuff in our daily lives is a privelege. Vick is a football player, what’s he supposed to do? bag groceries? Come on. Also, Dungy didn’t say he was automatically giving him a second chance, he said he was going to talk to the person Michael Vick and more than likely like no person has truly talked to Vick before. If there had been a man like Dungy in Vick’s life growing up, he wouldn’t be in the situation he is today. Vick is still a kid who can turn his life around and Dungy’s going there to speak to the kid, not the football player.
    As to critics of Dungy still being in the NFL news feed: Just because he’s retired doesn’t mean he doesn’t have any clout as to the NFL. He’s an ambassador of the NFL, and his life’s work is about raising men. He uses his recognition to accomplish things. I never understood cursing two different men in the same breath for doing two opposite things. I guess it has something to do with lack of life experience or world view. Dungy’s also not talking to Vick because he’s black, but because he’s one of the most recognizeable names out there and if Dungy can successfully aid the turnaround of Vick’s life then that would speak volumes to people around the world and the country.

  53. ndallasruss says: Apr 30, 2009 2:32 PM

    “One human life is more valuable than a million dogs.”
    Please. I’ve met a LOT of humans whose lives aren’t worth the price of a Happy Meal.
    Give me a choice between saving the lives of ten random homeless people, or my own pets, and I’m picking my pets every time.
    Heck – let me pick between all the criminals in the world, and one random dog in a park, and see how quick the crime rate goes down.

  54. Pea Tear Griffin says: Apr 30, 2009 2:35 PM

    @Chris from MD
    Best point of this thread. GJ

  55. bshazzar says: Apr 30, 2009 2:40 PM

    EverybodyGotAIDS says:
    April 30th, 2009 at 12:19 pm
    “Yes, Dungy the hate-mongering fundamentalist. Superb role-model for all those aspiring bigots. ”
    And what does that make you with your use of the name calling, stereotypical hate speech with which you’ve chosen to write? I smell a hypocrite.
    Bendak says:
    “I like the comparison that Dungy made between Mike Vick and Mike Vanderjagt. Besides having the same first name, there is nothing to be compared there. Good reference to show his bias.”
    The comparison was brought about to show that Dungy is willing to give second chances to truly remorseful people, not about comparing the magnitude of their respective wrong doings.
    “(Dungy explained that a team shouldn’t give Vick another opportunity because of his skills, but because “it’s the right thing to do.”)
    I don’t have the skills to play in the NFL, but hey, it’s the right thing to do, so some team should let me play. It’s the right thing to do. Tony is doing a wonderful job of ruining his credibility. ”
    It’s so sad how you miss a simple point. SECOND CHANCE for the RIGHT REASON. This goes in line with teams who don’t cut superstars when they break the law, but will be quick to cut a third stringer who’s done something 10X less. When you give a player additional chances based on his skillset instead of whether the player has learned their lesson and have a heart change, it sends a wrong message to that player that no matter what he does wrong as long as he can run fast and break tackles then he doesn’t have to change his ways. AGAIN, DUNGY is going to talk to Vick to see if he can make a life change in the human being. Vick has obviously been given a pass and praise his entire life because of what he can do on the football field. This has severely damaged the priorities and decision making of Michael Vick the young man.

  56. ReverendTom says: Apr 30, 2009 2:47 PM

    Matro –
    Imitating yourself after a person while playing a sport is not them being a role model. A role model is someone who teaches you how to lead your life. Role Models include what they do off the field, not necessarily on the field (unless you are talking about sportmanship, not talent). But I agree athletes are role models. Anyone in the public spotlight is a role model. You can’t control who people look up to.

  57. bshazzar says: Apr 30, 2009 2:52 PM

    Mastro says:
    April 30th, 2009 at 2:05 pm
    “Everytime I threw a football, I wanted to throw like Joe Montana, every time I pithced a baseball I wanted to pitch like Nolan Ryan, everytime I played hockey, I wanted to score like Mario Lemieux.”
    Funny how the things you listed as emulating have nothing to do with the actual person or their character, but with their performance on the field.
    You then go on to Michael Vick and write, “But I guess now I have another person to mold myself after, everytime i slap my dog across the face for peeing on the carpet I can punish him like Mike Vick.. yup, now I feel better!” This only refers to his off-field exploits.
    What’s the point you were making?

  58. FriarTurd says: Apr 30, 2009 2:54 PM

    No matter the intent of the act, the reality of the matter is that drunk driving kills people. To drive drunk and kill someone as a result of your actions is no less selfish an act than intentionally fighting dogs for gambling and entertainment purposes. This arguement will never make sense.
    Look, I love dogs and what Vick did to dogs is without question a truely awful, inhumane thing. But you would be hard pressed to find anyone who misses those dogs as much as either drunk driving victim discussed misses their loved one. You can not equate the life of a human being with that of a dog, you just can’t. They aren’t equal and regardless of the intent of Vick, Little or Stallworth there is no way the lives of an animal are in any situation more valuable than a human beings. There is no way that the act of dog fighting is more socially unacceptable than an innocent person’s life being taken away because someone wanted to have a good time and then say “oops” when someone is killed as a result. It just makes no damn sense.
    And as far as athletes being role models, give me a break. They are people who are only placed on a pedistal because they can run faster and have better coordination than your average person and make tons of money. PARENTS SHOULD BE THEIR CHILD’S ROLE MODEL. RAISE YOUR CHILDREN. If anything should tell you that, it should be the “Days without an arrest” counter on this very screen. Athletes aren’t qualified to be role models, they are qualified to have lots of money and make bad decisions with it. I think we are better than this.

  59. jaxeagle821 says: Apr 30, 2009 3:14 PM

    Okay all you idiots who think it’s creepy that Dungy will speak to him like a son, Tony Dungy has more then one son and to quickly bring up his deceased son is disturbing. Back to Michael Vick why is everyone concerned whether or not he gets a second chance? Are you guys going to stop watching the games, or maybe just the games Vick plays in. Get over it and get on with your lives geez.

  60. favrewillplay4ever says: Apr 30, 2009 4:09 PM

    it is disgusting that you people defend stallworth and little. we all know they made mistakes but they did take HUMAN lives, yet you completely condone what vick did. you want to condemn him to hell. you are the type of people that don’t believe in testing on animals, but i guarantee you wouldn’t volunteer to be tested yourselves. our own damn president lied to congress, the attorney general and the whole nation and you don’t want him condemned for it. i am not advocating what michael did, but i do support the man. he made a mistake and was severely disciplined. i am sure none of you are perfect so quit throwing stones at the guy. josh hamilton made some surely stupid decisions in his life but he was given multiple chances….. look at the story he has created. top of the world to crack addict back to level ground as a humble god loving role model now. give michael that chance as well. give people the opportunity to learn from their mistakes and become better individuals. I SUPPORT MICHAEL VICK. even if he never makes it back to stardom, i will forever remember him rushing and throwing for over 170 each against the vikings. also for ending our home playoff winning streak at lambeau.

  61. Raiders757 says: Apr 30, 2009 4:29 PM

    Vick should not be allowed to return, or ever have another shot at easy wealth. He had his chance and blew it.
    Where he comes from, kids look up to thugs and criminals, because nothing happens to these people. No example is ever made, due to a revolving door justice system. It’s a huge problem everywhere. Our laws are pathetically enforced. Everyone who breaks the law, should be made an example of.
    What kind of message does it send out to the children of Newport News, when they see a guy blow his chance of fame and fortune by breaking the law, only to get it all back as if it never ever happened at all.
    Vick had his chance. He should now be forced to work like the rest of us, as well as live the same. He should no longer be a crutch for his leeches/family, as they should be forced to make an honest living as well.

  62. Raiders757 says: Apr 30, 2009 4:34 PM

    @ vbeach31
    “Chirst, regardless of what he did, he paid his debt to society, and deserves a second chance to live his life. Football is the talent he pocesses so why should he be denied access back to the NFl”
    Read what I said above. He deserves a second chance at life, sure, but not a second chance at fame and fortune. It’s soft backs like you that have helped our society to go to shit. Examples must be made of criminals, and having NFL talent shouldn’t give you a free pass back to champagne dreams and caviar.
    Let him work and pay rent for a slum in the East End of Newport News. That’s where he belongs until he can work his way out like everyone else.

  63. DJSlyBri says: Apr 30, 2009 4:40 PM

    The snarky comments referencing the suicide of Mr. Dungy’s son are as dumb as anything i have ever seen here. I hope you guys feels real proud of yourselves for your humor and wit.
    Mr. Dungy is Vick’s ticket back this year. America is a second chance country and Mr. Dungy’s respect in and out of football will carry a LOT of weight. For example, my wife knows a little bit about football but not really that much. She is well aware of Mr. Dungy and thinks VERY highly of him. (Don’t underestimate the influence Mr. Dungy’s opinion has on the Christian community).
    I think Vick deserves a second chance. I once benefitted from a second chance and I know that many of the readers here have.

  64. Raiders757 says: Apr 30, 2009 4:44 PM

    “Role models? Please. If athletes are your children’s role models, do some better parenting.”
    I agree with this comment from the first page. The thing is, no matter how good a role model we, as parents, are, our children will always have another “hero” to look up to as well. Hence this argument fails in this case, a lots of kids with great parental role models still look up to football players and jocks.
    That being said, it is time to set a new standard, and it should start right now. Vick should never be allowed to play again. I say this for the youth of America, not the fugging dogs.

  65. Raiders757 says: Apr 30, 2009 4:58 PM

    “Vick is a football player, what’s he supposed to do? bag groceries? Come on.”
    Come on!! Come on?!!
    are you kidding. Why can’t he bag groceries? Just because he can play a game really well, it doesn’t mean he can’t make it in the real world with the rest of us. He chose his path, and now he should have to walk it.
    What’s he supposed to do? He can work a normal job like normal people. That way a parental role model can go “see, Jr., even if your a popular football player, if you break the law, your not above the law or anyone else. If you don’t make the right choices in life, you could end up like Mr. Vick over there bagging groceries. From champagne dream and caviar, to “would you like paper or plastic?”. It doesn’t set a better example than that folks, and that is how it should be.
    If he then becomes a success in another career other than sports, it will also set another positive example.
    Allowing him back in football will teach no lessons at all. not even to Mr. Vick.

  66. Swervinmervin says: Apr 30, 2009 5:26 PM

    Everyone knows that the risk of drunk driving could possibly lead to someone’s death. That’s all the intent you need for Little and Stallworth.

  67. DallasSucks says: Apr 30, 2009 5:37 PM

    Screw Mike Vick and anyone who supports or defends him.
    Screw Saint Tony too, especially if he falls for Vick’s bs.
    If there is a god, I’m certain that he/she/it prefers my dogs to either of those snake oil salesmen (or me, for that matter).

  68. ActionJackson says: Apr 30, 2009 6:09 PM

    I was in a car accident a few years back that involved a drunk driver and 1 of the 17 year old kids that was with me died choking on his own blood on the side of the road while I watched also now I am permanently injured. Intent to do something or not doesn’t matter what Stallworth and Little did is ten times worse. No one should kill dogs for sport but Id rather have a man that meant to kill dogs then men that killed people accidentally(by the way if your drunk an hit someone its not an accident its murder, you had the choice to drive the car drunk) represent me or my company any day . Whoever makes the case that what vick did was worse(Florio) is an idiot and obviously has never personally experienced what drunk driving can do.
    Also people need to stop with he lied and didnt stop until all the evidence was out there. There is not a soul alive including you Florio that hasn’t lied got called out on it and kept lying to stay out of trouble or try to save face. Thats why they say once you lie the more lies you have to tell to keep your first one alive(I dont remember the exact saying). Self preservation is the most basic of human natures we all do it so stop.
    So if the NFL lets stallworth back in and already allowed Little back in there shouldn’t be a question that Vick gets reinstated.(3rd paragraph)

  69. brian_21 says: Apr 30, 2009 6:14 PM

    Correction, use this one.
    Florio, you’re wrong to make what Mike Vick did seem WORSE than what Leonard Little did.
    Facts and data are extremely obvious and well known regarding drinking excessively and then deciding to drive a vehicle. People die.
    Plus, animals do deserve respect, and I feel awful about the dogs.
    But dogs are not people. And it seems to me that your explanation treated dogs like people and people like dogs.

  70. mvlonergan says: Apr 30, 2009 6:21 PM

    Let’s see … killing a person or killing a dog. Killing a dog is not worse, not matter how much that behavior is a regular part of a person’s life What Vick did was inhumane, but he didn’t display the same reckless regard for human life that Little or Stallworth did when they drove drunk. Vick’s actions didn’t leave someone without a wife and mother the way Little’s did. Or without a husband and father — one who was on his way home from working the night shift — like Stallworth’s did. Those were human beings. Not dogs.

  71. upearly says: Apr 30, 2009 6:32 PM

    It’s very simple… BOYCOT the NFL and it’s SPONSERS if if they let this low life back in. The league is doing just fine without this punk…
    Little being allowed to play was a mistake.. letting Vick back in would be a financial disaster.

  72. myusernamestinks says: Apr 30, 2009 7:20 PM

    “I’ll talk to him like he’s my son,” Dungy said.
    That’s called a seance, isn’t it?

  73. Elaw6 says: Apr 30, 2009 7:47 PM

    Florio hates on Vick because Vick destroyed West Va. Back in his collegiate career. I don’t care if Vick killed president Bam Bam’s dog’s, time served let the man live

  74. fanaticalfan says: Apr 30, 2009 8:02 PM

    Millions of Dogs are killed in this country every year by pounds and animal shelters, if they are judged to be unadoptable.
    Vick killed a few dogs that he judged to be unfightable.
    So the objection isn’t the action, it is the reason and the way the action is caried out. Because it was for gambling and because he may have subjected these animals to pain (Which I am not even sure is accurate if he drowned them).
    It was a willing act. However, drinking and driving is a willing act, not a stupid mistake. You always have a choice whether or not you get into a car after drinking. This willing action caused a couple people their lives.
    Minimizing the actions of drunk drivers by calling it a stupid mistake is assinine. I am disappionted in Florio.
    Let Vick in, if a team wants him.

  75. dave61 says: May 1, 2009 12:36 AM

    Dungy needs to focus on his own family and not Vicks high camera profile spotlight…..Dungy thinks he’s a god….. with his bs lectures about gays in the nfl and how they outta stop being deviants…… too bad he couldn’t reach his own son with his effective b.s.

  76. dave61 says: May 1, 2009 12:40 AM

    how many superboowls would peyton have had with a real coach? and what about Tampa ….. as soon as they fired him (dungy) Gruden won it all……………..

  77. dave61 says: May 1, 2009 12:45 AM

    look Dungy screwed the dawg pound like Vick screwed the pitbulls…. two peas in a pod in my book….. when he didnt play his starters against the Titans and let them into the playoffs while our team got sent home………. was that a christian act…. not if youre from Cleveland…… Dungy outta be asking God why he couldn’t help his own son out cause he worked 80 a hours a week………. seems kinda hypocritical to me that he’s gonna be Vicks savior.

  78. Chris from MD says: May 1, 2009 8:37 AM

    @ Pea Tear Griffin
    Thanks. I was practically floored when I saw what the other commentor wrote. Regardless of the arguements (and that’s what they are, difference of opinion), you can’t argue that the League ruined Mike Vick’s life. Mike Vick did that all own his own, no one else. It’s a choice you make. Just like drinking and driving, it’s a choice you make.
    Speaking of DUI’s versus killing of animals:
    There is a reason that DUI’s are laws. There is a possibility to do harm to another person, their property, or their way of life. Everyone makes mistakes and a DUI is just that, a mistake, unless it’s habitual, then I could see it as intent. HOWEVER: A NFL player should NEVER get a DUI. They make enough money to afford a $100 taxi ride, and I’m pretty sure most teams will/do provide players/staff with a limo/taxi service. I find a NFL player that gets a DUI just as bad as any other criminal, Mike Vick included.

  79. bshazzar says: May 1, 2009 8:59 AM

    Raiders757 says:
    April 30th, 2009 at 4:29 pm
    “Vick should not be allowed to return, or ever have another shot at easy wealth. He had his chance and blew it.”
    Vick is up to the top of the Empire State Building in debt, when he comes back he’ll be playing for meager rations, because no one will take on his current contract with the risk involved. Vick won’t have easy wealth for the rest of his life so your point is dead. Find somewhere else to project your bitterness.
    “No example is ever made, due to a revolving door justice system. It’s a huge problem everywhere. Our laws are pathetically enforced. Everyone who breaks the law, should be made an example of.”
    Uhm…he’s been in prison for the last 2 years and may not make it into the league. He has lost a multitude of fans, his reputation, and millions upon millions of dollars and any future endorsment deal. Everyone across the world knows about this cautionary tale. How has he not been made an example of?
    “What kind of message does it send out to the children of Newport News, when they see a guy blow his chance of fame and fortune by breaking the law, only to get it all back as if it never ever happened at all.”
    Again, he went to prison, lost his money, his reputation, and has to be scrutinized any more than he was before for the rest of his life. He’ll have to jump through a series of hoops to even get a sniff of the NFL, not to mention everything positive in his future that he lost. That’s not exactly like nothing happened at all. If he does get to play in the NFL again, he’ll get people harassing him, picket lines, fans throwing doggy treats while he’s on the sideline. Again, NOT like anything happened. No one said clean slate. They just said second chance.
    Raiders757 says:
    April 30th, 2009 at 4:58 pm
    Come on!! Come on?!!
    “are you kidding. Why can’t he bag groceries? Just because he can play a game really well, it doesn’t mean he can’t make it in the real world with the rest of us. He chose his path, and now he should have to walk it.
    What’s he supposed to do? He can work a normal job like normal people. That way a parental role model can go “see, Jr., even if your a popular football player, if you break the law, your not above the law or anyone else. If you don’t make the right choices in life, you could end up like Mr. Vick over there bagging groceries. From champagne dream and caviar, to “would you like paper or plastic?”. It doesn’t set a better example than that folks, and that is how it should be.
    If he then becomes a success in another career other than sports, it will also set another positive example.
    Allowing him back in football will teach no lessons at all. not even to Mr. Vick. ”
    no I’m not kidding, you seem to think that just because his job his high profile that it has it’s own set of rules. Actors/Singers/Comedians/Performers get arrested and in trouble all the time and some have done terrible things, does that mean they shouldn’t be allowed to ever Perform again? Or is it just football or sports that you have the problem with? double standard? What do you do for a living? Should a construction worker who did the same thing as Vick, went to prison and served his time, shouldn’t be allowed to work construction again? I just think you’re bitter that you missed your shot at professional sports and want to project it onto someone who messed up their chance who did make it. No one said he should have it easy, because Lord knows, right now he doesn’t and he won’t ever have it easy again. Vick has trained his whole life to be a football player and it’s basically the only thing he knows, so yes he should get a second chance. No one said it should be easy, they just said he should get a second chance, myself included. Also of note, I am not, nor have I ever been a Vick fan or supporter, as a matter of fact I can’t stand the guy, but there’s no way after he has already served his time in prison should he NOT get a chance to play football for a living again.

  80. Pea Tear Griffin says: May 1, 2009 10:19 AM

    Okay listen up. A loser cousin of mine is a (non-violent) felon. He’s a college grad. He can’t get a job at F-N WaWa right now.
    So those of you saying, “he paid his debt…. blah blah blah” you are wrong.
    And the last poster, @bshazzar. You used the the construction worker reference.
    “Should a construction worker who did the same thing as Vick, went to prison and served his time, shouldn’t be allowed to work construction again?”
    Using the real world as an example, no he shouldn’t.

  81. bshazzar says: May 1, 2009 12:12 PM

    Pea Tear Griffin says:
    May 1st, 2009 at 10:19 am
    “Okay listen up. A loser cousin of mine is a (non-violent) felon. He’s a college grad. He can’t get a job at F-N WaWa right now.
    So those of you saying, “he paid his debt…. blah blah blah” you are wrong.”
    Wow, the ignorance in that statement astounds me. We’re not talking about what is and isn’t, we’re talking about should and shouldn’t. Your “loser cousin” should be able to get a second chance at a job, unless he was a teacher and molested a child. That’s a whole different circumstance and since you didn’t bother giving the details of the situation I can’t comment. I don’t know the crime, or the sentence he served. Jamal Lewis went to prison and came right back into the league no problem, got a starting gig and everything. Less severe crime, less severe sentence.
    “And the last poster, @bshazzar. You used the the construction worker reference.
    “Should a construction worker who did the same thing as Vick, went to prison and served his time, shouldn’t be allowed to work construction again?”
    Using the real world as an example, no he shouldn’t.”
    Care to give reasons based on more than personal opinion? I feel sorry for your real world and hope your personal guidelines on life are used on you. Besides, it’s the mentality of people like you that’s keeping your “loser cousin” from even being able to work at a WaWa. For some reason you and others are looking at Vick like he’s in a profession that at the end of the day really means nothing; Just because he’s on TV and was getting paid millions of dollars. Vick is part of a privately owned business in the field of entertainment just like a musician, actor, director, dancer, producer, writer, artist, professional wrestler. His crimes had nothing to do with the job he was performing unlike Pete Rose. Whether Vick plays again in the NFL or not, he’ll still be facing repercussions in the form of public opinion, reputation, and finances. If he’s truly changed, he SHOULD get the chance to earn his way back into the league, whether you agree with it or not.

  82. Pea Tear Griffin says: May 1, 2009 1:38 PM

    @bshazzar
    It was a white collar type of thing. I don’t really know details. That’s the weird side of the family.
    I am glad that you brought up the Pete Rose reference. Apart from killing and torturing animals, Vick was also running a LAGE, MULTI-STATE GAMBLING RING. Yes. Gambling is the main reason for the intricate dog fighting operation.
    Now, this probably has never been investigated, and I know Florio has brought this up in previous posts….but can you honestly say that a man running that big of a gambling ring had never placed or taken a bet on the most popular sport (for gambling and otherwise) in America???

  83. bshazzar says: May 1, 2009 2:35 PM

    @ Pea Tear Griffin
    I can’t and won’t comment on speculation as to whether he did. I can only go by actual charges and convictions. All the evidence I’ve seen and read doesn’t lead me to believe gambling traveled into his place of work. There also isn’t much of a correlation between dogfighting and point shaving betting on NFL games. I’ve played online poker, but that doesn’t mean I’ll use my work computer to do so or run an office game of craps during lunch breaks.
    Also, don’t get me twisted on Michael Vick. As I stated before I didn’t like him before, during, or after his conviction. I don’t use my personal opinion of the guy to weigh in about second chances or not. Second chances should be given to everyone, but with stipulations. If Michael Vick gets the chance to come back to the NFL, I’m sure there will be plenty.

  84. Pea Tear Griffin says: May 1, 2009 3:25 PM

    @bshazzar
    “I’ve played online poker, but that doesn’t mean I’ll use my work computer to do so or run an office game of craps during lunch breaks.”
    Online poker is not the same as running an illegal dogfighting ring buddy.
    I for one wish someone would delve into the gambling aspect of this. The brutal killing of dogs overshadows the illegal gambling in this case and I think he’s getting off easy.
    Pete Rose coulda been in the HOF if he had only killed some dogs! /sarcasm

  85. bshazzar says: May 1, 2009 9:03 PM

    Pea Tear Griffin says:
    May 1st, 2009 at 3:25 pm
    “Online poker is not the same as running an illegal dogfighting ring buddy. ”
    I clearly didn’t say that they were the same. I simply made the statement that his dogfighting gambling ring doesn’t automatically translate into betting on football games or performing the acts of Pete Rose.

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