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UFL Announces Partial Coaching Staffs

On the same day that the NFL will be making plenty of news, the upstart football league has tried to take a piece of the spotlight.
The UFL has unveiled some of the members of the coaching staffs of the four teams for the league’s first season.
The new league also has named San Francisco coach Dennis Green to be the chair of the UFL’s Competition Committee, pointing out that he once held that same role in the NFL.
Here are a few key points regarding Tuesday’s developments.
First, the UFL points out that 85 percent of assistant coaches have worked in the NFL as a player or a coach. 
Second, former AFL coach and NFL assistant Jay Gruden, the brother of Jon Gruden, will serve as offensive coordinator of the franchise headquartered in Orlando.
Third, despite prior media reports that former Stanford, Notre Dame, and Washington coach Ty Willingham will be working for Dennis Green in San Francisco, Willingham’s name does not appear in the release.  (He might eventually be named — Green’s team has not identified a special teams coordinator, a quarterbacks coach, a receivers coach, or a defensive line coach.)
Fourth, we sort of expected former Colts offensive line coach Howard Mudd or former Colts offensive coordinator Tom Moore to do a year with the UFL, if for no reason other than to stick it to the NFL.  Neither man has resurfaced with the new league.  Yet.
The Las Vegas franchise will employ the following coaches under Jim Fassel:  Isaac Carter, defensive backs; Donald Eck, offensive line; Sam Garnes, defensive assistant; Larry Mac Duff, defensive coordinator/special teams; Charles Shelton, director of football operations/running backs; Eric Van Heusen, special teams/tight ends; Michael Wilson, wide receivers; Kevin Wolthausen, defensive line.
The following coaches will work for the New York team under Ted Cottrell:  Donald Blackmon, defensive coordinator; Derrick Burroughs, administrative assistant/defensive assistant; Earle Mosley, running backs; John Tice, offensive line; Pete Rodriguez, special teams.
The Orlando team led by Jim Haslett will have the following men on his staff:  Bill Bradley, secondary; Chuck Bresnahan, linebackers; Jay Gruden, offensive coordinator; Carl Hairston, defensive line; Bill Laveroni, offensive line; Sean McVay, quality control/wide receivers; Ricky Porter, director of football operations/running backs; Al Roberts, special teams/tight ends.
The San Fran team will include the following assistants to Dennis Green:  Martin Bayless, defensive backs; Trent Bray, linebackers/quality control; Charles Collins, receivers/tight ends; Robert Griffith, defensive assistant; Art Kehoe, offensive line; Mike Kruczek, offensive coordinator; Mike McDaniel, running backs/quality control; Sid Pillai, director of football operations; Brian Stewart, defensive coordinator.

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20 Responses to “UFL Announces Partial Coaching Staffs”
  1. straverse says: May 19, 2009 10:54 AM

    Stick it to the NFL by working for the UFL? That’s a bit of a stretch.

  2. afiresnake says: May 19, 2009 11:00 AM

    Dennis Green will also be the UFL Youtube.com ambassador, because of his huge success with that role in the past …

  3. Fly says: May 19, 2009 11:05 AM

    Do they even have enough guys to have a “committee”? With only four teams, you’d think they could come up with changes via e-mail or phone calls (using Sprint, of course).

  4. sportfreak1996 says: May 19, 2009 11:08 AM

    I’m actually rooting for the UFL to be a success, I think there’s place for a minor league feeder system for the NFL in some capacity, however I don’t think having old washed up coaches as the front men of the league is the best way of going about getting this league up and running.
    Denny Green is your #1 marketable asset? Oh boy…

  5. mallet21 says: May 19, 2009 11:34 AM

    Shocking……..No Richard Solomon on Denny’s staff?? Must be a type-o

  6. rgott28 says: May 19, 2009 11:39 AM

    What I’m hoping is that after a year or two, at least two of those 4 teams are absorbed into the NFL. Vegas would be a good one, and maybe Orlando.

  7. Endo says: May 19, 2009 11:49 AM

    Why would Moore and Mudd want to stick it to the Colts? Are they the devious masterminds behind the NFL pension restructuring? Were the Colts the second shooter on the grassy knoll?

  8. Ralph GreNader says: May 19, 2009 11:53 AM

    Orlando has a star studded Staff….(All things considered)

  9. vincelombardi says: May 19, 2009 12:05 PM

    the ufl? is that thing still around?

  10. Truecoat says: May 19, 2009 12:20 PM

    How can anyone get excited about these teams without a team name. Woo hoo, I love Orlando…. Orlando what? Go Hartford what’s-their-names! It’s also much easier to say, “Hey, you watching the Jets/Fins game tonight?” “No, I’m watching New York-Hartford/Las Vegas-Sacramento game.”

  11. nebakanezer says: May 19, 2009 12:24 PM

    Jerry Glanville feels he is being blackballed……………again!

  12. Campy5 says: May 19, 2009 1:33 PM

    I don’t think Ty could cut it in the UFL

  13. Go_Vols84 says: May 19, 2009 1:37 PM

    Coach Mora wants to know how the playoffs are going to work in this league?

  14. NoHomeTeam says: May 19, 2009 2:47 PM

    I’m not quite sure how to feel about the UFL any longer.
    I was initially enthusiastic, as there was supposed to be a team in Southern California, but that seems to have gone by the wayside. The league’s initial pitch was that they were going to supply professional football to cities that were “underserved” by the NFL (their term, not mine). Apparently, they have determined that New York and San Francisco fit that category, while Los Angeles does not.
    New York I can understand. It makes sense to place a team in the biggest market in the U.S. The Bay Area franchise is more troubling. All jokes about a dearth of professional football up there aside, the fact remains that a UFL team is going to have to compete with both the 49ers and the Raiders for a fan base. An L.A. area team faces no such competition, and it’s a bigger market. The only reason that I can see for placing a team in the Bay Area is that one of the league’s principal investors lives in (or around) San Francisco.
    While an argument can be rightly made that it’s his money and he can put a team wherever he darn well pleases, the decision strikes me as kind of self-serving; Bill Hambrecht essentially wants a short commute. If the franchise — and the league — is going to be a rich man’s toy, then that’s fine. If it’s an actual business venture, I have to question the prospects of an enterprise that makes an already risky proposition even riskier by trying to shoehorn a team into an already saturated market for what appears to be reasons of convenience.
    This wouldn’t be as much of an issue if the league was launching with more than four teams. It’s one thing if one team out of, say, ten fails; it’s another situation entirely if 25% of the league can’t make it. I realize that start-up costs are significantly greater today than those faced by either the old AFL or the USFL, but I’m just not sure you can attract enough fan interest with such a limited product.
    It’s too bad. I think a viable alternate league wouldn’t be a bad thing, especially in areas where there isn’t any NFL.

  15. msnyder275 says: May 19, 2009 2:52 PM

    Ricky Porter, director of football operations/running backs
    Isn’t that title essentially General Manager/Assistant Coach?
    Three cheers for operating on a budget, but that smells like friction/conflict for Jim Haslett.

  16. redbirds37 says: May 19, 2009 5:20 PM

    Playoffs? Don’t talk about playoffs.
    Not that there is anything wrong with that!

  17. myusernamestinks says: May 19, 2009 10:24 PM

    NoHometeam, was that a comment or a job application? Well done. A viable alternate league that doesn’t include stage names and hot tubs would be welcome, but even the mighty NFL gets punched in the face when it goes to LA.

  18. nflbound says: May 23, 2009 1:16 PM

    I have had the pleasure to meet some of the coaches listed above, the experience of some of them make me question the UFL. For example Isaac Carter, defensive backs coach Las Vegas is an unknown coach for a reason. From what I know he has never been successful as a football coach. He was a High school coach who barley won a game and then a DC at a D3 school that went 0-10, and then went to the UFL. Another prime example of who you know, not how good you are. Just my opinion

  19. nflbound says: May 23, 2009 1:18 PM

    have had the pleasure to meet some of the coaches listed above, the experience of some of them make me question the UFL. For example Isaac Carter, defensive backs coach Las Vegas is an unknown coach for a reason. From what I know he has never been successful as a football coach. He was a High school coach who barley won a game and then a DC at a D3 school that went 0-10, and then went to the UFL. Another prime example of who you know, not how good you are. Just my opinion.

  20. nflbound says: May 23, 2009 1:54 PM

    have had the pleasure to meet some of the coaches listed above, the experience of some of them make me question the UFL. For example Isaac Carter, defensive backs coach Las Vegas is an unknown coach for a reason. From what I know he has never been successful as a football coach. He was a High school coach who barley won a game and then a DC at a D3 school that went 0-10, and then went to the UFL. Another prime example of who you know, not how good you are. Just my opinion

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