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Cornwell Claims Stallworth Won't Be On "House Arrest" In Classic Sense

Though the reports regarding receiver Donte’ Stallworth’s sentence for DUI manslaughter indicate that Stallworth will be placed on two years of house arrest, lawyer David Cornwell told Sirius NFL Radio on Wednesday that Stallworth won’t be placed on “house arrest,” per se.  (Thanks to SportsRadioInterviews.com for reminding us about this one.)
Instead, Stallworth will be on “community control.”
Cornwell said that Stallworth will have to submit a regular schedule as to his proposed activities, and that he’ll have to check in with probation authorities more often than a person on probation normally would.
On one hand, this characterization helps Stallworth’s effort to be permitted to play football during the coming two years.  Put simply, Stallworth won’t be wearing an ankle bracelet (possibly with a “Chico’s Bail Bonds” logo) while running pass routes.  Thus, a two-year suspension might be less likely.
On the other hand, creating the impression that “community control” isn’t really house arrest makes it seem even more befuddling that Stallworth could receive such a small restriction to his liberty for admitting to killing a man while driving drunk.
That said, Cornwell’s take seems to be a bit off the mark.  We spoke this afternoon with Gretl Plessinger, Director of Communications for the Florida Department of Corrections, regarding the concept of “community control.”
“A lot of people think of it as house arrest,” she said.
(Oops.)
Ms. Plessinger also explained that Stallworth will be required to provide a detailed weekly schedule of his activities for approval, and that his probation officer will then monitor (via techniques like the “pop-in”) whether Stallworth is complying.  She said that, by law, Florida probation officers assigned to “community control” duty have a limited number of cases, to allow them to aggressively monitor whether the person is complying with the terms of the schedule.
She also said that electronic surveillance typically isn’t used, but the judge imposing the sentence has the option of requiring the use of such a device.
So, at best, Stallworth is on “house arrest light.”  But it’s still house arrest; he has no freedom to come and go as he pleases, and all departures from his residence must be approved in advance.
Thus, the question the NFL still needs to ask itself in this case is whether the privilege of playing pro football extends to guys who are on house arrest.

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27 Responses to “Cornwell Claims Stallworth Won't Be On "House Arrest" In Classic Sense”
  1. texline says: Jun 18, 2009 1:55 PM

    Nice. They can change the definition of house arrest if you have enough money. Even if you kill somebody.The whole country is laughing at the state of Florida and their so called justice system. Cash talks I guess.

  2. supafly says: Jun 18, 2009 1:56 PM

    “All departures from his residence must be approved in advance” is quite a far, far cry from being stuck in the house 24-7-365
    All it sounds like to me is probation was a nasty probation officer–BIG DEAL!!!

  3. Elaw6 says: Jun 18, 2009 2:02 PM

    Do you see what money does for you? You can kill a man but with the right amount of money you get a away with it.
    Pay2Play Legal, I hate it.

  4. purpleguy says: Jun 18, 2009 2:08 PM

    The question I have is how soon this guy will violate the “loss of driving privileges for life” portion of his sentence/probation. Probably within a year.

  5. couchbasher says: Jun 18, 2009 2:08 PM

    I wonder if Jeb Bush had his hand in this!?!? If Stallworth plays a single game this year, I hope he’s boo’d off the field unlike anyone in the history of the game!!!! Maybe then he’ll retire….

  6. jimicos says: Jun 18, 2009 2:09 PM

    Will they ever decline permission to leave the house? If I were his PO (or whatever they call it), I’d do that a few times… Disapprove his request to leave the house, then stop by and see if he obeyed.

  7. HarrisonHits says: Jun 18, 2009 2:10 PM

    Yeah they’re going to just “pop in” to see what he’s up to in Cleveland. Yeah right.
    I like Stallworth but he got the deal of the century on this one, and it is not right in any way shape or form.

  8. chadp2351 says: Jun 18, 2009 2:13 PM

    How can a probation officer stop in when he is out of state playing an away game for the Browns? Stallworth got off way to easy for taking someone’s life.

  9. Wrathchild says: Jun 18, 2009 2:13 PM

    So, he still can’t play in the NFL for those two years. Even if its “community control,” if his probation officer is going to pop-in on Stallworth, he can’t do that if Stallworth is with the team in Denver for a game.
    So, unless they move all of Cleveland’s games to Stallworth’s back yard at his Miami home, he’s not playing.

  10. CFioren317 says: Jun 18, 2009 2:20 PM

    Florio, do you get off on talking about how much of a “privilege” it is to play in the NFL? You act like if a guy makes a mistake and then they allow him to play in the NFL that the guy might as well have run over your freaking cat. Ridiculous.
    The NFL is a business, just like any other, and if you are skilled enough to play in it, you should be allowed to play in it…up to a certain point. I agree that career criminals who have been in and out of prison for years and who have records as long as my jimmy should be banned…but they would be banned from any legitimate business like IBM, Microsoft, or Cisco, but would be allowed to work at the local diner where the owner can make them clean up the garbage and keep 25% of their take home pay. But with guys like Mike Vick, Stallworth, Burress…these are guys who have no records and who should definitely be allowed to continue their careers.

  11. Slim says: Jun 18, 2009 2:21 PM

    So instead of House Arrest Light it’s Double Stuf Probation?

  12. revans52us says: Jun 18, 2009 2:26 PM

    texline says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 1:55 pm
    Nice. They can change the definition of house arrest if you have enough money. Even if you kill somebody.The whole country is laughing at the state of Florida and their so called justice system. Cash talks I guess.
    ———————————————————————————-
    There obviously wasn’t enough for Stallworth to stand trial. Don’t get me wrong, I understand what he did and he should be in jail for what he did. On the other hand, if the state of Florida knew they had a solid case against Stallworth and there was no chance he could walk, they prosecutors would not allow the deal to be made. At the end of the day, Stallworth was at fault for drinking and the killing of the man was an accident. The prosecutors were not able to prove that drinking had anything to do with the killing, considering the man was crossing on a major highway in Miami.

  13. deymond says: Jun 18, 2009 2:33 PM

    I can’t imagine that anyone seriously thought that Stallworth would be confined to his home 24-7.
    And let’s stop acting like children, with this whole “he killed a man.” That’s a pretty heavy accusation, and I haven’t seen anything that comes close to backing it up. If you believe that the prosecutor refused to vigorously prosecute Stallworth because he’s rich and famous, that’s on the prosecutor. It doesn’t provide any evidence of Stallworth’s supposed guilt.

  14. We_Miss_You_Dan says: Jun 18, 2009 2:46 PM

    Here is the gray area I was talking about yesterday! It’s written right into whatever law is being used here. You will be on “house arrest” but not house arrest. The other house arrest we save for the people we really want to punish.
    Crime = punishment not Crime/money in your pocket for me = bullshit punishment
    What is so hard about this equation that it seems nobody gets it?
    If the commy(ish) doesn’t suspend him, then the NFL has finally made the leap to the status of the WWE in the sports world. That may be a little dramatic, but it is exactly where it’s headed at the current pace.

  15. Nibelung says: Jun 18, 2009 2:48 PM

    No proof of his guilt? I’d say the dude smeared all over the car and Stallworth being drunk is your proof. He used a large heavy object to end the life of another human. That’s bad. The guy was not “in” a cross walk but he was in an area where there was a crosswalk so people were crossing the street in that zone. The “highway” was a 40mph road and not an interstate. All these dodges for people trying to justify Stallworth and this joke of a criminal sentence which is based on Stallworth basically paying off the family and them leaning on the prosecutor.

  16. Slim says: Jun 18, 2009 2:49 PM

    “And let’s stop acting like children, with this whole “he killed a man.” That’s a pretty heavy accusation, and I haven’t seen anything that comes close to backing it up. If you believe that the prosecutor refused to vigorously prosecute Stallworth because he’s rich and famous, that’s on the prosecutor. It doesn’t provide any evidence of Stallworth’s supposed guilt.”
    ______________________________________________________
    So you believe if Joe Nobody from Florida had enough alcohol to be over the legal limit to drive a vehicle, got in his car, ran over and killed a pedestrian, that he would be treated the exact same way? You think he would walk away with 30 days in jail and 2 years of sort of house arrest?
    And what exactly do you need as evidence to back up the fact that he killed someone? Stallworth admitting guilt wasn’t enough?

  17. TheCoop says: Jun 18, 2009 2:59 PM

    I do not condone what Stallworth did, but if the family of the victim is okay with the punishment, then everyone else should STFU and mind their own business.

  18. rolltide says: Jun 18, 2009 3:04 PM

    The highest paid player in the NFL had everything he had taken away from him for something that didn’t involve humans dying. How can you guys keep with the “money buys justice” meme?

  19. highplainsdrifter says: Jun 18, 2009 3:05 PM

    As an attorney here in Florida, I can tell you that Florio was pretty much right on with his assessment. Proving the case against Stallworth would have been more trouble than people think. Also, if they would have tried the case and Stallworth walked then it could have impacted the civil case that was sure to follow. Also lost in this is that the victim’s daughter is young. Maybe the family saw this as a way to spare her the pain of watching a very public trial where her father’s life was sure to be scrutinized. I’m sure that there is a lot that all of us don’t know here.

  20. bigblue59 says: Jun 18, 2009 3:09 PM

    CFioren317
    Vick has a record its called doggy style and now so does Stallworth so far plex is the only one with out a record
    And soon he will be playing for a NY team the inmates

  21. Facts Domino says: Jun 18, 2009 3:12 PM

    Stallworth is still more of a human than Vick.

  22. eaglealan64 says: Jun 18, 2009 3:19 PM

    “Thus, the question the NFL still needs to ask itself in this case is whether the privilege of playing pro football extends to guys who are on house arrest.”
    It’s not going to come up unless he’s traded to a team in Florida ….

  23. John from Concord says: Jun 18, 2009 3:23 PM

    I don’t think he’s getting off all that lightly… remember that for all intents and purposes the guy paid a (probably) $5 million fine on top of all this stuff.

  24. EskinSux says: Jun 18, 2009 3:24 PM

    It’s not like the NFL suddenly ripped Montana/Rice…….Elway/Davis or dare i say it….Aikman/Smith from the prime of their respective careers…….. i know they all carried themselves with dignity, but I for one sure as hell didn’t miss Vick and i sure as hell won’t miss Stallworth….get over it……Why the hell the debate over fringe NFL players?……

  25. slickbs05 says: Jun 18, 2009 4:09 PM

    next time an animal runs out in front of ur car and u hit it, i hope u get the punishment u wish upon stallworth… yes he shouldnt of been driving, but if that guy wasnt jay walking ON A HIGHWAY that has cement barriers, it wouldnt of happened, and unlike an animal Mr Reyes knew what he was doing…
    so anyone that is still hating on donte or the justice system, go play in traffic like mr reyes…

  26. deymond says: Jun 18, 2009 4:16 PM

    I shouldn’t have used “supposed guilt” so generically. Obviously Stallworth is guilty of one thing or another, but not necessarily of being the primary cause of Reyes’ death. Obviously a highway with a 40 mph speed limit is designed for automobiles to travel, therefore a reasonable pedestrian would know to expect traffic on that highway, and a reasonable driver would expect to be able to drive on that highway unimpeded by pedestrians. The fact that a vehicle ended up sharing the same space victim doesn’t mean Stallworth “killed” him.
    Certainly there’s a likelihood that Stallworth, whether through his ability to compensate the family or his presumably expensive lawyer, received a lighter sentence than “Joe Blow.” However, I always thought the idea was that everyone should get a fair shake, not that everyone should get screwed equally.

  27. empty13 says: Jun 18, 2009 6:29 PM

    nope, running someone over is still vehicular homicide.

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