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Stallworth issues a non-Twitter statement

Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth, who initially reacted to his one-year suspension via profane language on Twitter, has released a more traditional statement.

“Commissioner Goodell called me this morning,” the statement reads.  “Obviously, I am disappointed, but, as I
said previously, I accept the Commissioner’s decision.  Regardless of the length of my
suspension, I will carry the burden of Mr. Reyes’ death for the rest of my life.

“I urge NFL fans not to judge NFL players or me based on my tragic lapse in judgment.  I
am a good person who did a bad thing.  I will use the period of my suspension to reflect,
fulfill my obligations, and use this experience to make a positive impact on the lives of
those who look up to NFL players.”

(So where’s the part about watching “every f–kin game”?)

Obviously, Stallworth didn’t write the statement.  And if he wants anyone to believe that it reflects his current mindset, he probably should consider finding another hobby to replace his burgeoning Twitter habit.

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33 Responses to “Stallworth issues a non-Twitter statement”
  1. litemater says: Aug 13, 2009 1:09 PM

    How about Rich Eisen, interviewing Alex Smith, talking about giving some booze to win the competition, if all else fails……..

  2. Big Stretch says: Aug 13, 2009 1:12 PM

    What he did was stupid, dangerous, illegal, and ultimately ended someone’s life. That being said lets not forget that Mr. Reyes contributed to the accident by running into the street at an area of the road that is not designated as a cross walk and at a time of day when the sun shines directly into drivers eyes. I am not attempting to take Stallworth’s side here, but I have read comments from previous posts that are calling for Donte’s head on a platter, and I ask those of you who are saying these things to take these facts into consideration when passing your judgements.
    How many of the holier than thou commenters here have made the poor decision to get behind the wheel of your car when you have had a few drinks. I can say that back in my 20′s I made the same poor choice that Stallworth did, and I got lucky not to hurt anyone in doing so.
    I agree with ‘bigtimesuperstar’ these guys should pay people to drive them around when they are drinking, but like I said above most of the people commenting on this site have driven while under the influence at least once in our lives, and like me most of us got lucky in not hurting ourselves or others.

  3. Shot Of Ginn says: Aug 13, 2009 1:18 PM

    Florio, I lose more respect for you day after day. Check your inbox if you want to know what I mean.

  4. empty13 says: Aug 13, 2009 1:20 PM

    some burden. hardly an inconvenience for donte.
    the prosecutor caved.

  5. killachap says: Aug 13, 2009 1:30 PM

    Ok wait a minute here. Stallworth hit a man who was jaywalking in a seriously tragic form of events. Do you people really think he didnt try to miss the guy or didnt try to stop? I think there is more to this than any of us will ever know. Yes he took a man’s life but clearly it was an accident. And yes he had been drinking but dont sit here and try to act like no one on here has never driven home when they knew that had had one too many. I really think he was in the wrong place at the wrong time. And let’s face it, he is much smarter than the idiot Vick who goes to a rap concert dropping the n-word and talking like he is half retarded with whatever version of english rappers or thugs speak now days.

  6. Insomniac says: Aug 13, 2009 1:33 PM

    Whoever wrote the statement for him should’ve also told him to say the same thing to ESPN. He didn’t come off all that remorseful when asked what he thought of people who felt 30 days wasn’t enough.

  7. Koam says: Aug 13, 2009 1:38 PM

    I will assume most of you realize his contrition and remorse were good until he didn’t get his way.

  8. jd says: Aug 13, 2009 1:38 PM

    How was he going to play football while under house arrest anyhow???

  9. AutumnWind999 says: Aug 13, 2009 1:44 PM

    It seems to me that the accident was also the fault of the man who got hit by running across the street. It truly sucks and it’s sad, but it’s very possible this would’ve happened even if Stallworth wasn’t drinking.
    Police said of Stallworth that “He acted like a man, he reported it immediately to the police through 911, he remained at the scene, he co-operated fully with the Miami Beach Police Department.”
    Also, from a Web site called Scoresreport.com:
    “According to Florida’s DUI manslaughter law, there are exceptions under what is called “causation” of an accident. In short, someone who is driving drunk and causes an accident is not necessarily responsible if the other party did something to contribute to the accident. Florida statute 316.119 was changed in the 1980s to reflect that after a state Supreme Court judge ruled that the state’s previous strict liability standard on drunken drivers was essentially unfair.
    The exception is based on the idea that if a drunken driver stopped at an intersection was hit by another car and the driver of the other car died, the drunken driver should not be held responsible.
    In this case, Reyes allegedly was jaywalking at the time he was hit and killed by Stallworth. If Reyes was jaywalking, it could be argued he contributed to the accident.”
    This is why Stallworth didn’t get a longer sentence.
    I think Goodell’s 1-year suspension was appropriate though.
    I also think Florio needs to get down off his high horse about Stallworth’s tweet. Stallworth has handled his tragic screwup pretty well up to this point. The tweet was based on his anticipation and excitement about resuming a key part of his life before this tragedy. Stallworth has apologized over and over again. Since the tragedy I think he’s handled things very well and been contrite for his actions. It’s not necessary for him to apologize in every single tweet or statement he makes. He should be able to comment on/discuss other topics. Dropping the f-bomb was a bad choice, but come on, it’s just a word.

  10. Kidekk says: Aug 13, 2009 1:50 PM

    And herein lies the egg. You complained that Mike Vick isn’t really remorseful because he hasn’t released a statement. Now, when Stallworth releases a statement, you point out that “it’s obvious” he didn’t write the statement. You win, again, Florio.

  11. Profound23 says: Aug 13, 2009 2:22 PM

    I don’t get how this contradicts his Twitter statement.
    Of course the tone is different, but he can feel like he wants to watch every bleeping game and still feel the way he does in this statement. One had to be censored and one did not have to be.

  12. Facts Domino says: Aug 13, 2009 2:24 PM

    Most people feel that Vick isn’t remorseful because in my opinion it is impossible to show true remorse for something that went on nearly a decade.
    That coupled with his recent comments where he allowed “someone else to take it all away from me” show that he doesn’t accept blame, and feels he’s the victim in this.

  13. meezle says: Aug 13, 2009 2:32 PM

    Autumnwind999, well stated.
    U hit every point I wanted 2

  14. Empire Jones says: Aug 13, 2009 2:33 PM

    Stallworth is going to get the “punishment” most people think he deserves as far as his NFL career.
    End of story, right?

  15. surefooted says: Aug 13, 2009 2:39 PM

    Why does he get automatically reinstated? Why wouldn’t it be conditional as was Vick’s? Are you telling me driving drunk and killing someone is less heinous than willfully killing dogs?

  16. ZombieRevolution says: Aug 13, 2009 2:43 PM

    “…who initially reacted to his one-year suspension via profane language on Twitter…”
    There is nothing more in the world that Florios likes than an athlete speaking his mind, so Florio can report it and hammer him for it. When the athlete takes the time to get help with the statement (to a greater or lesser degree) he is protrayed as disingenuous.
    It’s a Florio world and getting more so by the day…

  17. SpartaChris says: Aug 13, 2009 2:55 PM

    surefooted says:
    August 13, 2009 2:39 PM
    Why does he get automatically reinstated? Why wouldn’t it be conditional as was Vick’s? Are you telling me driving drunk and killing someone is less heinous than willfully killing dog
    ======================================
    Depends on the circumstances. Stallworth didn’t aim for the guy. His driving wasn’t so reckless as to cause the accident either. He was literally in the wrong place at the wrong time. From the evidence gathered, this accident and outcome would have happened if Stallworth had been sober. As luck would have it, he tested positive and was found as being under the influence.
    If Stallworth had been so blitzed that he single handedly caused the accident, I’d agree the punishment should be much stiffer. It’s simply not the case here.

  18. gruntersdad says: Aug 13, 2009 2:56 PM

    Surefooted, probably because what Vick did was 100 % intentional. Not an accident.

  19. twindaddy says: Aug 13, 2009 3:12 PM

    Why does he get automatically reinstated? Why wouldn’t it be conditional as was Vick’s? Are you telling me driving drunk and killing someone is less heinous than willfully killing dogs?
    ***********************************************
    Stallworth also stayed on the scene and cooperated fully with law enforcement officials. Vick did not. He lied to police and lied to the commish and only changed his story when three of his “friends” ratted him out.
    Also, as SpartaChris points out, Stallworth’s was a one time accident. Vick deliberately killed dogs and ran an illegal gambling operation for more than 6 years. He broke state AND federal laws.

  20. LightningStrikes says: Aug 13, 2009 3:27 PM

    To those of you who fail to see the distinction between what Michael Vick and Donte Stallworth did:
    Michael Vick intended to torture and murder dogs.
    I seriously doubt Donte Stallworth intended to kill Mr Reyes even though he was DUI.
    There, does that clear things up for you?

  21. vladameer says: Aug 13, 2009 3:52 PM

    I think the NFL needs to change it’s name to the FWT (Felons With Talent). My god, how can the NFL powers that be let this idiot continue to pursue his career when he was responsible for taking a life. I hated Mike Brown for letting Chris Henry back on the Cincinnati Bengals and the NFL for basically condoning it by letting it happen. He pointed a loaded weapon at a police officer among other felonies for crying out loud. I think it’s a direct slap in the face to the many good young men who play pro football to allow these miscreants to be on the same field with them. I blame the players union as well for not setting higher standards for themselves too.

  22. Our Human not so american Shame says: Aug 13, 2009 4:00 PM

    twitter is for twits

  23. Miamiman says: Aug 13, 2009 4:36 PM

    What he did was disgusting and irresponsible. He knew better than that. HE got a slap on the wrist for his crime when anybody else would have gotten the proper sentence which is what he should have gotten. Mr.Reyes’s life is over and nothing or noboby is going to bring him back. But he gets to live on and continue to be as irresponsible as always. It is time that these professional players of any sport stop thinking they are above the law.. Cause they are not. The next time someone gets arrested for DUI try and tell the judge that you want the same setence that DS got. You probably will get laughed at and thrown in jail and forgotten about. HE SHOULD NEVER EVER AGAIN BE ALLOWED TO PLAY IN THE NFL AGAIN.

  24. Royedw says: Aug 13, 2009 4:38 PM

    Folks,
    Big Stretch & Autumn Wind are correct!! There are extenuating circumstances here, Dante did everything “by the book” once the accident occurred. These are not the actions of a “thug” or whatever else you holier than thou (alleged) fans want to call him.
    Fans are becoming worse and worse in this country and one of the reasons I’m starting to enjoy watching sports in my favorite sports bar instead of going to the stadiums,.. and I worked TV sports for a career!
    Let any one of you who has NOT erred somewhere in your own life cast the first stone,.. you need to look in a mirror and take an honest look at yourselves first…

  25. PolegoJim says: Aug 13, 2009 5:01 PM

    Stallworth handled it like a man and straight up.
    Unfortunate circumstance for both.
    And hey, frankly he’s entitled to the emotions and feelings. It’s just foolish that he chose to rant on Twitter.
    Twitter? Twitter? You’ve got to have some friends you can purge to in confidence or something, right? I mean come on, Twitter?
    What is accomplished by Twittering the emotion and making yourself look like an insensitive jerk? When a life is lost, discretion should prevail in large measures and doses.

  26. tom coughlin's coat holder says: Aug 13, 2009 5:16 PM

    twittering and stupidity are a marriage made in heaven.
    to even go near a mention of this tragedy is the height of idiocy on stallworth’s part.he should just be quiet and thankful he got the treatment he got.he should get down on his knees and kiss the ground that david cornwell walks upon.

  27. Clevelander says: Aug 13, 2009 5:24 PM

    This place has turned into the TMZ of football. I’m done with it.

  28. realityonetwo says: Aug 13, 2009 5:38 PM

    You mean… “Donte Stallworth’s lawyer has released a more traditional statement.”
    If ever you needed proof that these dumb jock athletes never write their own statements, just compare Stallworth’s real-life tweet to this fictional statement.
    Bye, bye, Donte. We’ll see your annually underachieving, disappointing butt in 2010.
    Unless you kill someone else in the meantime.

  29. realityonetwo says: Aug 13, 2009 5:39 PM

    SomeIDIOT wrote…
    Ok wait a minute here. Stallworth hit a man who was jaywalking in a seriously tragic form of events. Do you people really think he didnt try to miss the guy or didnt try to stop?
    —-
    Yeah, I think he didn’t try to miss the guy. He was DRUNK, you fool.

  30. Joe in Raleigh says: Aug 13, 2009 5:40 PM

    Handled it like a man…. WTF??
    He flashed his lights and honked instead of slamming on his breaks before he murdered a guy. Everyone saw him do it, so he confessed. That’s not handling it like a man — that’s just getting caught. Big difference.
    He compounds it by making a fool of himself on Twitter and then asking someone who speaks English to write a press release for him.

  31. Don2 says: Aug 13, 2009 6:06 PM

    I am NOT saying that this is the problem in this case but the NFL could go a long way to helping to minimize the trouble that the players get into by pushing back HARD on the colleges. Why you ask? Many of the players “graduating” college with “degrees” in reality would be lucky to pass high school. They for the most part “graduated” and got their “degrees” on athletic ability alone. Very few colleges anymore have a minimum grade policy in order to play. Even if they did the teachers are told to pass them so they can play ball and their is no bad press. It’s all about the money and only the money. By the colleges putting the best athletes on the field they get more money because they are a better team, they get better TV money. They also get better recruitment because they are a “good team” even if half their players have a 6th grade education. Would it completely solve the problem? Absolutely not! Even the most highly truly educated can be stupid. It would though help the situation immensely. It is a proven fact that lower educated people get in more trouble than the more educated. But then we of course can’t solve this problem because of the immovable object in the way. MONEY!!!

  32. RNdaSilva says: Aug 13, 2009 6:40 PM

    AutumnWind999
    Well said.
    Thanks, saved a lot of wear and tear on these tired old digital appendages from having to echo a similar response.

  33. GeniusJoe says: Aug 14, 2009 9:49 AM

    You all need to remember the most important fact. The Reyes family, under Florida law, needed to sign off and agree with the deal!
    They knew the facts and accepted the shared responsibility. They also know that if Donte is in jail he won’t be able to fulfill the financial obligation to them.
    Goodell should have taken that fact into account. It is better for the family if Donte is earning money. Since he can’t bring Reyes back to life.

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