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NFL partially waives blackout rule

Though the NFL has consistently said that it won’t lift the rule preventing games that aren’t sold out from being televised in the local market, the league has made a major concession in this regard.

All blacked out games will be available in the local markets on a tape-delayed basis, via NFL.com. 

The free “re-broadcasts” (as the league is calling them) will be accessible at midnight on the day of the game, and they will remain available for 72 hours.

The re-broadcasts will not be available during the Monday Night Football broadcast.

Also, the Red Zone Channel on DirecTV and the similar NFL RedZone product that has been purchased by Dish Network, Comcast, and other providers will include look-ins featuring the blacked-out games.  This means that folks who have the Red Zone Channel or NFL RedZone in the markets where the games won’t be shown will be able to see snippets of the game long before midnight.


“We understand that the economy is limiting some families and corporations from buying as many game tickets as they had previously,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in a release.  “These free re-broadcasts on NFL.com will allow our fans that can’t get to a blacked-out game an opportunity to see the entire game.”

Though some will still claim that the NFL should remove the blackout rule entirely, the significance of this concession should not be underestimated.  The league zealously guards its game footage; the fact that the NFL is willing to re-broadcast the blacked-out games via NFL.com at no charge represents an unprecedented gesture.

Meanwhile, we predict that a rash of fans in the blacked-out markets will be avoiding all forms of media until midnight, at which time they can watch the game involving the home team as if it’s happening live.

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55 Responses to “NFL partially waives blackout rule”
  1. lqhybird25 says: Sep 10, 2009 10:52 AM

    doesn’t help people who have Time warner cable. Oh well I’ll be at the game anyways.

  2. leatherneck says: Sep 10, 2009 11:00 AM

    Midnight. 12:00 AM. Monday morning. September 14.
    Every NFL.com server instantly grinds to a halt.
    9:53 AM. Same day. NFL announces free re-broadcasts now cost $4.95 per game. Revenues to be distributed equally among teams. The problem is resolved.
    That’s my prediction.

  3. LiveNBreatheFootball says: Sep 10, 2009 11:00 AM

    Woohoo. Does this mean anyone can catch the games online? You know for those of us without tv?

  4. Bob Nelson says: Sep 10, 2009 11:01 AM

    Good news for Jacksonville and Minnesota.

  5. swede700 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:01 AM

    That’s a good compromise. Now only if both sides of Congress could do the same thing with health care, we’d be set. :)

  6. killachap says: Sep 10, 2009 11:01 AM

    “We understand that the economy is limiting some families and corporations from buying as many game tickets as they had previously,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in a release. “These free re-broadcasts on NFL.com will allow our fans that can’t get to a blacked-out game an opportunity to see the entire game.”
    Wow, thanks Rog. I mean come on now you schmuck. What arrogance. Local taxpayers front the bill for these stadiums and then you cant even let them see the games? This is arrogance at it’s finest. I say keep the games broadcasted locally. It’s not like the people who already brought tickets wont go to the game just because its on TV. Or how about making the game affordable to take a family of 4 to. Either way prove that its about the fans and for the fans.

  7. Champ Kind with Sports says: Sep 10, 2009 11:03 AM

    Florio
    You really think that in this day and age, with fantasy football and constant game updates everywhere, that there will be more than a couple dozen people nation wide who actually avoid finding out what happens in their game until midnight?

  8. thebandit27 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:06 AM

    This rule is BS…if the fans in Buffalo can sell out the season to avoid blackouts then so can the fans everywhere else.

  9. lebowski says: Sep 10, 2009 11:08 AM

    And in Minnesota, there was much rejoicing…

  10. sand0 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:09 AM

    Being a Vikings fan I don’t really need to worry about this. It has been a very long time since an actual blackout here. Even though there are all these “scares” every year I have yet to pay attention to one of them and have been rewarded with watching the game on the couch whenever I want.
    But I still think this is sort of a good thing. What would be even better is if they just dropped the ridiculous rule. Economy is crap and families and companies can’t be expected to just drop $80 a head on nose bleed tickets.
    The NFL should drop the blackout rule until the recession is over. I am not so sure the rule even has any effect whatsoever. I am not so sure the rule is even worth it when you consider the fact that it garners so much negative attention and if a game is actually blacked out they lose money on ads.

  11. Alfie says: Sep 10, 2009 11:10 AM

    @Bob Nelson – and San Diego, Oakland, San Francisco, Cleveland, Atlanta, Tampa Bay, etc.

  12. Jungle Juice says: Sep 10, 2009 11:10 AM

    They should offer a pay-per-view TV option for blacked out games. Say $20. That would more than make up for the lost revenue.

  13. CrypticNonSequiturGuy says: Sep 10, 2009 11:11 AM

    “Meanwhile, we predict that a rash of fans in the blacked-out markets will be avoiding all forms of media until midnight, at which time they can watch the game involving the home team as if it’s happening live.”
    This is much harder than it sounds…I try doing it every year for the pre-season games that are replayed on NFLN, and it’s damn near impossible.
    Between TV, internet/e-mail, radio, and just casual, random chatter–it’s almost inevitable the game outcome gets leaked/spoiled.
    At least the league has done something, though.
    Do hippos have nipples? And if so, are they the size of dinner plates?

  14. Alfie says: Sep 10, 2009 11:11 AM

    @killachap
    I could be wrong, but I’m pretty sure the NFL has to keep the blackout rule to avoid Anti-Trust issues.

  15. lateralus82 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:12 AM

    @LiveNBreatheFootball stoogetv.com, myp2p.eu and atdhe.net are great sites

  16. SpartaChris says: Sep 10, 2009 11:16 AM

    killachap says:
    September 10, 2009 11:01 AM
    Wow, thanks Rog. I mean come on now you schmuck. What arrogance. Local taxpayers front the bill for these stadiums and then you cant even let them see the games? This is arrogance at it’s finest. I say keep the games broadcasted locally. It’s not like the people who already brought tickets wont go to the game just because its on TV. Or how about making the game affordable to take a family of 4 to. Either way prove that its about the fans and for the fans.
    ====================================
    Oh Boo friggin hoo. Don’t make it sound like local taxpayers don’t benefit by having the stadium in town. Local taxpayers see the benefits of a new stadium in terms of employment and tax dollars generated from revenues and tourism funneled back into the local economy.
    Plus it’s rare for local tax payers to front the entire cost of a new stadium. Generally they pick up maybe 50% of the tab while the team owner and other investors pick up the other 50%.
    Plus it’s not like you’re forced to vote for it. If you don’t want tax dollars going to a new stadium, don’t vote for it.

  17. eaglesinnc says: Sep 10, 2009 11:19 AM

    How gracious of the NFL. Now if only those money grubbers can work with the money grubbers at Time Warner and show the damn NFL Network, we’ll be all set. I can watch black out games on the web and some Thursday night games later in the year on tv. Life would be grand.

  18. dawk20db says: Sep 10, 2009 11:20 AM

    Oh c’mon Mike. This is not going to help anyone. I don’t think the NFL should lift the blackouts, but this is just a slap in the face of everybody that will not be able to watch their favorite team.
    Really? Midnight? Might as well wait until it replays on NFL Network. Clearly its a hollow ploy aimed at defusing some of the uproar.

  19. Youngone says: Sep 10, 2009 11:24 AM

    Proof reading is an important part of writing: “game of the game”

  20. damnitall says: Sep 10, 2009 11:25 AM

    Ummm, games on Sunday afternoon. Since I work first shift, and can’t stay up until midnight to watch a taped game, chances of me not hearing what the score was before 6:00 PM Monday are slim to none. Nothing better than watching a game you already know the outcome to. Only thing this does for the fan is it let’s them watch the game in an hour instead of 3 hours.

  21. TLyons4 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:26 AM

    Don’t people have radios anymore?

  22. killachap says: Sep 10, 2009 11:27 AM

    @Sparta
    Obviously the tax payers dont pick up the entire tab. Jesus, the repsonses today on this website are lacking in common sense and intelligence. The point is obvious, the fans deserve the right to watch the games of their local team. Plain and damn simple. And the fact that the NFL cant make games affordable, maybe 20 bucks for the nosebleeds and 3 bucks for a burger, then they should let the people watch it on tv.

  23. Fan_Of_ Four says: Sep 10, 2009 11:36 AM

    Big Deal !
    If you truly want A$$es in the seats reduce ticket prices in those hard hit markets. Every other business in America has cut costs to increase sales.

  24. faulkn22 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:39 AM

    This is pretty lame in my opinion, and really isn’t a concession at all, just a ploy that looks like a concession by the NFL.
    They aren’t stupid. They already know that there are websites out there, both free and not free, ahem, that stream blacked out games live (live, not at midnight Monday morning when we are sleeping before work).
    They know that they don’t make money on the folks that watch these streams, and so if they are already losing money, they’ll act like you are doing the fans a favor a just give them something that is already being done. They don’t lose a penny (or gain one) but look like they are doing the fans a favor.
    You want to do us a favor; broadcast the games as they are scheduled, and plan to make your money back when the economy bounces back. It’s not like the league is doing bad at the moment (top rated sport in the country).
    Yeah, like anyone is going to wait until midnight to watch. They won’t see the score when they make adjustments to their fantasy football teams. They won’t see the score when the streamer runs at the bottom of the screen of the game they’re being forced to watch. They won’t see the score when the local news highlights the big plays of the game…. They’re so far out of touch that it makes me sick to my stomach.
    The NFL is taking the wrong stance on this.

  25. texasPHINSfan says: Sep 10, 2009 11:41 AM

    lame. watching it streaming on NFL.com isn’t the same as watching it on the big screen.
    those of us with comcast are screwed either way.

  26. Whodey08 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:42 AM

    As a former Bengals ticket holder (screw you evil Mikey Brown) and new Red Zone customer I think this is great.

  27. eulldog75 says: Sep 10, 2009 11:46 AM

    I think the NFL really doesn’t understand how expensive it is for a normal fan to go to an NFL game. I am 28 and a life long Vikings fan and I have been to one game in my life. It’s not because I don’t want to go, it’s because it costs $100+ to go to a game. I feel that people who pay to go to the games would still go if there was a blackout rule or not. I think it is sad that the NFL has arguably the most loyal fans of any sport but they treat them like crap just because they can.

  28. dmart says: Sep 10, 2009 11:46 AM

    You can watch all NFL Games Online at http://www.yourteamlive.com
    If you can’t afford NFL ticket, this is the best alternative to ensure that you get to see your team play if your unable to view the game from your local affiliate.

  29. soundmind says: Sep 10, 2009 11:49 AM

    Killachap: I agree entirely.
    They’ve essentially paved the road to lose a ton of fans, and a ton of money. This blackout rule is absurd, and given the current condition of things economically, they’d be wisest to lift the blackout rule entirely.
    Think about it, they’ve basically said, even though you paid for this stadium twice over in tax dollars, we decided to price tickets at $70 seat (small markets), parking at $25, and make roughly 7000% profit on food/drink at the stadium….and if you can’t afford to show up for that, then we’re going to deny you our product.
    You know what, cool. You can kick back that $130M in local tax dollars you used this summer. There are more than a few people that could use your loose change.

  30. SpartaChris says: Sep 10, 2009 11:52 AM

    killachap says:
    September 10, 2009 11:27 AM
    @Sparta
    Obviously the tax payers dont pick up the entire tab. Jesus, the repsonses today on this website are lacking in common sense and intelligence. The point is obvious, the fans deserve the right to watch the games of their local team. Plain and damn simple. And the fact that the NFL cant make games affordable, maybe 20 bucks for the nosebleeds and 3 bucks for a burger, then they should let the people watch it on tv.
    =====================================
    I’m not arguing that ticket prices could/should come down in some markets. It’s basic supply and demand. I think there are some complications with lowering ticket prices, but for the most part I think they could come down.
    But your whining about local tax payers not getting to see every game for free because your tax dollars payed for a portion of a stadium is complete and total nonsense. I’ve already pointed out how tax payers benefit more by partially funding a stadium, making it an equal give and take. Your complaint is now you want the product for free.
    Let me ask you this- If the league lifted the blackout rule, what incentive would there be for fans to go to the stadium? That’s right, none.
    And if there’s no incentive to go to see the game in person, how can you possibly expect the team to make money and stay in business?
    You can bitch, piss, moan and whine all you want about blackouts, but the bottom line is if fans don’t show up to support their team, their team is eventually going to move to a market that will.
    But hey, you’ll get to continue to watch from home. Idiot.

  31. soundmind says: Sep 10, 2009 11:54 AM

    Furthermore, does the MLB only broadcast sold out games??? How in the world am I still watching Royals games if this is how the sporting world is to operate?
    Ahh, professional grade collusion. Bless America.

  32. El Duderino says: Sep 10, 2009 11:58 AM

    WOW…I’m amazed you could avoid placing “Good News Jacksonville” in the headline as well. You shock us all sometimes Mike!

  33. Seeryer says: Sep 10, 2009 12:14 PM

    This is a pretty weak concession if it can even be called that. A real concession would have been no back to back blackouts in loacal markets. Meaning, if the Bengals are blacked out this week, their next home game would not be subject to a blackout. Don’t piss in my face and tell me it’s raining Gooddell. What a cheerleader you are Florio. Is the league paying you or NBC?

  34. leatherneck says: Sep 10, 2009 12:24 PM

    The NFL is only going to wake up to the problem of high ticket prices when the Super Bowl is blacked out.

  35. Great Smoky says: Sep 10, 2009 12:34 PM

    I don’t think this helps the people who will be most harmed by the blackouts: working-class fans who have basic cable or antenna reception. This sizeable (according to the NFL) demographic likely doesn’t crossover much with the high-speed internet / late-model PC / trendy mobile device demo.
    This season presents a great opportunity for the NFL to temporarily lift the blackout rule, as a pilot project. The League should seize this opportunity and see if eliminating blackouts might bear fruit.
    The blackout rule has for years made me question the logic of placing yet another team in Los Angeles. With attendance what it was for the Rams and Raiders, how in the world does it make sense to put a team back there? The local TV market (which is always the top prize mentioned by the NFL in reference to its desire to return to LA) can’t have seen much of those teams when they were there.

  36. SpartaChris says: Sep 10, 2009 12:48 PM

    soundmind says:
    September 10, 2009 11:54 AM
    Furthermore, does the MLB only broadcast sold out games??? How in the world am I still watching Royals games if this is how the sporting world is to operate?
    Ahh, professional grade collusion. Bless America.
    =====================================
    Yeah, not an accurate comparison. Baseball plays, what, 80 games at home? Compared to 8 or 10 if you count the pre-season?
    The sheer volume of games played at home by MLB teams make up for the lack of game by game attendance. It also allows them to sell games much cheaper than the NFL can.
    I don’t get what’s so hard to understand about this. NFL teams have 10 opportunities to generate enough revenues to cover operating expenses. That’s it- 10. The NBA and NHL have 40 and MLB has 80. Local blackouts are really the only leverage teams have to try and get as many people to come to the game as possible. I know they aren’t pleasant, and I agree prices could/should come down in a depressed economy. But considering the amount of games played, ticket prices can only come down so low before teams start running in the red. Sooner or later, those teams who continuously fail to sell out and generate revenue are going to have to make some tough business decisions.

  37. hotchick says: Sep 10, 2009 12:52 PM

    Yes, this solution is about as good as any compromise that will come out of congress on healthcare. Its meaningless.
    Want to watch the game “re-braodcasted?” Well dont watch any other game live. Since it will flash the score of your local game in the corner of your screen.

  38. SpartaChris says: Sep 10, 2009 1:01 PM

    @Great Smoky-
    If the NFL lifted the blackouts, what incentive would fans have to spend money on the team? How would teams be able to make money from this?
    The problem is, if they do it once, they’d have to keep doing it. And you can’t lift the blackout rule for just a couple of teams without lifting it for the entire league. Otherwise it could be viewed as giving preferential treatment.

  39. kramer says: Sep 10, 2009 1:24 PM

    weak roger….the proverbial bone being tossed…sans any meat

  40. corsair82 says: Sep 10, 2009 1:41 PM

    To Sparta: You assume then that your team won’t make the playoffs if there are only 10 chances to make money. Most Professional teams make their money from the TV, merchandising, etc, not from the income for the games they play at home.
    Leatherhead: The Superbowl would never be blacked out all that ,money is made from the ADS.
    Killachap:
    you are a moron. Each team sets the prices not the NFL. Know your facts before opening your mouth.

  41. Quagmire says: Sep 10, 2009 1:45 PM

    The NFL needs to back off on blacking out games.
    I’ve watched many a local baseball, hockey & basketball game with more seats empty than filled.
    The NFL is wrong on continuing the blackouts…especially in this economy.

  42. Tdk24 says: Sep 10, 2009 1:48 PM

    They better find a way to keep games availible without buying costly pay-per-view games. Just like anything, Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The NFL can’t afford that.

  43. SaintMichael says: Sep 10, 2009 1:52 PM

    I’m tired of intellectually lazy people saying that it costs $80 for nosebleed tickets, and that a famly of 4 can’t attend an NFL game for under $400 bucks.
    It’s simply not true. I don’t think any stadium in the entire league has the cheapest ticket at over $50. The Saints, Vikings, 49ers, Bills, Colts all have tickets at under $30 a pop. Most teams have tens of thousands for under $50.

  44. SaintMichael says: Sep 10, 2009 1:55 PM

    I don’t understand how so many of you criticize the blackout rule. Part of what makes the NFL the undisputed king of all sports is that EVERY GAME SELLS OUT.
    If we get back to the point where 33% of games aren’t selling out than the NFL is going to panic – and with good reason. They need to protect their product and blacking out games makes local fans put their money where their mouth is.
    Personally, I cant wait until next season when the Cowboys have several home games in that monstrosity of a stadium backed out. That will truly make me grin with delight.

  45. UFL FOOTBALL RULES says: Sep 10, 2009 2:27 PM

    The NFL SUCKS. Its going down the tubes.
    There are better venues out there. The UFL is cheaper. Tuskers vs Redwoods is much better and cheaper.
    We dont need the NFL.

  46. bustahead says: Sep 10, 2009 2:46 PM

    “Personally, I cant wait until next season when the Cowboys have several home games in that monstrosity of a stadium backed out. That will truly make me grin with delight”.
    Once again a hater shows his ignorance because of his envy! The new stadium will EXPAND to hold 100K. Jerry doesn’t have to sell 100K tickets to avoid a black out. In fact up to 30K is for standing room only called party passes sold for $29 a ticket. Also, that “monstrosity” as you call it is a source of pride for ALL the fans of the Silver and Blue!! It truly is a marvel to see.

  47. Valerie says: Sep 10, 2009 2:52 PM

    I live in Jax – there are seven in the extended family, we buy three nose bleed tickets. The rest of us are just screwed. The only thing the Jags did wrong was build a statium, looking to the future, with too many seats. The NFL needs to do more of a number of seats to population ratio before blacking out. We struggle every year. Winn Dixie (our local supermarket) buys the extra tickets almost every year so we will be broadcast. But with the economy it was just too much this year. I understand the blacking out concept, but there needs to better criteria.

  48. soundmind says: Sep 10, 2009 2:55 PM

    Saint Michael: “If we get back to the point where 33% of games aren’t selling out than the NFL is going to panic – and with good reason. They need to protect their product and blacking out games makes local fans put their money where their mouth is.”
    ————————-
    Protect their product? From who? They need to protect their product from themselves. Every season they line up another 7 changes to the rules or the league….IT’S NOT BROKEN!!!
    Then we enter this blackout conversation, and their solution to best advertise their product and get you out to the game, is to not show you the game? Leverage? How many people age 2-90 do you see wearing jerseys? Hats? T-Shirts, Hoodies, Flags, Grills….I mean really? This is nearly the same thing as trying to sell me that our gas prices fluctuate with the cost of crude oil.
    Child please.
    Lift the blackout. Keep all your fans happy and active, spending what they can afford to on your product (ie. Game Tickets, food/drink, merch, Retail: Jerseys, Hats, Hoodies….). Those who can afford to go to the game will, believe me.

  49. Great Smoky says: Sep 10, 2009 3:17 PM

    @SpartaChris, et al.
    If the NFL lifted blackouts temporarily, incentives would remain for attendance in person. If the only incentive to attend is the threat of not being able to watch on TV, then what is the incentive to watch on TV?
    The incentive to spectate (in person or remotely) begins with an interest in the sport of football, followed by a rooting interest in a particular team. Then value judgments, cost considerations, and personal preferences factor in the decision to go to the stadium or watch on television. The League smartly monetizes every method of spectatorship it can conceive of.
    A temporary lift of blackouts would provide a concession to customers during difficult economic times; might generate goodwill with customers; and could reinvigorate flagging interest in markets where teams are struggling with attendance. Also, I think a prolonged absence from TV is a downward spiral. If I owned a team like the Jags, I would rather take a relatively small gamble (since ticket sales are poor already) and see if remaining on TV reliably would stimulate interest in the team. The TV broadcasts effectively serve as lengthy promotions for the teams themselves; why stop promoting when you most need to be doing it?
    Removing a team from TV because ticket sales are poor seems disingenuous. Teams that have poor ticket sales tend to have have poor TV ratings as well, as viewers enact their own personal blackouts. Again with Jacksonville as an example, their attendance problems didn’t start because they “gave away” too many games on TV; they started when they fired a successful coach who went on to win a Super Bowl elsewhere, started wearing ugly uniforms in too many combinations, and began losing a lot more games than the fans liked, especially when compared to the 1990′s when, not coincidentally, the Jags were among the NFL’s attendance leaders.
    Being removed from TV might translate into ticket sales (through negative reinforcement), but I wager that offering some combination of a good team, good prices, good promotions, a good stadium experience, and good customer relations (positive reinforcement) are far more important. My argument is that it makes sense from a business standpoint to experiment — on a limited, temporary basis — with lifting blackouts in an attempt to please customers, promote teams, and stimulate ticket and ad sales.

  50. cmelton says: Sep 10, 2009 4:37 PM

    “some towns are football towns and some towns are museum towns. I guess Baltimore is a museum town.” – Paul Tagliabue
    Looking that the markets that are facing broadcast black outs really serves to remind me how much disdain I have for Paul Tagliabue. I guess a city that has never faced a blackout, has sold out every game and has a waiting list to be on the season ticket waiting list must really not be a football town.

  51. ChitownMatt says: Sep 10, 2009 5:17 PM

    This is a very public demonstration of very poor management of the NFL as a entertainment corporation.
    If the tickets are not selling it is because the price is too high. It is that simple. PERIOD.
    By holding the televised games hostage in an attempt to force fans to buy tickets, they are giving up the advertising revenue from broadcast and they are further contributing to the declining public interest in that market City.
    Who the h3ll wants to buy tickets to a professional sporting event that isn’t on TV???

  52. phatso2e says: Sep 10, 2009 5:39 PM

    I never knew a rule like this existed. I think it is a shame to NFL fans all over.
    I attended my first NFL game last season in Atlanta vs the Detroit Lions. My first game after living in Atlanta for 9 years. I went simply to experience the game, the crowd and the atmosphere of being at a real game.
    I would tend to think that’s why any fan would go see a game at the stadium. What if I would rather stay at home and watch it on my couch? Why can’t I have that choice?
    I think this blackout rule is ridiculous and the NFL needs to stop being so greedy. They are already making absurd amounts of money. This mostly hurts the local fans and their communities.

  53. trustbuster says: Sep 11, 2009 8:39 AM

    Obviously the short term solution would be for blacked out fans to create Napster like networks to stream video feeds online from outside their area. I suggest long range strategy to break this government sanctioned trust for good. Persuade the Canadian Football league to aggressively attack their market. Change name to All American Football League. Adopt NFL rules entire. Pick off least viable franchises and move to Canadian cities in nearby markets. The Detroit Lions of Windsor, Ontario for example. When teams hit down cycles, with frequent blackouts, buy them. Imagine the San Diego, Chargers of Tijuana, Mexico, The Seattle Seahawks of Vancouver, BC, etc. Imagine luring prospects with no interest in funding the BCS/Big Ed monoply. All true fans know they need to broken, since they are protected, indulged, and abusive of our interests. If not the CFL, who? If not now, WHEN???

  54. trustbuster says: Sep 11, 2009 8:51 AM

    Obviously the short term solution would be for blacked out fans to create Napster like networks to stream video feeds online from outside their area. I suggest long range strategy to break this government sanctioned trust for good. Persuade the Canadian Football league to aggressively attack their market. Change name to All American Football League. Adopt NFL rules entire. Pick off least viable franchises and move to Canadian cities in nearby markets. The Detroit Lions of Windsor, Ontario for example. When teams hit down cycles, with frequent blackouts, buy them. Imagine the San Diego, Chargers of Tijuana, Mexico, The Seattle Seahawks of Vancouver, BC, etc. Imagine luring prospects with no interest in funding the BCS/Big Ed monoply. All true fans know they need to be broken, since they are protected, indulged, and abusive of our interests. If not the CFL, who? If not now, WHEN???

  55. dat crazy bok says: Sep 11, 2009 3:10 PM

    This just goes to show what kind of people we have running the NFL. If you can’t afford a ticket, don’t watch. They’re not even just telling us we can’t watch, they’re making it impossible.
    Thanks NFL. In this time of a rough economy, you’re showing who really matters to you. Luckily, I could afford tickets to the Cardinals games, if I wanted to go. (I’m holding out for the Sooners to return again in the Fiesta Bowl) But there are thousands of people in Phoenix who can’t. Way to create another generation of bandwagon hopping, fair-weather fans, NFL. Each generation, the fans are growing less passionate, and less loyal because of rules like this.
    Can’t wait for it to bite you on your butt when the next generation simply doesn’t care about the NFL.

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