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League’s reaction to StarCaps ruling focuses on disparity

In the wake of Friday’s decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit that Saints defensive ends Charles Grant and Will Smith will be suspended for taking StarCaps and Vikings defensive tackles Pat and Kevin Williams won’t, the NFL’s reaction centers on the obvious differences in treatment, and the union’s role in letting it happen.

“The real losers today are the players on 31 other clubs,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said via e-mail, “who no longer live under the same rules as players on the Minnesota Vikings — a result of the NFL Players Association’s failure to stand behind the program it negotiated with the league, and for which it has properly claimed credit with fans and before Congress.  The most respected program in sports has been put in jeopardy by the NFL union’s silence and today’s ruling.”

In our view, however, the union had no choice but to join in the attack on the steroids policy, given the possibility that the union would have faced a lawsuit of its own for agreeing to allow the Commissioner to serve as judge, jury, executioner, appeals court, and governor when it comes to the determination of whether a player violated the policy.

But the league has a point.  It’s hard for the union to claim it has helped craft a policy that gets tough on cheaters while at the same time fighting the very rules that demonstrate such toughness.

And to the extent that the NFL is concerned about differences in treatment between players on the Vikings and players with other teams, lawyer David Cornwell (who represents the Saints players who’ll serve their suspensions) has a suggestion — give the Saints players a pass on this one.

Said Cornwell via e-mail, “The same rational (uniformity) that compelled the NFL to argue against application of the Minnesota statute should also compel the NFL to refrain from suspending Charles [Grant] and Will [Smith].”

It’s highly unlikely that the league will see it this way, and thus the Saints players will be suspended and the Vikings players won’t.

In the end, it’s simply a matter of dumb luck for the Vikings.  Minnesota has a statute that gives employees specific protections against drug testing, and Louisiana doesn’t.

As Cornwell points out, however, Louisiana has a similar law, but Louisiana provides an exemption to the NFL and the NCAA.

The moral of the story?  Better lobbying efforts in the Twin Cities might have secured a similar exemption in Minnesota.

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58 Responses to “League’s reaction to StarCaps ruling focuses on disparity”
  1. Skeety says: Sep 11, 2009 4:32 PM

    isn’t it obvious? the NFL looked stupid and now they’re pissed.. the Vikings got a lawyer and fought while the saints didn’t do much at all..
    The NFL is just pouting..

  2. Burritto says: Sep 11, 2009 4:32 PM

    The moral of the story is that unions are obsolete clusters of evildoers who are leading simps.

  3. norseman jeff says: Sep 11, 2009 4:38 PM

    It’s about time they “lucked out”. This franchise has been cursed for years. Four SB Losses, Les Steckel, Herschel “last Spoke in the Wheel” Trade, Red McCombs, Love Boat, “Straight cash homey”, The ’98 season (Anderson) choke, Need I say more………

  4. Tomb says: Sep 11, 2009 4:40 PM

    Goodell’s tears are like sweet nectar.

  5. CashIsKing says: Sep 11, 2009 4:42 PM

    So if a Viking used steroids at his house and tested positive at the workplace, he would still be able to play? They’ll be having steroid parties on boats soon…

  6. solman says: Sep 11, 2009 4:46 PM

    IMPORTANT POINT:
    The Minnesota players are not avoiding punishment because of the unique circumstances of the Sky Caps case. They are avoiding punishment because the ENTIRE NFL drug testing program is now subject to challenge under Minnesota state statutes.
    If a Viking is now caught doping, and has absolutely no mitigating circumstances whatsoever, he can still sue under Minnesota statute, and defer punishment for at least a year, if not forever.
    MAYBE the NFL could get lucky and convince a judge not to issue a TRO. But with players’ careers hanging in the balance, probably not.

  7. severs28 says: Sep 11, 2009 4:47 PM

    Florio
    Where does Grady Jackson fall in all of this?

  8. Mark0226 says: Sep 11, 2009 4:48 PM

    NFL needs to implement discipline equally across the board. They should punt on this one and close the loophole for Minnesota for any future infractions.

  9. b0knows says: Sep 11, 2009 4:49 PM

    I wonder if this would apply to the Twins and the Wild as well.
    As it stands right now, the Vikes could put all their guys on roids.

  10. Albatross says: Sep 11, 2009 4:50 PM

    Why should the NFL be exempted from the employee drug testing law? Their attitude throughout this has been infuriating – “You are prohibited from taking banned substances, but we won’t tell you which ones are banned.” That’s not acceptable in my workplace or any workplace.

  11. Jumbotron84 says: Sep 11, 2009 4:52 PM

    Sounds like they are just trying to hose over the Lions.
    We’ll suspend the Saints players…after they play the lions.
    Whats that? The lions play the vikes the second week? Well we better let them play ‘em.
    By the way, lets give them the toughest schedule to boot. I mean, the vikes, bears, and pack kinda have the easy schedule cause they play the lions twice, so it all is balanced out.
    The only team to go 0-16 has to play the two superbowl teams.
    Makes sense.

  12. moose68 says: Sep 11, 2009 4:56 PM

    Happens all the time across the country when business operate in different states. Company rules are applied to the employees and adjustments for specific states are made. If the NFL was too dense to find a way to make their policies legal in Minnesota it is their own fault.

  13. creelington says: Sep 11, 2009 4:58 PM

    yawn….get over it GODdell…..

  14. jimicos says: Sep 11, 2009 5:01 PM

    Skeety says:
    September 11, 2009 4:32 PM
    isn’t it obvious? the NFL looked stupid and now they’re pissed.. the Vikings got a lawyer and fought while the saints didn’t do much at all..
    The NFL is just pouting..
    ——————————
    You’re absolutely right. The NEW ORLEANS Saints should’ve argued that they should be governed by MINNESOTA labor laws. That would’ve been a hoot.

  15. VoxVeritas says: Sep 11, 2009 5:01 PM

    Simple solution: Move the Vikings out of Minnesota and let everyone know that it’s their wacky backwoods cousin-f*cking laws that helped push the NFL out of that football wasteland forever.

  16. Sparrowhawk says: Sep 11, 2009 5:02 PM

    If the state of Minnesota is going to wink at the use of steroids or other drugs maybe it’s time for the NFL to hasten the franchise’s move to a different site. San Antonio or Los Angeles might be more inclined to understand the importance of employee drug testing regulations and compliance.

  17. jimicos says: Sep 11, 2009 5:03 PM

    Albatross says:
    September 11, 2009 4:50 PM
    Why should the NFL be exempted from the employee drug testing law? Their attitude throughout this has been infuriating – “You are prohibited from taking banned substances, but we won’t tell you which ones are banned.” That’s not acceptable in my workplace or any workplace.
    ——————————
    The NFL told them EXACTLY what was banned. And it was Bumetanide. And they took it.

  18. Ralph says: Sep 11, 2009 5:04 PM

    Heck, I think the NFL should be prosecuted as an accomplice to illegal drug trafficking.
    The banned substance in Star Caps is a prescription drug that was put into an over the counter product. That’s illegal, the NFL knew about it and said nothing, that’s pretty much the definition of the law. IF you know someone is breaking the law and you say nothing about it you can be prosecuted as an accessory to the crime.

  19. leatherneck says: Sep 11, 2009 5:04 PM

    Don’t blame the Vikings.
    Extend the same rules to all clubs in the next CBA.
    The NFL front office needs to grow up and stop whining.
    Respect the L-A-W. It’s what everybody else does.

  20. Thor says: Sep 11, 2009 5:05 PM

    I thought pro players were independent contractors and not employees. That is an important distinction as “employee protections” do not apply to contractors.

  21. ItalianStallion says: Sep 11, 2009 5:12 PM

    To all the people saying the Vikings player can/could all be put on steroids, you’re misunderstanding the Minnesota laws.
    The Williamses never tested positive for steroids or any (then) illegal substance. Starcaps was a legal supplement. Anabolic steroids without a prescription IS illegal.
    The law only protects repercussion to employees for testing positive for a legal substances.

  22. Kidekk says: Sep 11, 2009 5:14 PM

    jimicos says:
    September 11, 2009 5:01 PM
    Skeety says:
    September 11, 2009 4:32 PM
    isn’t it obvious? the NFL looked stupid and now they’re pissed.. the Vikings got a lawyer and fought while the saints didn’t do much at all..
    The NFL is just pouting..
    ——————————
    You’re absolutely right. The NEW ORLEANS Saints should’ve argued that they should be governed by MINNESOTA labor laws. That would’ve been a hoot.
    ————————
    What’s even more perplexing is that skeety didn’t realize that David Cornwell is the lawyer representing the Saints’ players in this case, per the article.
    Side note: How rich is David Cornwell getting? Isn’t he the same guy who represented Big Ben and Stallworth? If he is, this guy is everywhere. He’s like the Dr. James Andrews of Lawyers.

  23. StevieMo says: Sep 11, 2009 5:19 PM

    Time to roid up, Vikings. What’s to stop you?
    Of course, 99% of offensive linemen in the entire league use HGH, so what the hell.
    It’s like this: Use HGH, make $30 million; don’t use HGH, go home on cut-down day.
    What would you do?

  24. VegasChris says: Sep 11, 2009 5:23 PM

    Dear Greg Aiello, put down the sour candy.
    I can see your face right now, and it looks like you’ve been eating foil.

  25. jimicos says: Sep 11, 2009 5:24 PM

    The moral of the story? Better lobbying efforts in the Twin Cities might have secured a similar exemption in Minnesota.
    —————————
    Pshhhh! Better lobby efforts in the Twin Cities might have secured a Governor’s seat for Bozo the clown. They’ll vote in any idiot over there.

  26. mofo says: Sep 11, 2009 5:28 PM

    Jumbotron84, you took the words right outta my mouth.
    It’s farcical how this ruling so negatively effects the Lions.
    The only way it could be worse is for the court to realize it forgot something and hold an emergency session to rule Grady Jackson should also be suspended.
    Ah, but such is the life of a Lions fan.

  27. Josh says: Sep 11, 2009 5:36 PM

    Just to clarify, the Minnesota statute in question makes it unlawful for employers to suspend/fire employees for the use of LEGAL substances OUTSIDE OF THE WORKPLACE.
    This law would not allow any Vikings player to avoid suspension for using steroids or street drugs.
    Moreover, no one has actually ruled on whether the law will get the Williams’ off the hook. Instead, the announced ruling simply says that a challenge under a Minnesota law should be heard in a Minnesota court rather than a federal court.

  28. veistran says: Sep 11, 2009 5:42 PM

    What exactly is stopping the commish from just invoking the “Additionally, Covered Persons shall not by their words or conduct suggest that criminal activity is acceptable or condoned within the NFL.” portion of the personal conduct policy to suspend them that way?

  29. Mr Twin City says: Sep 11, 2009 5:42 PM

    The league is reaping its own bad karma here. By sitting on the info that StarCaps illegally contained a prescription diuretic and instead waiting for someone to take the product and fail the test the league did its employees wrong. So if this ruling is causing Godell a little indigestion it some how feels right, since it all could have been avoided with a little open and honest dialogue from the league office when it first found out what StarCaps was putting in their product without bothering to include on the ingredient label.

  30. JuicyMelon says: Sep 11, 2009 5:43 PM

    # VoxVeritas says: September 11, 2009 5:01 PM
    Simple solution: Move the Vikings out of Minnesota and let everyone know that it’s their wacky backwoods cousin-f*cking laws that helped push the NFL out of that football wasteland forever.
    Vox,
    A Cowboys fan should be the last person to talk smack about the Vikings or their fans.

  31. Albatross says: Sep 11, 2009 5:44 PM

    Albatross says:
    September 11, 2009 4:50 PM
    Why should the NFL be exempted from the employee drug testing law? Their attitude throughout this has been infuriating – “You are prohibited from taking banned substances, but we won’t tell you which ones are banned.” That’s not acceptable in my workplace or any workplace.
    ——————————
    jimicos says:
    September 11, 2009 5:03 PM
    The NFL told them EXACTLY what was banned. And it was Bumetanide. And they took it.
    ———————
    They took StarCaps. Bumetanide is apparently an ingredient in StarCaps, but is not listed on the label. The NFL knew that, but did not tell the players, then ambushed them.

  32. duffsbeer says: Sep 11, 2009 5:53 PM

    Yes, please move the vikings to california. You idiots… the laws in California are even more favourable to the workers then Minnesota. So is Illinois, aka Union Central. I am surprised that the NFL players aren’t on double pay for playing on Sundays when they play the Bears in Chicago.

  33. SpartaChris says: Sep 11, 2009 5:57 PM

    Ralph says:
    September 11, 2009 5:04 PM
    Heck, I think the NFL should be prosecuted as an accomplice to illegal drug trafficking.
    The banned substance in Star Caps is a prescription drug that was put into an over the counter product. That’s illegal, the NFL knew about it and said nothing, that’s pretty much the definition of the law. IF you know someone is breaking the law and you say nothing about it you can be prosecuted as an accessory to the crime.
    =====================================
    That’s not true. A memo was issued to the agents of the players expressly forbidding the use of Star Caps.
    Look it up. It’s in the article Florio wrote about Pat Williams and his trust issues.

  34. JimmySmith says: Sep 11, 2009 6:12 PM

    The Vikings are a disgrace but if this ruling somehow represents a break, they should take it and run.
    Karma is a bitch and she is about to descend on the Viking’s season in ways no one could have anticipated. Its not hard to imagine what could go wrong with an over the hill 40 yr QB, no WR’s and a head coach with an IQ as high as the average temperature in Mpls in November but something more sinister awaits this morally bankrupt franchise.
    So the Fat Williams sisters got by on a technicality, its not as bad as OJ Simpson walking free looking for the real killer but it should come as no surprise to football fans who can recall the origin of the phrases, Love Boat, Whizanator, and coach scalped Superbowl tickets. They will remain low class till the day they move to LA.

  35. DCViking says: Sep 11, 2009 6:21 PM

    Maybe the NFL should hire compentent lawyers to negotiate it’s labor agreements…
    This couldn’t possibly have been that unique a circumstance. I mean, States Rights have been around for what ??? Since the Constitution was written…
    That being said, Josh is accurate — doesn’t mean the Williams are free, just means the trial will take a bit longer before they go to trial.

  36. xproofx says: Sep 11, 2009 6:23 PM

    Confucius say do not expect a lot of refs calls to go your way dear Vikings.

  37. Vikefanman says: Sep 11, 2009 6:41 PM

    The NFL sure didnt hesitate to hide behind “The State of Minnesota” when Cory Stringers wife tried to sue them…… They argued that his death fell under the States Occupational Injury or Work Comp. jurisdiction…..
    The NFL said they couldnt be sued since the player was employed by a Minnesota employer.
    For the love of God…..give ALL of these players a pass on this incident (to stop making lawyers rich) and close the loophole in the next contract.

  38. VonClausewitz says: Sep 11, 2009 6:47 PM

    You know just once I’d like to see the NFL just plain admit that their drug policy doesn’t work that well. That it’s badly worded and full of holes. That they can’t spontaneously create a policy and expect state and federal laws to comply (the gall!). For once I’d expect them to be honest about their failures rather than passing blame. I’d have respect for an honest appraisal. This whiny act on the other hand is completely absent in redeeming qualities.
    Yes the PA is half responsible for this policy. The other responsible party? Why the NFL of course.
    Also the failure of the league to handle this situation correctly may have the potential of derailing a superbowl run by the Vikes. If they manage to get a hearing during the season and subsequently pull the Williams Wall out at a key run of games well then they’d just be messing with the integrity of the game. It’s an ugly situation all around. It has the potential to get a lot uglier. On the positive side they can use this case as a starting point for the CBA discussions which have been going nowhere. Unlike the opening of the books issue I’m sure the PA and the league are a lot closer on this than they are apart. How about building a little compromise first? A little dialog goes a long way in building trust. As it stands it looks like the league is going out of its way to cause a stoppage. Get it together guys, please.

  39. DailyNorseman says: Sep 11, 2009 7:19 PM

    Nice to see that the WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMbulances have already been dispatched to Chicago and Green Bay.
    Bunch of whining f’ing crybabies. . .you were wrong and Vikings fans were right the whole time. Wash the sand out of your collective vagina and admit it.
    The Bears or Packers’ chances of winning the NFC North this year was already between slim and none. The only difference now is that Slim has just asked the waitress for his check.

  40. VoxVeritas says: Sep 11, 2009 7:20 PM

    “A Cowboys fan should be the last person to talk smack about the Vikings or their fans. ”
    And why would that be? The Cowboys don’t have any problems with getting the fans to support them, so it can’t be that. Is it because the Vikings have been so successful? No, they’ve won no Super Bowls, in fact the Cowboys have won four Super Bowls since the last time the Vikings appeared in one. Is it how Jerry Jones figuratively tied the Vikings to a rape stand and had his filthy dirty way with them in the Herschel Walker deal? Tell me, what do the Vikings and their fans have over the Cowboys and their fans that should preclude Cowboys fans from talking about the Vikings and/or their fans? Don’t being up recent playoff wins. Playoff wins aren’t going to keep the Vikings from running away from Minnesota like their hair’s on fire.

  41. VoxVeritas says: Sep 11, 2009 7:24 PM

    Wow… I completely agree with JimmySmith’s comments, but I will add that if they were to give that organization an enema they could save money by moving what’s left to LA overnight in a cigar box shipped via FedEx.

  42. Capt. Jayrocks says: Sep 11, 2009 7:28 PM

    I love the sour grapes from all the vikings haters. The Williams tested positive for starcaps not steriods. Christ we all know why they challenged the NFL on this issue. The y felt they were not guilty of anything so they fought the ruling, and thanks to Minnesota state law they won. Atleast for now. I’m sure that Mr Holier than thou GODdell will continue to pursue the issue. I ‘m glad the NFL lost not because I’m a Vikingd fan, but because they had a part in screwing this whole thing up, and are too coceited to see that. As far as the Vikings moving to LA, man whoever actually thinks that is going to happen is beyond dillusional. LA has never been able to support an NFL team (Rams, Raiders), and never will there fan base does’nt care about football as much as baseball, or basketball, plus the state tax is way to high, to even consider such an idiotic proposition. If the vikes ever move LA wont be the destination. Why don’t you people worry about your own teams future, and don’t worry about the vikes, if you hate us just don’t pay attention to our team, and root for your own. You won’t be missed.

  43. Osterhouse says: Sep 11, 2009 7:30 PM

    “Karma is a bitch”-Jimmy Smith
    ——————————
    Between u, bob nelson, and the rest of the clowns i would say Karma has your constant trash talking/attempts at degrading remarks all added up for the pack to go 0-16.

  44. jas7n says: Sep 11, 2009 7:40 PM

    With regards to federal law in the United States marijuana is an illegal drug. According to California law it is not when used for medicinal purposes. If the White House found out through scientific testing that Hostess cupcakes contained marijuana but chose not to tell the world then tried to fire all city employees for eating those particular sweets at a Christmas party how well would that go over?
    the NFL was wrong, period. I love the league and it’s product but these types of statements are ignorant corporate drivel that should be left so the slugs who dream this sh!t up. It’s a classic divide and conquer strategy and if any team, player or union leader is dumb enough to even respond to this the league’s plan deserves to work.
    What Union could in good faith side with an employer over the employees it represents in ANY situation and still consider itself to be doing a good job? This is just petty, all sorts of tacky and pathetic.
    I’m all for busting cheaters but most of these guys were 300+ pound defensive lineman obviously just trying to make weight. Was this the best or right way to do it? No, but they purchased a product that you, I or anyone else could have. How can we know what’s in something if it’s not on the label? How many people have access to that sort of scientific testing? Hmm, the NFL apparently and they chose not to share the results of that testing with the players who make the league what it is. If every starter in the league had somehow gotten ahold of StarCaps you think the Commissioner would have suspended them all and called on the Union to support such an action? Lmao
    The NFL SERIOUSLY needs to pull the stick out because they’re picking increasingly dumba$$, petty fights that are heading towards costing us all an NFL season.

  45. 34_Fan_4_Life says: Sep 11, 2009 7:42 PM

    The league can still impose the suspensions IF they want to.
    All they have to do is suspend the Minnesota players for their first 4 AWAY GAMES.
    It ain’t rocket surgery.

  46. minnesotarage says: Sep 11, 2009 8:05 PM

    Mike, why is JimmySmith still on this site? I can’t remember the last post about the Vikings that he hasn’t spewed hatred and foul language about the Vikings. It’s getting old. Really old.

  47. Elgar says: Sep 11, 2009 9:08 PM

    The Constitution of the United States of America is not a “technicality,” it is the supreme law of the nation. Its Tenth Amendment guarantees the states the power to pass certain laws, including those passed by the duly elected government of the people of the state of Minnesota.
    Minnesota law merely protects employees from punishment for taking legal products on their own time.
    In their case, the league tried to argue that the players had no time of their own because they were at training camp. Apparently, they may not really have a strong grasp on the Thirteenth Amendment either. In this county, we do not own human beings. If you are going to take things to court and don’t understand the law, then God help you.
    If the NFL were as deeply concerned about health as its moaning press releases state, it would have made public its knowledge that a banned substance was being illegally sold in an over-the counter product.
    The NFL retains lawyers, and they signed the CBA. Haven’t they even learned that any agreement to violate the law is not a valid legal contract? First year law students know this.
    The NFL is not a government. It’s not even a corporation. Nowhere in the Constitution did the country’s founders grant Roger Goodell any special powers. Governments pass laws, not sports leagues.
    Stop pointing your finger at everyone else. If it is really the NFL steroids policy and it is not written in a legal manner, fix it. Over half the states do not even have NFL teams, so the laws of twenty-eight states do not even apply. It’s not that difficult. Get to work.
    Or go sit in the corner and pout.
    We’ll be watching.

  48. Bigskyvikes says: Sep 11, 2009 9:18 PM

    Burritto says:
    September 11, 2009 4:32 PM
    The moral of the story is that unions are obsolete clusters of evildoers who are leading simps.
    What do you do for a living?
    Whatever it is thank a Union for what you get paid, because if it was’nt for Unions we would all be making $10 an hour, no matter what you did!
    Amazing how this is read by you and this is your response, moron………

  49. Carl Gerbschmidt says: Sep 11, 2009 10:07 PM

    So the same clowns that voted for frankin are complaining about a curse on their franchise, that’s funny. LA vikings win the SB in 2012. Good luck with the mississippi queen

  50. Skeety says: Sep 11, 2009 11:24 PM

    funny how many quoted me here, i’ve been following the case closely, not just on PFT. Many said I was wrong, but no, you can hop over to the NFL official site and read the story. The vikings players sued in state court and fought back. Saints? no, they let the NFPA handle it.

  51. jrhsd says: Sep 11, 2009 11:28 PM

    I can’t figure out if the Packer fans or Roger GOD-del are crying louder.
    It’s all music to my ears.

  52. Carl Gerbschmidt says: Sep 11, 2009 11:42 PM

    The vikings will fold like a circus tent, they have done it since 1961

  53. purpleguy says: Sep 12, 2009 12:10 AM

    Same lame comments by the same dumbass usual suspects, only now we have the vaunted Vox chiming in too.
    If anyone had bothered to read the opinions in this case, or heck, even Mike’s summary posts, they wouldn’t be either suprised by the result, blaming the players, or spouting a bunch of irrelevant and ignorant gibberish. Under the very frigging federal law the NFL seeks to enforce, a collective bargaining agreement doesn’t pre-empt state law unless is specifically states as much in the agreement. Here, the high priced NFL attorneys didn’t include such language. Who’s fault is that?
    Further, the NFL, in it’s hype machine, which has been bought lock, stock and barrel by half the dopes posting here, implies that MN players are somehow exempt from the bargining agreement. They’re not. The Minnesota court still has to rule if the state laws over-ride the bargaining agreement dsciplinary terms, and only those terms will be deemed pre-empted (they will win on those points by the way, and the NFL knows it). These laws were actually put in place by unions and businesses to protect employee rights — ironically now the NFL whines that it should be above this law when it had the power to ensure that was the case.
    Actually, this decision likely means any applicable state employment law would pre-empt the collective bargaining agreement, whether it’s Vox’s beloved Cowboys or Jimmy Smith’s pre-season darling Packer team. The Williams boys have opened the door for the same argument in every State with an NFL team which has applicable employment laws — arguments the fans/posters from each team would support if it was their players involved. Of course, it might be asking a lot of Packer or Cowboy fans to actually read the law, or apparently read for that matter.

  54. purpleguy says: Sep 12, 2009 12:12 AM

    Carl, you mean fold like the cheesers on their 6-10 run last year?

  55. Stillwaters75 says: Sep 12, 2009 2:07 AM

    Wow! It seem like a lot of you guys never read the original story about this. The NFL had a chance to do the right thing but they didn’t. The real reason this is such a problem is not because the ingredient wasn’t listed. It was the lack of responsibility by the league.
    Sure there’s part of the bargaining agreement that states that its the players job to know what they’re putting into their bodies but they left out something. In the case of the New Orleans players, they actually sent out a bottle to the NFL doping lab for testing. The league then ok’d them to take it. Only to come back later and suspend them. For some reason they leave that part out of every story written on this.
    So now look at it. Not only did the league already know about the banned drug but they failed warn and gave the O.K. for it. So instead of admitting the slip up,
    they tried to suspend these guys and blame the players. Of course they have a reason for this , that once again no one is reporting. They suspended players last year for the same thing while knowing about the banned substance. So if they admitted guilt they then would be responsible for those players lost wages. Funny huh?

  56. JimmySmith says: Sep 12, 2009 8:13 AM

    @minnesotarage
    Here’s my advice, stop reading the posts. Ignore them, move on. What you deem as hatred and foul language might be considered in other quarters as opinion and observation.
    What we can agree on is what is getting real old. That would be the Biqueen fans talking Superbowl. Ya, I want Meghan Fox to come over and sit on my face and ironically, I have a better chance of that happening than the Vikings going to the Superbowl.
    The Viking fans have earned the reputation of talking silly, insipid, nonsensical smack talk. You would think after going 0-4 in Superbowls (over 30 years ago) and 0-2 in NFC championship games in the last 15 years, the Viking fans would temper their predictions and boasting but it has only gotten worse. I am merely trying to soften their expectations prior to the inevitable crash and burn trainwreck as a favor to the fan base.
    No thanks are necessary, I consider it the least I could do.

  57. jimicos says: Sep 12, 2009 9:33 AM

    Albatross says:
    September 11, 2009 5:44 PM
    They took StarCaps. Bumetanide is apparently an ingredient in StarCaps, but is not listed on the label. The NFL knew that, but did not tell the players, then ambushed them.
    ——————————
    And they were acting completely within the rules in doing so. The NFL is NOT REQUIRED to research every goddamn drug or supplement on the market and report their findings to the players. In reporting their findings on StarCaps, they would inadvertantly create a situation where the players and the union would EXPECT the NFL to research every product and report on all of them. You think the union wouldn’t try that approach?

  58. Albatross says: Sep 12, 2009 1:24 PM

    No the NFL isn’t required to research every drug or supplement. But they DID research this one, back in 2006, did not discipline the players who were found to have used it at that time (for all we know they may have been some of the same guys who were disciplined in 2008) and did not add it to the list of banned substances. Then they ambushed them.

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