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Fein's death believed to be suicide

Early Wednesday morning, Mike Florio mentioned the sad and sudden passing of former Ravens player Tony Fein, an Iraq veteran that tried to make the Ravens in training camp as a 27-year-old.

Former PFT staffer Aaron Wilson reports that an autopsy will be performed, and toxicology tests will be taken as there are concerns that something Fein ingested may have contributed to his death.

Results will not be known for 6-8 weeks.

Fein’s Baltimore attorney Warren A. Brown told Wilson that it’s believed Fein committed suicide.

“It’s very sad,” Brown said.

If Brown is right, the tragedy could spark further discussion on the best ways to help our young veterans. The U.S. Army reported earlier this year the highest rate of suicides among its soldiers since it began tracking the statistic 28 years ago. 

We send our condolensces to Fein’s friends and family during this difficult time.

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50 Responses to “Fein's death believed to be suicide”
  1. hayward giablommi says: Oct 7, 2009 4:41 PM

    Horrible story. Just think of how many other vets who we’ve never heard of are going through the same thing.
    We could start make things right by prosecuting the war criminals who got us into this mess, whom have destroyed countless lives and families in the name of greed – cloaked in patriotism and chasing down boogiemen.
    It used to be so much easier to be proud to be American.

  2. Resolution says: Oct 7, 2009 4:43 PM

    Thats very sad. I’m sure they’ll never read this, but I wish his family the best.

  3. ppdoc13 says: Oct 7, 2009 4:51 PM

    G-d bless you Tony. I hope you find your peace in the world to come. As a 1st Gulf war vet and having seen many of my friends troubled by the war, my prayers and best wishes go out to your family and to you to find the peace that all of the men and women who lay their life on the line to protect our country so well deserve.

  4. ppdoc13 says: Oct 7, 2009 4:54 PM

    @hayward Giablommi – as a vet, I find your comment insulting. We should just as well prosecute this administration for botching what is happening in Afganistan right now. Since you find it hard to be proud to be an American, you’re welcome to immigrate to Venezuela, Iran, Russia or any of the other places in this world that must be doing something right that we just can’t do here for you.

  5. bearsrule says: Oct 7, 2009 4:58 PM

    This is an epidemic among troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

  6. Tr3pidation says: Oct 7, 2009 4:59 PM

    Sad news. He was in the Seahawk’s training camp, so he was a guy I was hoping would make the roster.
    My condolences to his family and friends.

  7. east96street says: Oct 7, 2009 5:01 PM

    Tragic. Hopefully the media will use his death to highlight how many of our brave men and women have now spent more time in combat than our WWII soldiers did and how little psychological help is available for our vets. People need to stop putting ribbon magnets on their cars and start writing checks to organizations that help our soldiers since the VA no longer has the capacity or the funding to do so.
    http://iava.org/
    http://www.dav.org/

  8. RIP__21 says: Oct 7, 2009 5:05 PM

    Always tragic when parents live to see their children pass, especially in this manner. Condolences to his family.

  9. Seeryer says: Oct 7, 2009 5:08 PM

    Thank you for your service Mr Fein. While not all agree on the missions our government sends our finest on, we do all agree that it takes a special courage and commitment by our troops. You will be remebered for your sacrifices for this country and not how your life ended. Regardless, no one can take away the courage you showed going over there. Thank you for stepping up for your fellow Americans.

  10. Grulks says: Oct 7, 2009 5:11 PM

    Haward,
    we could start by making things right by executing you. Don’t use this soldier’s death to further your liberalist views. Regardless of whether “this mess” is something you agree or disagree with, it is not something that belongs in a post about the tragic death of veteran. I understand the connection you are trying to make, but attempting to link and advance your views (and that’s all they are, is views, not absolute truth) to this situation is classless, ugly and unpatriotic.
    Please don’t sully our veteran’s memories by trying to further your own agenda.
    -Someone who proudly serves this country, and follows orders, irrespective of the political agenda.

  11. leatherneck says: Oct 7, 2009 5:14 PM

    Our country spends a lot of money on goofy stuff.
    Could we please, please, spend more on mental health for veterans?

  12. troll_aikman8 says: Oct 7, 2009 5:31 PM

    That’s horrible news and my heart goes out to him, his family and friends.
    Thanks Bush, Rumsfeld, Cheney, Wolfowitz, Rice, et all. Hell of a job. Worst administration ever.

  13. tombrookshire says: Oct 7, 2009 5:35 PM

    ppdoc13 – please be tolerant of others’ points of view. This has nothing to do with dems or reps. It has to do with those out there who would continue these wars without end in order to make themselves much more rich, on the backs of patriots who think they are fighting for their country. Before the U.S. went into Afghanistan, the amount of opium that country produced was almost at 0. Today, it supplies 80% of the world’s opium supply, the bulk of which goes right here to the good ole US of A. It is those profits, from laundering drug money, and much more that guys like these are losing their lives, not only at the hand of the Taliban, but at their own. Very sad state of affairs in this country. Now, back to football.

  14. Dewey ActSwooned says: Oct 7, 2009 5:53 PM

    @hayward,
    You and I often see eye-to-eye, Vick and Bratt bashing, etc.
    But in this case you’re way off base:
    Why must people (I’ll refrain from saying “liberals”) politicize EVERYTHING, even something as noble and poignant as the death of a serviceman, which should by all rights be ABOVE the petty political ideologies and cheap digs of both the right and left?
    But since you’ve opened this can of worms…
    You do realize that Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, John Kerry, John Edwards, Robert Byrd, Henry Waxman, Tom Daschle, and Nancy Pelosi–among a Kennedy-hangover-sized list of many others–all either believed WMDs were present or voted for/supported the war when it began…
    Ex: Hillary Clinton on Oct 8, 2002:
    “In the four years since the inspectors left, intelligence reports show that Saddam Hussein has worked to rebuild his chemical and biological weapons stock, his missile delivery capability, and his nuclear program. He has also given aid, comfort, and sanctuary to terrorists, including Al Qaeda members, though there is apparently no evidence of his involvement in the terrible events of September 11, 2001. It is clear, however, that if left unchecked, Saddam Hussein will continue to increase his capacity to wage biological and chemical warfare, and will keep trying to develop nuclear weapons. Should he succeed in that endeavor, he could alter the political and security landscape of the Middle East, which as we know all too well affects American security.”
    But back to Faien–the manner in which this young man died doesn’t make his death any less noble, or any less of a sacrifice which should be honored and remembered, as well as appreciated.
    And despite increased publicity and funding/resources, there’s still a HUGE lack of compassion/understanding (and available help) when it comes to PTSD and our veterans, stigmas and obstacles are STILL involved, which leads to tragedies like this one.
    http://www.veteranprograms.com/index.html

  15. JoeSchmoe says: Oct 7, 2009 5:55 PM

    @Grulks
    You fought/fight to protect peoples right to have their own opinions, yet you want to execute someone you don’t agree with? That’s sad.
    War destroys families, and the psyche’s of the soldiers involved. It needs to end now.
    I am all about having a military to protect us and our great homeland, but we’re not doing that in the Middle East in my opinion. Bring them home and strengthen our borders and build great things here in America again.
    RIP to Fein and all the deceased fighting for our rights to observe the various freedoms we enjoy here.

  16. dldavidlong says: Oct 7, 2009 6:01 PM

    where does it say he killed himself because of the war?

  17. buckifan4life says: Oct 7, 2009 6:05 PM

    Hayward = liberalist douchebag!
    Carry a weapon for your country then you can run your mouth. This thread is not the appropriate time to do so regardless…
    My condolences to Fein’s family.

  18. Shake says: Oct 7, 2009 6:09 PM

    I was moved to sign up and post for the first time today after reading the comments to this article in order to say a few things.
    Have respect for this man who had more courage and love in his heart than most of us, including myself.
    He set out to serve his country and I hope he did so with pride.
    Do not turn this thread into a political show down or an ideological battle of any kind.
    Let us all thank him for his sacrifices and acknowledge that we often do so far too late.
    Remember we still have many men and women who have and still serve, use this time to think of them and how we can give back to them in a positive way.

  19. Bigbluefan says: Oct 7, 2009 6:14 PM

    First and most important thank you for your service and RIP
    As to you aholes who are turning this into a debate about the war stfu
    We owe this young man and all the other men and women a hug and a huge thank you for keeping us safe at home so we can sit and do stupid things like post to this blog
    God Bless our Fighting men and women you are fantastic
    If your not proud to be an american get the hell out of my country go else where and see how great it is. YES this is my country and I will defend it and its honor

  20. Vox's Mommy says: Oct 7, 2009 6:19 PM

    JoeSchmoe and Shake. Thanks for your RELEVANT posts in the midst of the crap these other jerks calls “posts”. If it wasn’t for your guys posts I would have left this thread feeling pretty damn depressed.
    This is PFT – PRO FOOTBALL TALK
    not…
    PFT – POLITICS FOR TURDS
    Leave it out of here.

  21. tacious says: Oct 7, 2009 6:20 PM

    @dldavidlong
    EXACTLY…
    This is not a political blog people… regardless if you’re on the Left or the Right of the political spectrum, please take your political views over to Drudgereport or CNN.com and leave this site for football…hayward Giablommi!
    No one here really cares if you think this is Bush’s fault… just as no one here really cares if you think Obama is just as terrible a President as Bush was.
    RIP Tony Fein

  22. slipkid says: Oct 7, 2009 6:24 PM

    i work with the army every day. there are a lot of redeployments. as usual, the civilians get to take all the suicide prevention training…
    sometimes the lack of support is right in the home. his didnt seem to be a case where the stateside squeeze/gf/wife said get lost… but we had a case like that at work a few months ago. it happens.
    for the last few years the VA has drawn a lot of criticism. things havent gotten better under an electee who said he would end all this. in fact, the unamerican elite wanted obama because he promised them he would keep it going… no matter what he promised his antiwar base.
    this is certainly a rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight. expect the ruling class, the uni-party, to use the military as a jobs program.
    yet another war not for freedom, but for apparent prosperity. before you enlist, read what usmc general smedley butler had to say.
    i would worry more about domestic enemies. and secure our borders. and end the fed.

  23. tacious says: Oct 7, 2009 6:27 PM

    @ tombrookshire
    I’m really not sure where you are getting your data from, but if you knew anything, you would know that historically, Afghanistan is the would’s No.1 Opium supplier… that has been a constant for decades!
    Do a little research before you post; and by research, I mean not just gathering data and talking points from moveon.org

  24. Tdk24 says: Oct 7, 2009 6:28 PM

    buckifan4life=someone who enjoyed 8 years of dictatorship.
    I first heard of this epidemic about 2 years ago. I am finally starting to hear ads on the radio for these troubled vets to seek help and for others to seek help for them. I don’t remember the percentage of vet suicides, but it made my head spin it was so high. It’s nice to have some compassion in the white house instead of being told to ‘man up” and accept it.

  25. PayDoh says: Oct 7, 2009 6:33 PM

    Lock the borders down, boot the illegals.

  26. tombrookshire says: Oct 7, 2009 6:54 PM

    ppdoc13 – please be tolerant of others’ points of view. This has nothing to do with dems or reps. It has to do with those out there who would continue these wars without end in order to make themselves much more rich, on the backs of patriots who think they are fighting for their country. Before the U.S. went into Afghanistan, the amount of opium that country produced was almost at 0. Today, it supplies 80% of the world’s opium supply, the bulk of which goes right here to the good ole US of A. It is those profits, from laundering drug money, and much more that guys like these are losing their lives, not only at the hand of the Taliban, but at their own. Very sad state of affairs in this country. Now, back to football.

  27. realityonetwo says: Oct 7, 2009 7:26 PM

    Yeah, Hayward, thanks for corroborating what we thought about you all along.

  28. falconfan10 says: Oct 7, 2009 7:32 PM

    Hayward,
    I will buy you a one way plane ticket to hang out with Hugo Chavez if you promise to never come back.
    Sincerely,
    Proud American

  29. Kidekk says: Oct 7, 2009 7:39 PM

    So, it went from talking about the passing of a man, to insulting people for their beliefs? I’ll keep on saying it, the media, and everyone else treats these soldiers like they’re expendable. Every time one of them dies, their death is used to push some agenda. These guys chose to serve their country, they know what can happen to them when they’re over there, and they also go in knowing that what happens when they go over there will change their life forever. Appreciate the man and his life, instead of cheapening it to drive your own views.
    A lot of people in this world need help that they can’t and don’t get.

  30. ppdoc13 says: Oct 7, 2009 8:08 PM

    tombrookshire – i am very tolerant of other peoples views. i never mentioned political affiliation, you did. i served my country under both a democrat and republican administration. my commander in chief was that, irrespective of party affiliation. i am politically independent and have voted for both parties my whole life. how DARE you imply that those who serve “think they are fighting for their country.” are you a vet? do you know a lot of vets? do you know what motivates most of the people who serve whether in the military or police, or fire departments in the country. did you ever do anything for your country or are you one of the many who take, and take, and take and never think about giving back. i served our my country and was willing to give my life for your right to have your own views. don’t disparage mine or intimate that I am some blind moron who “thinks he is fighting for his country” when he is really serving the interests of the big bad republican Haliburtons of the world. JFK (and this administration is no JFK) said “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” Would that our politicians today really understood the meaning of that quote.

  31. DoomsDayD75 says: Oct 7, 2009 8:13 PM

    Wars seem to have horrible effects on people and we should try to avoid them. Too bad so many people make so much money off of them.
    One more grave to add to the endless number at Arlington Cemetery. Rest in peace.

  32. east96street says: Oct 7, 2009 8:54 PM

    Kidekk says: “A lot of people in this world need help that they can’t and don’t get.”
    True. But we, as a nation, promised these men and women better. We pay them crap, we feed them crap, we take them away from the families for years at a time, and we ask them to sacrifice their lives while the people at home scream bloody murder if someone suggests raising taxes to provide them with adequate benefits or to, at very least, pay for the wars. Clinton forced thousands of soldiers out prior to reaching their full pension. The Bush tax cuts included some of the largest cuts in veteran benefits in US history. Both parties routinely screw these people over. We demand that they give and give and give and, yet, we give them nothing back. A tiny fraction of the population ever serves, even fewer volunteer to help vets out, and even less give to charities that directly support our vets and the men and women still in uniform. If we keep abusing and ignoring them and we keep breaking our promises to them – who, in their right mind, will serve? A lot of what is wrong with this country could be resolved if we required mandatory military service – with politician kids serving in combat zones. You would see remarkable changes overnight.

  33. SmackMyVickUp says: Oct 7, 2009 9:18 PM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q65KZIqay4E
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq0t7ZUwzGA
    Political yahoos who posted above should take a minute and watch these.

  34. hayward giablommi says: Oct 7, 2009 9:51 PM

    ppdoc13
    Grulks
    I appreciate what you have done for our country. My apologies if you were offended by my comments.
    I don’t expect you to agree with me, but so be it…that is a great thing about America. My brother is being deployed next week for his first tour in Iraq and my best friend has served two tours there already. Thus, I feel strongly about the issue. It appalls me to see our best and brightest going off to fight unwinnable wars, and to see how we underarm them and then don’t give them the services they need upon their return home… To me, that is our national shame…moreso than how or why we got into these wars.

  35. hayward giablommi says: Oct 7, 2009 10:08 PM

    @ Dewey ActSwooned
    I am going to follow my own instincts and refrain from making political points on a football blog in the future, especially since this involves a young man’s unfortunate, untimely, but possibly preventable death. You are correct in that an overwhelming amount of returning vets suffer from PTSD, and so much more can be done and must be done if we are going to continue to send kids into hell on earth.
    To your other point…I see through all the Democrat-Republican finger pointing. Truth is, all these politicians have no credibility or integrity. Lobbyists call the shots. This is not what our founding fathers had in mind.

  36. hayward giablommi says: Oct 7, 2009 10:10 PM

    realityonetwo says:
    Yeah, Hayward, thanks for corroborating what we thought about you all along.
    ^^^^^^^^
    I haven’t agreed with anything I’ve seen you post here to date, so I guess there’s no point in starting now.

  37. Kidekk says: Oct 7, 2009 10:11 PM

    @Hayward, you don’t need to apologize for anything. I would tell you why, but this isn’t the forum for it.

  38. hayward giablommi says: Oct 7, 2009 10:20 PM

    you don’t need to apologize for anything. I would tell you why, but this isn’t the forum for it.
    ^^^^^^
    Go for it.

  39. ppdoc13 says: Oct 7, 2009 10:31 PM

    @Hayward – apology accepted. thank you. and btw – agreed with your last set of comments especially about the problems with care of the vet once they get home.

  40. Richm2256 says: Oct 7, 2009 11:04 PM

    This has turned into political BS.
    This guy served his country, and for that we should all be thankful, whether we agree with the mission he was sent to or not. Did we learn NOTHING from Viet Nam?
    This young man survived the war, as countless veterans do, and had a hard time adjusting to life after the military, it sounds like.
    He apparently had a dream to make it in the NFL, and that dream, close as he got, didn’t come true. It must have been a crushing heartbreak to him. The sad part is he may not have reached out for help in dealing with this disappointment and may have made a fateful despondant decision.
    We can debate whether that is the Army’s fault for failing him post-service, the US government’s fault for starting the war that he got sent to fight, the NFL’s fault for being so damned unattainable to all but the elite athletes (are any of you NFL diva’s looking at how hard this guy wanted what you take for granted?) …. you could find fault with his freiends or family for not seeing whatever signs he may have given.
    Simply put, a despondant person made the ultimate decision. That goes on every day in every state in the country, and it’s all about H-E-L-P for people who feel hopeless. THAT is the issue, you idiots, not which administration did what to whom.

  41. Shackman v2.0 says: Oct 7, 2009 11:54 PM

    ppdoc13, thank you so very much for your service to our country and bless you and your family. As a Vietnam veteran myself, it is much appreciated.
    east96th st, thank you very much for your links to the VA. As someone with a lot of time on my hands these days, I’m going to contact the VA hospital here in Milwaukee to gather information on becoming a volunteer in whatever capacity I can.
    Either by providing transportation for veterans to the hospital here for treatment, or just simply visiting and providing a little companionship to some of our wounded vets. Although I’m not a wealthy man by any means, I now feel an obligation and an opportunity to give back a little something back to a country that has given me so very, very much.

  42. Kidekk says: Oct 8, 2009 12:08 AM

    @Hayward,
    Fine. I’ll be a hypocrite. Isn’t that what the interenet’s for?
    The last two paragraphs of Richm’s post pretty much sum up my feelings, but what I don’t get is the blanket assertion that everyone in the army is doing it for the noble cause of serving their country. Some do it for that reason, some do it because they’re poor and it’ll give them a home and food, some do it because it’s the only way they’ll be able to pay for school, some do it because they have a desire to kill some people, and some do it to fast track citizenship (had a friend who received his green card two weeks after joining, probably wasn’t two weeks, but it was in some very short period of time). Everyone has different reasons for joining, so when military personnel and others tell people to get out of the country because people say something that doesn’t mesh with their way of thinking and they mistakenly perceive it as a slight, it’s stupid.
    Almost as stupid as those people who claim that people who disagree with the war are automatically Democrats/Liberals, or people who don’t like Bush automatically are Democrats or support Obama. The “your either with us or against us” vibe on this site is ridiculous (then again, maybe I’m dumb to expect intelligent discussion of any topic on a football site). The same people that will cry out against being PC are probably the same people calling you out right now.
    What a vet did over there isn’t diminished by the fact that they may have been doing it under false pretenses, or for a different cause (I’m not asserting anything). Hayward calling out the President doesn’t mean that what you did over there was any less nobel, or cheapen what you did. If you went out there believing that what you were doing was serving your country and followed the orders from the top, then why would you be mad over what he said?
    And this is America, the same country that had slavery, put Japanese people in internment camps, ignored the Halocaust and turned away Jews, dropped two atomic bombs and scoffed at collateral damage, exploited Latin America, and put into power some of those people that it now rails against (and has in the past). Do you want those people who see that as wrong shipped out of here, too? People have their opinions, America has its faults, and not every American is going to blindly stand for everything that has happened in order to conform to what you perceive to be Patriotism. If anything, this country has been built on learning from its mistakes, and the mistakes of others. With the good comes the bad, so it’s perplexing when people shout the “get out of my country” rhetoric when someone says something that they don’t agree with.
    I mean, look at what ppdoc said. Everything is all right now because he agreed with what you said. I thought Cuba was the country where you were persecuted for going against the grain and pressured into aligning (or at least showing that you align) with popular thought. Oh, but I forgot, this is America.

  43. Kidekk says: Oct 8, 2009 12:11 AM

    And I respect the hell out of anyone who has served.

  44. ppdoc13 says: Oct 8, 2009 9:12 AM

    @kidkk – stop being dense. everything is not alright because I agreed with what he said. i accepted his apology for what I felt was insulting to people who have served our country as I have.
    Is America perfect? No. But I would rather live here with its imperfections than in places like Cuba, Russia, Venezuela, Iran etc where forums like this where we typically discuss football and have strayed into politics would not even be allowed.
    You want to talk about pressure to align? How about the PC issues in our country that say if you critisize this president the liberal elite brand you as a racist?

  45. Kidekk says: Oct 8, 2009 9:34 AM

    “You want to talk about pressure to align? How about the PC issues in our country that say if you critisize this president the liberal elite brand you as a racist?”
    I think I covered that in the part where I say: “The “your either with us or against us” vibe on this site is ridiculous.”
    And if you would rather live here where discussion of politics is allowed, why would you tells someone: “Since you find it hard to be proud to be an American, you’re welcome to immigrate to Venezuela, Iran, Russia or any of the other places in this world that must be doing something right that we just can’t do here for you.” You’re basically telling someone that he is not entitled to the rights that you supposedly fought for us to have. People can be proud to be an American and still criticize it. What you did is like calling him un-American because he voted for McCain instead of the now President Obama.

  46. ppdoc13 says: Oct 8, 2009 12:29 PM

    My point is that there are an extroindary number of people who jump to critisize the country that has given them the quality of life that they could not get elsewhere. Many, many of these people have done nothing in their life to serve their country. Why do I say that? It has been rare for me to hear these kind of comments from people who have given of their lives to protect and defend their country. I’ll stand by what I said. I will defend to the death your right to be wrong (by my estimation), but don’t denigrate my service or imply that people who serve are pawns for big business. And if the country is such a hole, you can exercise your free will be voting in whomever you please or even leaving and trying to find someplace better.

  47. Kidekk says: Oct 8, 2009 1:36 PM

    Are you reading what I’m writing? What have I said that has been wrong? Here is what I said:
    “So, it went from talking about the passing of a man, to insulting people for their beliefs? I’ll keep on saying it, the media, and everyone else treats these soldiers like they’re expendable. Every time one of them dies, their death is used to push some agenda. These guys chose to serve their country, they know what can happen to them when they’re over there, and they also go in knowing that what happens when they go over there will change their life forever. Appreciate the man and his life, instead of cheapening it to drive your own views.
    A lot of people in this world need help that they can’t and don’t get.”
    Where did I say that soldiers are pawns for big business? What I said is that people use the deaths of soldiers to push their own agendas instead of just appreciating the service that they have done for their country. And did I say the country is a hole or just pointed out things that it has done? Are you reading anything that I am writing or just sticking to your guns and not trying to understand a word I wrote because it clashes with what you expect Americans to do, shut up and just mozy on by, when this country was built on revolt? Nothing I have said is un-American (and I’m not even American), I’m not calling for communism, and I have said nothing that implies that America is not the best place in the world to live. You’re making stuff up. I didn’t denigrate your service in anyway, but if you feel like I did, once again, reread what I wrote and comprehend it.
    Yes, people criticize the country, that’s their right. And is everyone really getting a better quality of life than they could get in other countries? You’re telling me that they should be happy enough to just be citizens and not push for what they believe in? Are you that dense? Are you living in America? Just because you have served your country does not make you the end all be all of knowledge concerning people’s rights and what they believe. Sure, you know more about war than most individuals, but that does not make you an expert on what it means to be American, or even be able to make a claim that none of these people have served their country just because they’re not in the military (if that’s what you’re implying).

  48. SmackMyVickUp says: Oct 8, 2009 2:32 PM

    “A humble young man,” Baltimore linebacker Ray Lewis said. “Our hearts definitely go out to his family because it’s such a tragedy for a man to be that young and go through the things he’s been through.”
    Update to the story.
    http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ap-obit-fein&prov=ap&type=lgns
    Fein’s agent, Milton D. Hobbs, a lawyer in Oxford, Miss., said he knew of no medical condition or previous severe illness in Fein.
    “As I understand it, it was an accidental situation,” Hobbs said. “As far as I understand it from family members, there’s nothing to indicate that he intended to hurt himself.”

  49. rarson says: Oct 8, 2009 5:18 PM

    The government gets it’s authority from the ideological belief in the legitimacy of it’s monopoly on violence. It’s supported by taxation (ie, extortion) which, oddly enough, many people seem to feel it’s their duty to pay.
    I pay taxes because I’m scared of the gun pointed in my face. But at least I don’t buy into this ridiculous notion that it’s okay for a group of people to arbitrarily claim authority over everyone else. I don’t believe that violence is the solution to the world’s problems, and that’s the solution that government projects.
    Military service makes you a tool of the state. I know, because I was a tool of the state. If you insist on seeing it as something more than that, you are brainwashed by the bullshit ideology that keeps this toxic state alive.

  50. MtR says: Oct 8, 2009 6:30 PM

    What is most worrying is that Tony Fein is not, and most unfortunately, will not be alone. We know how war near-permanently affects the psyche, and like the statistic said, it’s getting worse.
    No matter what your views on war are (for example, I am whole-heartedly against war), we need a solution, not a lot of bitching and blaming the opposing factions.
    So, Dems/Reps/Indep/Greens/Whoever else:
    What do we do to keep young men from killing themselves?
    RIP Tony Fein, and my deepest condolences to your friends and family.

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