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McNabb talks Philly, Tebow

We mentioned on Wednesday comments made by Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb to ESPN’s Chris Mortensen regarding McNabb’s desire to stay in Philly.

Our friends at NBC Sports have forwarded to us video of McNabb’s remarks.

He talks both about his future with the Eagles, and he touches on Tim Tebow.

 
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40 Responses to “McNabb talks Philly, Tebow”
  1. BoneCrusher says: Jan 28, 2010 8:40 AM

    Giants fan here…..I’d like to just say Donovan is a class act. If he didn’t beat us all the time I would love the guy.

  2. Hank_SJ says: Jan 28, 2010 8:43 AM

    “Don’t watch TV, don’t listen to the radio.” Coming from someone who is thin-skinned with rabbit-ears this carries a lot of weight. And if TT doesn’t watch TV, then how is he going to get such pearls of wisdom in the future?

  3. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 8:46 AM

    McNabb, just like whoever else is giving Tebow advice, is wrong. Tebow should not be at the Senior Bowl “working on his fundamentals” at QB, he should be running routes, catching passes and running people over. Tebow’s NFL future is at reciever, H-back, or TE. He is wasting his time trying to be an NFL QB.
    He is also recieving terrible advice off the field. Darren Rovel, CNBC’s sports business reporter, claims that Tebow is the “most marketable guy we’ve ever seen coming out of college”. He will blow that out of the water in 30 seconds if that Focus on the Family ad runs during the SB. No matter what your position is on the matter, major advertisers don’t like spokesmen who are divisive. Why do you think Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods never take a position on anything? That spot will cost him millions in future endorsements.
    And you can say what you want about him not caring about that, and choosing to take a stand. A man’s number one responsibility in this world is to take care of his and his families future. He has the oppotunity to secure the future of his children, his children’s children and so on, for generations to come. That should take priority in his life over helping some right wing fringe group get a little publicity.

  4. CtownBleedsGreen says: Jan 28, 2010 8:55 AM

    Simple fact:
    Tebow is a pawn. People rip on the guy for his high level of morals but they also recognize that there is this, I don’t know, innocence about the dude. He’s been roped into this deal and is about to deep six himself. I totally agree with REALITYPOLICE above, he’s getting terrible advice.

  5. cobrala2 says: Jan 28, 2010 8:55 AM

    “A man’s number one responsibility in this world is to take care of his and his families future. He has the oppotunity to secure the future of his children, his children’s children and so on, for generations to come. That should take priority in his life over helping some right wing fringe group get a little publicity.”
    While that IS a tremendous responsibility, it’s a bit dramatic to insinuate Tebow won’t be taking care of the children’s children he doesn’t have. Beyond that name me THREE NFL players who have his grandchildren’s futures secured. As if. Come on, dude, you sound smarter than that.

  6. birdmancometh says: Jan 28, 2010 9:04 AM

    Oh man, look at all of these out of work NFL GM’s hanging out on PFT. Someone give them a chance!

  7. BMack says: Jan 28, 2010 9:14 AM

    As an Eagles fan, I hope that when Donovan’s contract is up, he signs somewhere with a good running game/o-line/defense. That way he can get the Super Bowl he deserves after bringing the Eagles so much success for the past decade. I don’t think he’ll get a SB with Andy Reid/Marty Mornhinweg calling the plays. We never establish a run game/so play-action is useless and every defense knows that we’re going to pass on 7 out of 10 plays so they get to tee-off on our mediocre o-line and then there’s 3 defenders in Donovan’s face all the time. No QB can thrive in that situation. IMHO, anyway.

  8. Bwa Ha Ha says: Jan 28, 2010 9:19 AM

    Tebow has nothing to worry about, God will tell him what to do.

  9. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 9:19 AM

    cobrala2 says:
    January 28, 2010 8:55 AM
    While that IS a tremendous responsibility, it’s a bit dramatic to insinuate Tebow won’t be taking care of the children’s children he doesn’t have. Beyond that name me THREE NFL players who have his grandchildren’s futures secured. As if. Come on, dude, you sound smarter than that.
    ——————————–
    I get your point- most people do have a hard time thinking very far down the road, and certainly that applies to almost all NFL players. However, I think we can safely assume that Tebow plans on having children in the future, probably lots of them. And since they will be raised as he was, I don’t think it is too dramatic to envision a rather large family tree growing in the Tebow forest. And certainly they will have their own means of support. Still, I don’t think it’s overly dramatic to say that given the fact that Tebow, like most pro athletes, will earn a great majority of the money he will earn in his entire life in the next 10-12 years, that he should maximize that potential and stay away from making missteps that could cost him millions, like being a puppet for FOTF.

  10. pbuck says: Jan 28, 2010 9:21 AM

    Whether you agree with something or not, what you are all saying is it is more important to make $ first than to stand up for what you believe in?

  11. Hap says: Jan 28, 2010 9:22 AM

    Dnvn McScb “We’ve had a lot of success over the yrs.”…. except for the fact that we were swept (3 times) by The Cowboys this year.

  12. WarrenMoonGOAT says: Jan 28, 2010 9:24 AM

    so above poster mentioned Jordan & Tiger Woods two men who have questionable morals when it comes to their family and don’t take a stand on anything…well both men are just athletes great athletes and not great men. learning and growing into a man means u take a stand for what you believe in, not bending over and keepin your mouth shut and throwing away your beliefs because your in love with money.
    McNabb is speaking from experience because he’s been there, he’s been in that position and knows what he’s talking about, you don’t.

  13. Krow says: Jan 28, 2010 9:25 AM

    You have to take anything McNabb says with a big grain of salt. Remember… up until recently he didn’t know games could end in a tie.

  14. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 9:26 AM

    birdmancometh says:
    January 28, 2010 9:04 AM
    Oh man, look at all of these out of work NFL GM’s hanging out on PFT. Someone give them a chance!
    ————————————–
    Yes, God forbid anyone should be allowed to have an opinion. Just go back to ESPN and let the talking heads spoon feed your opinions to you.

  15. gringostroika says: Jan 28, 2010 9:33 AM

    realitypolice is spot on. No advertiser will want to hire a guy that 50% of the audience is already turned off to. Players can have whatever political beliefs they want. But Tebow’s making terrible decisions for his career. And if he can’t make good decisions for his own career, what kind of poor decisions would he make in the pocket with a full blitz coming at him? More than one NFL scout is thinking exactly that right now.

  16. BeastyBills says: Jan 28, 2010 9:35 AM

    Tebow is part of a nut fringe group that consists of over half the US population-and that number is of folks who want abortion banned. The number of people who find the act immoral is over 60 %. Doesn’t seem all that fringe to me. As far as Tebow and football, the kid has got to try to play QB. If he fails, he can play H-back. It’s not like that is a difficult position to play anyway.

  17. WarrenMoonGOAT says: Jan 28, 2010 9:41 AM

    a team took a chance on Vick who most likely had majority of the country wishing he spent the rest of his life behind bars…why the heck wouldn’t a GM not take a chance on Tebow? omg because he believes abortion is wrong? get out of here with your liberalism

  18. .VoxVeritas says: Jan 28, 2010 9:48 AM

    “Still, I don’t think it’s overly dramatic to say that given the fact that Tebow, like most pro athletes, will earn a great majority of the money he will earn in his entire life in the next 10-12 years, that he should maximize that potential and stay away from making missteps that could cost him millions, like being a puppet for FOTF.”
    You think he’s a puppet only because you don’t like the message. There’s a dose of reality for you. I love how a bunch of hourly workers think that they’re qualified to give career and financial advice to a soon-to-be millionaire.

  19. raw B says: Jan 28, 2010 9:56 AM

    You are right, the Andy Reid – Mcnabb combo wont work. Reid needs a pocket passer (ACCURATE) and Mcnabb needs a strong running game and a longball threat WR.

  20. rolltide says: Jan 28, 2010 9:58 AM

    Kind of a Tebow hater here, and not especially religious, but I think it’s laughable how people think Tebow is taking a poison pill in regards to marketing by making a commercial on a subject he believes passionately in. There might not be many Tebow jerseys selling in the East Village or San Francisco, doesn’t mean they’re not going to sell out.

  21. getagrip says: Jan 28, 2010 10:07 AM

    He’s supposed to provide for the future of his children’s children?
    I didn’t realize that having NFL talent meant that you were supposed to sponsor future generations of spoiled trust fund brats.

  22. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 10:12 AM

    Vox says:
    You think he’s a puppet only because you don’t like the message. There’s a dose of reality for you. I love how a bunch of hourly workers think that they’re qualified to give career and financial advice to a soon-to-be millionaire.
    —————————
    Has nothing to do with the message. My feeling would be the same if he came out with a SB ad saying he thought abortion should be legal and free for everyone. My point was, and I will speak slowly and use small words so you will understand, is that the athletes who make the most money from product endorsements are the ones who keep their mouths shut. Do you know what Michael Jordan, Dwayne Wade, or Peyton Manning think about abortion? Of course not, and you never will, because they are too smart to hurt their marketability by shooting their mouths off.

  23. shea801 says: Jan 28, 2010 10:14 AM

    cobrala2 said:
    I get your point- most people do have a hard time thinking very far down the road, and certainly that applies to almost all NFL players. However, I think we can safely assume that Tebow plans on having children in the future, probably lots of them. And since they will be raised as he was, I don’t think it is too dramatic to envision a rather large family tree growing in the Tebow forest. And certainly they will have their own means of support. Still, I don’t think it’s overly dramatic to say that given the fact that Tebow, like most pro athletes, will earn a great majority of the money he will earn in his entire life in the next 10-12 years, that he should maximize that potential and stay away from making missteps that could cost him millions, like being a puppet for FOTF.
    —————————————-
    Your point it spot on. Logically, he should be looking at what he can do financially so his family can avoid, forever, the bullsh*t associated with not having enough money.
    What you’re overlooking is, he will be set for life, and his family (current and future) will be set too, simply from his faith. He can bank roll that into quite a fortune (think Kirk Cameron). To a person like Tebow, however, his faith trumps material and financial prosperity. His faith tells him that the financial matters are secondary to everything his faith tells him is far more important (spreading the word of God, helping others, giving himself to his faith, etc.). To him the message is more important than the financial ramifications of spreading said message. For a person as committed to the message as Tebow, the financial aspect of it doesn’t even enter the equation when it comes to speaking about his faith. To a degree, its admirable, but from the other side of the fence (where must of us PFT’ers sit) its ludicrous to do something that would prevent the flow of so much money.
    And I think McNabb’s statements are accurate. They are coming afterall, from a thin skinned nancy ;)

  24. Krow says: Jan 28, 2010 10:19 AM

    It’s not as if the religious nutjobs want people to reconsider their decisions to have an abortion. They want to force them… by law … to not have one.
    They’re like the Taliban in that regard. God speaks to them… and they speak to the masses.
    And it’s not a question of majority rule. It’s a question of individual rights. At one point the majority didn’t want women to vote… at one point the majority allowed children to work in textile mills. This ‘60% majority’ has no right to legislate anything based on their personal morality myths. And that’s the crowd Tebow is throwing in with… and that’s why it’s wrong and he’s a fool.

  25. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 10:23 AM

    BeastyBills says:
    January 28, 2010 9:35 AM
    Tebow is part of a nut fringe group that consists of over half the US population-and that number is of folks who want abortion banned.
    ——————–
    Focus on the Family is not a right wing fringe group because they oppose abortion- they are a fringe group because they oppose birth control, sex education, legalized gambling, believe that homsexuality can be “cured”, think AIDS is God’s wrath against homosexuals and favor heavy censorship of the media. They are enemies of the U.S. Constitution because they believe that Christian beliefs should guide U.S. policy in all areas.
    Any group that refuses to condemn lunatics murdering doctors is a fringe group in my book.

  26. donut shop says: Jan 28, 2010 10:26 AM

    Hey BeastyBills —
    I’d like to know where you get your facts. As they say on wikipedia, [ citation needed ].
    Funny, where I’m getting my facts [ http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=830 ], it looks like more people favor Roe vs Wade than oppose it.
    Let me quote:
    “The latest Harris Poll finds that support for Roe v. Wade has increased fairly significantly in a relatively short time. A majority – 56 percent – now favors the U.S. Supreme Court decision, the highest level since 1998 and an increase of seven percentage points from just last year when a slender 49 to 47 percent is supported the decision. Furthermore, only 20 percent of U.S. adults favor not permitting a woman to get an abortion under any circumstances.”

  27. birdmancometh says: Jan 28, 2010 10:32 AM

    @realitypolice
    Having an opinion is one thing. Saying something like “Tebow will never make it as a QB” is being closed minded. If anything, the people making those comments are the ones being poisened by ESPN.
    Nobody can say for sure that he won’t be a good NFL QB. We see people laugh in the face of convention all the time. It’s ignorant and elementary to make a statement like that.

  28. realitypolice says: Jan 28, 2010 10:37 AM

    “And it’s not a question of majority rule. It’s a question of individual rights. At one point the majority didn’t want women to vote… at one point the majority allowed children to work in textile mills. This ‘60% majority’ has no right to legislate anything based on their personal morality myths. ”
    ————————————————–
    I wish I had written that. An excellent analysis of what America is supposed to be all about.

  29. dave519 says: Jan 28, 2010 10:54 AM

    This guy just doesn’t really care, it’s the same B.S. out of his mouth every year, now he comes out with finishing what he started, are you kidding me? First and formost you have to have the b—-s and secondly the smarts, which he fails miserably in both. What’s really sad is the philly fans don’t realize he got 24 mil added to his deal this past year, Do you honestly believe he’s worth it?

  30. .VoxVeritas says: Jan 28, 2010 10:54 AM

    Well there you go. Manning, Jordan and Wade have a different god that they bow to. Money. Some people think other things are more important. Tebow’s going to have plenty of money. You don’t need to be a billionaire to provide for your family and all that money will mean nothing when you’re lying on a death bed and evaluating the way that you’ve lived your life. If they believe in heaven, surely they’re smart enough to know that all that money won’t buy them a ticket in. I’m not a Tebow fan but I am a fan of people walking as they talk. Everytime I’ve heard him talk about what’s important to him, his faith is always #1. I doubt any endorsement dollars are going to be steered away from him because of this, though. Not anything big enough to make a real difference anyway.

  31. Big_Monkey says: Jan 28, 2010 11:08 AM

    If the Eagles are smart, they will trade McNabb. They can get some value for him before he becomes a free agent after next season.
    This is not a bash on McNabb. I’m just being realistic in terms of trying to run an organization. If they thought highly enough of Kolb to use a 2nd rounder on him, then it’s time they make him the #1 QB.
    Eagles will draft a QB this off-season and possibly pick up a free agent or two in order to offset the loss of Vick, and possibly McNabb.

  32. BeastyBills says: Jan 28, 2010 11:37 AM

    Hey Donut Shop,
     
    My facts below.
     
    CNSNews.com- After 37 years of legalized abortion, 56 percent of all Americans still say it is morally wrong – and 58 percent of those aged 18 to 29 take that position.  (Marist Institute of Public Opinion)
    Reuters (May 15, 2009):  Gallup first: More Americans now “pro-life” than “pro-choice”.
     
    Go ahead and search the articles and read them if you want.  My point is simply that it’s not wrong for someone to have a belief and preach about it.  It hurts no one.  Tebow can do whatever he likes.  The people on these boards act as if Tebow being pro-life is worth than Vick killing dogs, or drunk idiots (Marshawn included) hitting people with cars.  Please.

  33. laeagle says: Jan 28, 2010 11:38 AM

    The easter bunny speaks directly to me and tells me that Tebow is an ass. And he also tells me that Vox’s god is the almighty Jones unit.

  34. laeagle says: Jan 28, 2010 11:40 AM

    Given the state of the defense, I don’t think it’s wise to ditch McNabb. You can’t tell me that Kolb gives them as good a chance to win next year as McNabb. Not saying he’s the best in the league or anything, but for next year, he’s the best shot we have. Maybe not in 2011 but for next year, definitely.

  35. T-Money says: Jan 28, 2010 12:04 PM

    I think the Eagles are certainly open to the idea of trading McNabb, but in the end it will not happen because they will not be offered what they think he is worth. McNabb will hang on until if/when he gets out played by Kolb (or another future drafted QB) in training camp and losses his job to him. Once that happens, they will offer him a minimal deal to remain as the back-up, which he will probably decline to do & then he will be released (not unlike what happened with Brian Dawkins). The Eagles will hold on to McNabb until they feel they have gotten everything they can out of him and he has zero trade value left. It won’t help that not too many teams will end up being interested in him. Al Davis is committed to Russell, AZ owes Leinart too much money next year to bring in another high priced QB & the Vikings probably won’t want to take a chance of paying all that money to McNabb only to find out in August that Favre has changed his mind and is willing to come back for one more year. In the end, any team that would be interested in McNabb will find that they can get Michael Vick for a lot less money and they may see him as having a little more upside due to his younger age.

  36. donut shop says: Jan 28, 2010 12:12 PM

    BeastyBills —
    cheers, sir. at least you have information to back up your point. all i can ask for.

  37. toe-to-toe bird law says: Jan 28, 2010 12:18 PM

    .VoxVeritas says:
    January 28, 2010 10:54 AM
    Well there you go. Manning, Jordan and Wade have a different god that they bow to. Money. Some people think other things are more important. Tebow’s going to have plenty of money. You don’t need to be a billionaire to provide for your family and all that money will mean nothing when you’re lying on a death bed and evaluating the way that you’ve lived your life. If they believe in heaven, surely they’re smart enough to know that all that money won’t buy them a ticket in. I’m not a Tebow fan but I am a fan of people walking as they talk. Everytime I’ve heard him talk about what’s important to him, his faith is always #1. I doubt any endorsement dollars are going to be steered away from him because of this, though. Not anything big enough to make a real difference anyway.
    ———————————————–
    Thoughts on religion from a guy who hates everything. Priceless.
    So Manning, Jordan and Wade are slaves to the dollar because they don’t force feed their beliefs to the public, similar to Hollywood celebrities using their clout to sway the their followers’ political stance? Please. Tell me, who has a greater impact on the world, Tim Tebow, who broadcasts his religious beliefs to the world and could possibly flame out in the NFL in 3 seasons, or Peyton Manning, who happily signs his advertising contracts with a grin, pushes a product, and then redistributes the wealth to those he feels need it most.? Check the link below for some of his charitable donations.
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/colts/2007-09-05-manning-hospital_N.htm

  38. slipkid says: Jan 28, 2010 12:47 PM

    why does wealth have to be “redistributed”? cant everyone go work hard?

  39. toe-to-toe bird law says: Jan 28, 2010 1:49 PM

    slipkid says:
    January 28, 2010 12:47 PM
    why does wealth have to be “redistributed”? cant everyone go work hard?
    ————————————————
    “Redistributed” as in donated to children’s hospitals. I’m not sure why you’re taking issue with charities.

  40. penguininbondage says: Jan 28, 2010 6:46 PM

    I have no problem with the god freaks or anyone that wants to donate to charity or whatever the hell you want to call it.
    I do however have a major problem with them when they feel the need to tell me how to live, what to support and how much i donate.

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