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Minimum salaries still apply in uncapped year

We’ve mentioned several times that the disappearance of the salary cap also will result in the disappearance of the salary floor.  And though we’ll be posting on Wednesday a full-blown look at the uncapped year, there’s an important point we need to make, primarily because we’re currently thinking of it.

The evaporation of the salary floor doesn’t mean that the NFL will be able to offer minimum-wage salaries to free agents.  Even without a salary floor, the league and the union have agreed to minimum annual salaries that will apply even without a spending minimum.

So a spending minimum remains, as determined by the minimum annual salary for each player based on his total years of experience.

In 2010, it means that a player with no credited seasons will receive at least $320,000.  For players with one credited season, the minimum salary is $395,000.  For players with two credited seasons, the minimum is $470,000.  For players with three credited seasons, the minimum is $545,000.

For players with four to six credited seasons, the minimum pay if $630,000.

Seven to nine?  $755,000.

And for players with ten or more seasons, the minimum salary is $855,000.

That last number could end up hurting older players.  Though the “minimum salary benefit” enabled teams to sign players with four or more years of service at a salary cap charge equivalent to the salary of a player with two years of service, it has no purpose or application in an uncapped year.  In a season where the only cap will be the artificial limit known as a budget, teams could be more inclined to go younger — and thus cheaper.

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11 Responses to “Minimum salaries still apply in uncapped year”
  1. wingslions76 says: Mar 2, 2010 7:02 PM

    “minimum” – cool looking word in this font.

  2. 4ever19 says: Mar 2, 2010 7:05 PM

    How many players with 10 or more seasons are there? How many now make less than this minimum? If they get cut, it won’t be because teams have to pay them 855K. It will be because they make much more than that. Performance, of course, won’t enter into it.

  3. similis says: Mar 2, 2010 7:21 PM

    Why would they be inclined to go cheaper?
    They were paying the full amount out of their pockets before, why would they stop now?
    It was only a fake savings, not a real one and they don’t need to get under a cap now, so there’s no reason to be cute with the numbers.
    I don’t see it changing anything.

  4. smashmouthd says: Mar 2, 2010 7:28 PM

    This is a season where, unless you are a player or two away from realistically being in the SB next year… the smart teams will dump every 30something player that is not a critical component of their team and load up on draft picks and Undrafted Free Agents and build a strong core of players to go into 2011 and beyond with.
    This is a year to get your books straight, even at the cost of competitiveness for the season, so that your team can be ahead of the game for the next few years after 2010.

  5. .VoxVeritas says: Mar 2, 2010 8:36 PM

    aluminum minimum aluminium alimentum racecar spelled backwards is racecar.

  6. DocBG says: Mar 2, 2010 8:48 PM

    # 4ever19 says: March 2, 2010 7:05 PM
    How many players with 10 or more seasons are there? How many now make less than this minimum? If they get cut, it won’t be because teams have to pay them 855K. It will be because they make much more than that. Performance, of course, won’t enter into it.
    ——————————————————
    Curious if stuff like this applies to kickers and punters? most of them are in the league for a long time, and it would be hard to imagine that all of them are making much more than this.

  7. daveomcd says: Mar 2, 2010 8:50 PM

    “You better get organized… quick!” – Frank Costello (The Departed)

  8. Route36West says: Mar 3, 2010 1:23 AM

    So actually the salary floor is 16,960,000.
    and thats only if some team decides to cut every player and sign all rookies.

  9. SF Saints Fan says: Mar 3, 2010 1:37 AM

    The reason that this will have an impact is not the lack of a salary cap, but the lack of a salary floor. Cheap teams could afford to have more expensive backup players because they had to stay above the salary floor. Now they can just sign rookies and second year guys to fill out their rosters.
    It will be interesting to see if we truly find out what each team is paying their players and what their actual payrolls will be on opening day.
    Will anybody go real “cheap” and just skate by this season? Especially one or more of the teams that have owners with shaky finances?

  10. SixburghDynasty says: Mar 3, 2010 6:28 AM

    Wow that league minimium is insane for 10+ year vets. I understand longevity in the league should mean a lot but honestly that really does hurt the players. Who would say a Matt Stover or an Orlando Pace is worth 855k at least now?

  11. BLACKQBWHITERB says: Mar 3, 2010 7:53 AM

    Dan Snyder Please pay that Ethan Albright. I know he’s old, but there ain’t no better long snapper in the NFL. He has NEVER even once blown a long snap for the Redskins, in years and years and years.
    Sadly, specialists will be the ones hurt by this over 10 year minimum thing, if anyone is.

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