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NFL attendance expected to fall to lowest level since 1998

Blame it on the recession.  Blame it on higher ticket prices.  Or blame it on how awesome and affordable HDTVs have become.

Whatever the reason, there are fewer NFL fans buying tickets than anytime since 1998. Eric Grubman, executive vice president of NFL Ventures and Business Operations, told USA Today that attendance is expected to drop 1-2% this year. 

Season ticket sales should fall 5%, but teams will make up some ground with single ticket and partial season ticket sales.  Teams still keep charging more, however.  The average ticket price raised rose 3.9% to $74.99 last season, according to the report.

“We know some of our fans are struggling. We don’t need to see the statistics,” Grubman said.  He acknowledged some fans prefer to just watch more games at home.

“The product is really exceptional at home. That makes
it a little bit easier, if you’re having a tough time making ends meet,
to not go to the stadium,” Grubman said.

Rising television (and internet) viewers soften the decline in attendance, but an increasing number of blackouts would make it difficult for that trend to continue.

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65 Responses to “NFL attendance expected to fall to lowest level since 1998”
  1. gm12086 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:35 PM

    “The average ticket price raised rose 3.9% to $74.99 last season, according to the report.”
    Proofreading……..What a concept.

  2. downwithdansnyder says: Sep 1, 2010 8:35 PM

    Let’s see. One can buy an entire home big screen package for the cost of a family going to 2 games. Oh yeh, and that family gets to have that same system the other 363 days per year(assuming they only go to two games). Seems like a no brainer to me. $75×4=$300 and then say another $100 for parking and food/drink(could easily be 2x that if you actually buy anything) and it totals $800-$1k for TWO games. No wonder all the non-season ticket holding skins fans have turned into A$$ holes. I no longer go because of the environment. And because I don’t want Fat Albert to have any of my ticket money.

  3. FinFan68 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:36 PM

    Here comes the pay-per-view BS. They are blaming TV for the attendence decline so they will charge to watch the games. They will say they have to in order to keep the league afloat. Let’s not forget that the league is making billions…and overpaying the players is why their profits are not what they would expect. PPV ruined boxing, and it will ruin the NFL

  4. Cincinnasty says: Sep 1, 2010 8:37 PM

    If you’re going recognize the recession as a problem and a reason for the sales dropping than there ought to be some sort of action taken to keep fans happy.. Lower the prices in the markets that it maybe needed or get rid of the blackouts..

  5. WNYhell5 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:38 PM

    If people can’t afford to go, AND they can’t watch it on TV, then they’ll stop paying attention. Which would be even worse for the NFL. They will either need to lower prices or soften the blackout rule. People who have been forgotten by the NFL won’t be buying official overpriced NFL merch, either.

  6. America Needs Brett Favre says: Sep 1, 2010 8:39 PM

    First post.

  7. Laxer37 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:42 PM

    Meanwhile the Steelers season ticket waiting list is sitting at about a 20-year wait.
    2010 single game seats went on sale two months ago and sold out in roughly 8 minutes.
    And this is on the heals of a 9-7 season (thats as bad as it gets is Pittsburgh).

  8. wtfChiefs says: Sep 1, 2010 8:45 PM

    Here’s why….is a hell of a lot cheaper and better to watch on TV!!

  9. Roscoe P. Coaltrain says: Sep 1, 2010 8:47 PM

    Ok so charge the network more if it’s nicer on tv. I pay all this money to the cable company and I still gotta watch lame ass commercials!!!! Don’t threaten me with that blackout crap!!!! I’m tired of NFL fans being threatened all the time! Piss off

  10. PDog755 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:48 PM

    Yeah $75 to see a game is outrageous. I would definitely rather watch the game in HD, where I know some fat, smelly and obnoxious dude won’t be sitting in front of me….

  11. mikebyrne1502 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:50 PM

    The NFL survives off of its fans, if we were to stop going to games all together they would still be forced to televise games, how else would they make any money? Not to mention there are a lot of teams that aren’t that great right now, so if you live in a small city and your team blows, why would you want to waist money on a rebuilding team when you can watch them get there ass kicked on tv?

  12. mikebyrne1502 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:50 PM

    The NFL survives off of its fans, if we were to stop going to games all together they would still be forced to televise games, how else would they make any money? Not to mention there are a lot of teams that aren’t that great right now, so if you live in a small city and your team blows, why would you want to waist money on a rebuilding team when you can watch them get there ass kicked on tv?

  13. biggdogg463 says: Sep 1, 2010 8:56 PM

    I love the NFL but now that I have kids I can’t afford to go to the games. I can afford a major league baseball game or two with the kids a year but its hard to afford to take the family out to an NFL game especially when for less than a third of the price we can go to the USF games. With the Black outs for the Bucs this year I am glad that I can still watch some great college football on tv and that I have the NFL network. Still hope one day to be able to say that Im a season ticket holder.

  14. cheatriots says: Sep 1, 2010 9:01 PM

    Lower ticket prices so everybody can afford them and it won’t be a problem.

  15. rbilotta says: Sep 1, 2010 9:03 PM

    While the USATODAY article mentioned several reasons for people staying at home, I also think another unmentioned factor for people staying away is the stadium architecture or design. Almost all new stadiums, while looking nicer and and maybe better constructed, have moved the average persons seats *farther* away from field. I think the Broncos Invesco was one example. The Broncos old Mile High was loud, and gave such a home field advantage . The new stadium isn’t intimidating or loud anymore. If move people away from the field, they are more isolated and maybe could just be at home.

  16. Rumplestilskin says: Sep 1, 2010 9:04 PM

    The NFL, like every other big business in this economy, is taking its lumps….10 -30 % decreases across the board…..what I dont like is the way they let Jacksonville take the brunt of the bad PR nationally.

  17. BigSuede says: Sep 1, 2010 9:09 PM

    I am really confused as to those worried about blackouts. It is so easy to get games from the internet and avoid blackouts it is ridiculous…
    It would seem to me the NFL should revise their blackout rules to keep fans from understanding how easy it is to get pirated football streams off the net

  18. joetoronto says: Sep 1, 2010 9:11 PM

    Or blame it on how awesome and affordable HDTVs have become.
    ********************************************************
    I think that’s the #1 reason right there.

  19. BigBear123 says: Sep 1, 2010 9:12 PM

    With TV packages showing every team playing – excluding blackouts, there is enough football going on for everyone but the hardcore fans.
    I don’t see blackouts making a noticeable difference.

  20. Rumplestilskin says: Sep 1, 2010 9:17 PM

    This is no surprise…in this economy…the NFL wants to put out a front that they are not that affected by the economy (5% ??? give me a break) …probably closer to 15 % accross the board…buts its ok, they will let Jackonville take the brunt of the bad press from the national media (bunch of lemmings) about ticket sales. Have you seen a tampa game? Oakland? good luck filling those stadiums…its the year of the blackout.

  21. Fonetik says: Sep 1, 2010 9:18 PM

    Not a problem here in Philly.
    L.A. Jaguars… doesn’t sound right. Maybe they’ll change the name.

  22. Roger Goodell's a tool. says: Sep 1, 2010 9:21 PM

    Time to end the blackout rule.

  23. seanx says: Sep 1, 2010 9:24 PM

    Well, what were ticket sales like in the 1930s during the last Great Depression? Not too good, I bet. With unemployment “officially” at 10 percent, and probably really double that, who can afford to spend $500 to take their family to a game? That same game is on TV. Well, unless you live in Oakland,Detroit,Jacksonville, or Tampa.
    Which brings up another point…with basically half the league totally worthless, why spend the money to see your local team lose?

  24. Zukny says: Sep 1, 2010 9:26 PM

    maybe i will finally be able to find tickets to an Eagles Game?

  25. tombrookshire says: Sep 1, 2010 9:28 PM

    In the not so distant future, the games will be played soley for the TV, iPhone and computer audience anyway. The crowd in the stands is window dressing. There will still be a clamour for tickets, yet, the NFL sees it’s future like all businesses do, overseas. If they are able to make the game popular, that is, to foster global gambling on the games with the NFL getting a piece, the stadium crowd and the price of admission will be secondary revenues to them. Without the gambling element, the NFL would never reach the global popularity of soccer.

  26. Chrisl4064 says: Sep 1, 2010 9:38 PM

    Everybody say “Thanks Tampa”

  27. Wonderlicker says: Sep 1, 2010 9:40 PM

    “Meanwhile the Steelers season ticket waiting list is sitting at about a 20-year wait.”
    Like there’s anything else to do in Pittsburg.

  28. Little Tommy says: Sep 1, 2010 9:41 PM

    Here comes the pay-per-view BS. They are blaming TV for the attendence decline so they will charge to watch the games. They will say they have to in order to keep the league afloat. Let’s not forget that the league is making billions…and overpaying the players is why their profits are not what they would expect. PPV ruined boxing, and it will ruin the NFL
    **********************************************
    Yea right…I’ll be paying to watch the Bears at home!

  29. joetoronto says: Sep 1, 2010 9:41 PM

    WNYhell5 says: September 1, 2010 8:38 PM
    If people can’t afford to go, AND they can’t watch it on TV, then they’ll stop paying attention. Which would be even worse for the NFL. They will either need to lower prices or soften the blackout rule. People who have been forgotten by the NFL won’t be buying official overpriced NFL merch, either.
    ********************************************************
    This is exactly what happened to the CFL many years ago.
    They kept blacking out games and before they knew it, they had lost generations of fans.
    The NFL is on a slippery slope, they’d better be careful.

  30. Little Tommy says: Sep 1, 2010 9:43 PM

    Here comes the pay-per-view BS. They are blaming TV for the attendence decline so they will charge to watch the games. They will say they have to in order to keep the league afloat. Let’s not forget that the league is making billions…and overpaying the players is why their profits are not what they would expect. PPV ruined boxing, and it will ruin the NFL
    **********************************************
    Yea right…I’ll be paying to watch the Bears at home!

  31. Brewster says: Sep 1, 2010 9:46 PM

    We know some of our fans are struggling. We don’t need to see the statistics,” Grubman said.
    ______________
    What he didn’t say is we don’t really give a *uck we’re going to (encourage our teams) keep raising ticket prices as long and by as much as we can, because we’re one greedy bunch of *ricks.
    When you pay your top execs like this you have to get all you can while you can:
    Roger Goodell earned $2.9 million in base pay and $9.76 million in overall compensation, including bonuses and deferred pay, in the fiscal year that ended March 31, 2009
    Steve Bornstein, head of NFL Media and NFL Network: $7.44 million.
    –Jeff Pash, chief labor negotiator and general counsel: $4.85 million.
    –Eric Grubman, executive vice president, marketing and sponsorships: $4.44 million.
    –Former commissioner Paul Tagliabue (outside consultant): $3.3 million.
    –Joe Browne, executive vice president of communications: $1.7 million.
    –Ray Anderson, executive vice president, football operations: $1.12 million.
    –Anthony Noto, chief financial officer: $853,000.
    $30 mil for the top 8 execs, no wonder ticket prices ae as high as they are.

  32. sportsdrenched says: Sep 1, 2010 9:48 PM

    Where does this black-out theory come from?
    Why make it harder for the fans to have access to your product?
    It’s just a perfect storm of all the issues mentioned above, and the NFL is not alone. And I can’t figure out how the blackout rules makes any business sense.
    I’m within driving distance of 4 D1 College Football Programs and for the price of two NFL games I could buy season tickets at 3 of the 4.
    Like any market adjustment. Prices will come down eventually. If they don’t more people will stay home.

  33. NOwillrepeat says: Sep 1, 2010 9:51 PM

    I know the Superdome wont have any problems fillin up on Sundays…

  34. Ufanforreal says: Sep 1, 2010 10:00 PM

    You would think this money hungry company would realize they are pricing them self out of business.

  35. brtaylor33 says: Sep 1, 2010 10:05 PM

    I can’t stand the Steelers and Cowboys just because of the fact they have soooooooo many bandwagon fans. It’s repulsive. Sorry, has nothing to do with the topic but Laxer37 just made me think about it. Most Steelers fans probably couldn’t even find Pittsburgh on a map.

  36. RexR#1 says: Sep 1, 2010 10:08 PM

    Start and end the list with the PSL scam that is the final straw. Greedball sons of money now own and run these teams NOT their grandfathers/fathers who built the league from scratch.

  37. aj says: Sep 1, 2010 10:09 PM

    Sounds like a good time for a lockout.
    Texans sold a record 64,355 season tickets this year btw.

  38. Chadman says: Sep 1, 2010 10:12 PM

    Nope still making a good living just don’t feel like sitting in the cold and spending that kind of money to watch the crap ass team they put on the field in Chicago. You want to sell tickets clean house and start winning!!!

  39. INTENSEG says: Sep 1, 2010 10:14 PM

    If you are in any kind of business you must be willing to be flexible and evolve with your customers. The blackout rule should not be a punishment to fans who love their team but can’t afford to go to the games. Will half the league need to blackout before the NFL realizes this rule needs to be lifted. They are playing chicken with the fans and they are going to lose. REMEMBER IF WE DON’T COME TO GAMES OR WATCH IT ON TV, YOU LOSE. So if we cant make it to the games or you refuse to make the tickets afforable a family (not just one fan) at least allow fans to watch it on TV. Get rid of the blackout rule.

  40. Wukong says: Sep 1, 2010 10:18 PM

    It has way more to do with the economy than anything else. Do a search on season ticket waiting lists and see how things shape up for places like Buffalo, Cleveland, and Detroit. It’s pathetic. Then there’s Jacksonville, which is a disaster of epic proportions even in a good economy. And it’s not a market size issue, either. New Orleans has a waiting list 60k deep despite being one of the smaller markets. Green Bay, the smallest market, has a list of over 80k.
    The really bad markets are dragging down the league as a whole in terms of attendance.

  41. CanadianVikingFan says: Sep 1, 2010 10:19 PM

    Stop jacking up the prices of shitty food at the concessions.

  42. dafish says: Sep 1, 2010 11:09 PM

    NOwillrepeat says:
    September 1, 2010 9:51 PM
    I know the Superdome wont have any problems fillin up on Sundays…
    ——————————-
    FEMA money is a wonderful thing.
    Wukong says:
    September 1, 2010 10:18 PM
    It has way more to do with the economy than anything else. Do a search on season ticket waiting lists and see how things shape up for places like Buffalo, Cleveland, and Detroit. It’s pathetic. Then there’s Jacksonville, which is a disaster of epic proportions even in a good economy. And it’s not a market size issue, either. New Orleans has a waiting list 60k deep despite being one of the smaller markets. Green Bay, the smallest market, has a list of over 80k.
    The really bad markets are dragging down the league as a whole in terms of attendance.
    ——————————
    Speaking of search and research, you sound like an intelligent enough person, how can you use 1 year as the overall barometer of the Jaguars? To me, you’re simply parroting the national media’s take that Jacksonville is not an NFL calibur city, even though there were 20 total blackouts and the Raiders had the same exact number of blackouts as did the Jags. You cannot seriously compare the Packers and the Jags, there’s about 4 generations of fans difference.
    Look, the NFL sustained due to parity, you know, the whole “any given Sunday” mantra. The league is only as strong as the weakest teams. Flash back to 2008 when the Jaguars were the sexy pick to win it all that offseason. We had a waiting list. But, we had a perfect storm of about 20,000 people who did not renew tickets a sluggish economy and a team who did nothing at all with the local community.
    Anyway, my point is, don’t let the truth get in the way of a good story.

  43. dafish says: Sep 1, 2010 11:10 PM

    NOwillrepeat says:
    September 1, 2010 9:51 PM
    I know the Superdome wont have any problems fillin up on Sundays…
    ——————————-
    FEMA money is a wonderful thing.
    Wukong says:
    September 1, 2010 10:18 PM
    It has way more to do with the economy than anything else. Do a search on season ticket waiting lists and see how things shape up for places like Buffalo, Cleveland, and Detroit. It’s pathetic. Then there’s Jacksonville, which is a disaster of epic proportions even in a good economy. And it’s not a market size issue, either. New Orleans has a waiting list 60k deep despite being one of the smaller markets. Green Bay, the smallest market, has a list of over 80k.
    The really bad markets are dragging down the league as a whole in terms of attendance.
    ——————————
    Speaking of search and research, you sound like an intelligent enough person, how can you use 1 year as the overall barometer of the Jaguars? To me, you’re simply parroting the national media’s take that Jacksonville is not an NFL calibur city, even though there were 20 total blackouts and the Raiders had the same exact number of blackouts as did the Jags. You cannot seriously compare the Packers and the Jags, there’s about 4 generations of fans difference.
    Look, the NFL sustained due to parity, you know, the whole “any given Sunday” mantra. The league is only as strong as the weakest teams. Flash back to 2008 when the Jaguars were the sexy pick to win it all that offseason. We had a waiting list. But, we had a perfect storm of about 20,000 people who did not renew tickets a sluggish economy and a team who did nothing at all with the local community.
    Anyway, my point is, don’t let the truth get in the way of a good story.

  44. jebdamone says: Sep 1, 2010 11:13 PM

    the thing about it is not only has the recession made it difficult but inflation has been a heavy burden. i make a very good living and i have a tough time going to games because unless you are sitting in a very good seat i would rather watch the games on my 65 inch tv. good seats are running in the 200 range for my vikes, and coupled with the price of gas, parking, beer and dogs at the game it is really difficult to pony that up over the comforts of my home.

  45. toe-to-toe bird law says: Sep 1, 2010 11:13 PM

    To borrow a line from the lawyer in Jurassic Park, “What, we’ll have, uh, a coupon day or something.”

  46. joe6606 says: Sep 1, 2010 11:14 PM

    I go to several NFL games per year, and the fact is…
    the viewing experience at home is enormously better than even the very best seat at the stadium.
    there’s just no way around the fact that watching football live at the stadium, is a very frustrating experience. You cannot visualize what is going on or where the ball is nearly as well as you can while watching it on tv,
    Plus, you get replays, instant feedback on injuries and substitutions which you simply dont get at the game.
    Of course, you also have to deal with traffic, high tix prices, outrageous concession costs, etc, etc that you completely avoid at home.

  47. bofarr says: Sep 1, 2010 11:19 PM

    I would much rather sit at home with my 47″ LCD, $15 twelve pack of craft brew, reasonably priced home made food, store bought snacks for less than 10 bucks and enjoy the games with friends than get raped for convenience fees, parking fees, PSLs, then pay $12 for cheap watery beer, $10 for a crappy pizza made the night before and of course at least 50 bucks for a decent seat next to a drunk a-hole.

  48. dan073eb says: Sep 1, 2010 11:20 PM

    @ Wukong “Then there’s Jacksonville, which is a disaster of epic proportions even in a good economy. And it’s not a market size issue, either.”
    It’s not a market size issue? Really? Last I checked Jacksonville was a small market team.
    “New Orleans has a waiting list 60k deep despite being one of the smaller markets. Green Bay, the smallest market, has a list of over 80k.”
    Let’s take a look at when these teams were founded…
    New Orleans- 1967
    Green Bay- 1919
    (Jacksonville 1995)
    So that gives New Orleans a 28 year head start and the packers a 76 year head start on the jags as far as creating a huge fanbase and waiting list for tickets. Plus I’m sure winning both teams winning superbowls doesn’t hurt either. All will come in time for the jags.

  49. harloeisdead says: Sep 1, 2010 11:23 PM

    wukong- my hope that you are joking about the “disaster of epic proportions even in a good economy” is completely sincere, sir. if not, i’m going to be forced to have to proceed filing you under “tard”.

  50. JoeSixPack says: Sep 1, 2010 11:23 PM

    more posturing fodder for the CBA negotiations
    setting the players up for some givebacks
    hopefully a lockout can be averted

  51. MitchAlbom'sEars says: Sep 2, 2010 12:00 AM

    Reasons not to go to a NFL game:
    PSL
    Ticket Prices
    Fat Mouthly Slob in front of your seat
    Parking
    Concession Prices
    HDTV
    My biggest peeve is this situation:
    First drive of game results in Touchdown.
    After PAT we get 3-5 minutes commercial.
    Then KickOff followed by 3-5 minutes of commercials.
    It is a slow death at a stadium.
    I’d rather be home and make a sandwich or grab a drink or better yet switch to a game that is on.
    College Football is way better game day experience and much more affordable. (Less slobs and more co-ed’s)

  52. JSpicoli says: Sep 2, 2010 12:01 AM

    I’ve been saying for two years, here comes contraction. The alternative is worse. This league is about to screw itself out of pole position in USA sports.

  53. Tinbender says: Sep 2, 2010 12:27 AM

    To add to my rant, growing up in Oakland in the sixties I made enough on my newpaper route to buy tickets to Raiders games. The sheer greed of the owners and players has ruined the game for all but the rich.

  54. NinerNation says: Sep 2, 2010 12:51 AM

    If you have NFL Sunday Ticket(like I do) then it is PPV.

  55. KevinKolb4SB says: Sep 2, 2010 12:51 AM

    It’s the economy. 2 years ago I could have sold my tickets at a decent profit. This year, I had to sell half and had to take lesser games and sold them at a slight loss to do it. Companies don’t have extra spending money.

  56. Laxer37 says: Sep 2, 2010 1:49 AM

    JoeSixPack nailed it.
    The league leaks these reports of gloom and doom, everyone buys into it, and the players lose some leverage.
    Every ticket dollar they lose will just get tacked on to the next TV contract they sign. More empty seats means more TV viewers, which means the TV package is more valuable. TV networks will be willing to pay more because they can charge their advertisers more to reach the increased audience.
    (Of course the advertisers then pass their increased cost on to the consumers, so were all paying regardless).

  57. seanx says: Sep 2, 2010 1:58 AM

    “All will come in time for the jags.”
    But it will be in San Antonio, not Jacksonville.

  58. Big mike says: Sep 2, 2010 2:14 AM

    This whole ticket thing is a big f’in shake down. Ticketmaster sold out of jacksonville jaguars tickets in a matter of 3 mintues on august 28th 2010. But yet there in danger of being blacked out every week. Ticketmaster gives its codes or whatever to stub hub and the rest of these f’in companies that sell tickets online and they buy ALL the damn tickets before they go on sale. So these companies jack up the prices on the tickets. I looked at jags tickets and 50 yard like was around 300 per ticket. Who the hell wants to pay that much to watch the jags play first off, second who wants to pay that in this economy????????????? Its all bullsh*t. And the best part is they wanna advertise “buy tickets other wise the games are gonna be blacked out. Come on fans!!!” 9:03 jags tickets were sold out. and they went on sale at 9! Its all a money making scheme. because face value is way less then what they charge. There never gonna get people in those seats when basketball, baseball, and hockey tickets are much cheaper. Especially when those sports LOWER ticket costs alot when there teams are not doing well. Football is gonna loose alot attendance

  59. Geetee52 says: Sep 2, 2010 2:46 AM

    It’s Bush’s fault. Now Obama will have to bail them out.

  60. Marty says: Sep 2, 2010 6:05 AM

    Jacksonville has sold a lot more tickets this year than last year. They have added 14,000 new season ticket holders. Jacksonville sold 62,000 tickets for the first preseason game. Tampa sold 42,000 for their first preseason game. Jacksonville has sold enough tickets to lift the blackouts for the first 5 regular season games.
    Jacksonville is not the problem.

  61. County K 66ers says: Sep 2, 2010 6:59 AM

    Goodell.

  62. The Briggadier says: Sep 2, 2010 7:07 AM

    Florio!
    You took a pass on me when I applied for the reporter position two years ago. I feel like Menalaus from the movie “Troy” when he says to Helen (about Paris), “This is what you left me for!”
    No offense to your boy Rosenthal, but every article he writes has significant typos in it. I would have done better. He doesn’t even have good information, just loosely knit theories.

  63. 1of40000 says: Sep 2, 2010 8:17 AM

    Hmmm, interesting. Tickets sales down in the rest of the NFL but up in Jacksonville (14,000 new season ticket sales). The Jags had a lot available which certainly makes it easier but its notable when a supposedly struggling franchise is out performing the market. Maybe we should start saying LA Bucs

  64. texasPHINSfan says: Sep 2, 2010 12:10 PM

    Meanwhile Major League Soccer’s attendance has been going up the last 3-4 years.
    I think this points largely to recession & prices. MLS matches are significantly cheaper, and you still get the big stadium experience.
    The added bonus is most of the players make wages similar to what we make, so they’re like the Everyman playing out on the field; easier to identify with than the NFL millionaires.

  65. Raiders757 says: Sep 2, 2010 3:15 PM

    # joetoronto says: September 1, 2010 9:11 PM
    Or blame it on how awesome and affordable HDTVs have become.
    ******************** ******************** ****************
    I think that’s the #1 reason right there.
    —————————————————
    All be it part of te reason, I don’t think it’s the #1 reason. The #1 reason is the cost of going to the games, period. I don’t live in my favorite team’s market, so I can’t go. I do have an HDTV, but I can’t get my team’s games because the NFL is greddy and won’t offer up an ala-carte pay-per-view package. Even if they did, it would probably still costs too much.
    The #1 reason is greed. Plain and simple.

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