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Broncos will meet Tuesday

The shock of Broncos wide receiver Kenny McKinley’s apparent suicide may take a long time to wear off for a team that has seen too many tragedies over the last four years.

Lindsay Jones of the Denver Post reports that coach Josh McDaniels called a team meeting a 10 AM Tuesday to talk about McKinley.   Grief counselors will be available to speak with players after the session. Tuesday is usually a day off for the team.

Many players heard the news while at a fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Club of Metro Denver, which houses the Darrent Williams Memorial Teen Center.  McKinley was 23 years old and is survived by a young son.

“It’s too fresh. I haven’t gotten my mind around it yet,” cornerback Champ Bailey told Jones.

Brandon Stokley remembered McKinley as one of the funniest guys he knew.  Other remembrances of McKinley similarly focused on his bright personality.

The nature of McKinley’s passing, with no apparent warning signs, makes the tragedy hard to come to grips with.  On Tuesday, the organization begins the process of remembering McKinley and moving on together. 

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35 Responses to “Broncos will meet Tuesday”
  1. SAL MAGLUDA IS A DOLFAN says: Sep 21, 2010 11:10 AM

    So sad…Athletes have it all but why cant they just motivate themselves to live for the most important things like family.

  2. PriorKnowledge says: Sep 21, 2010 11:20 AM

    “apparent suicide” – all the facts aren’t in yet.
    maybe it is hard to believe because it is not true.

  3. georgeanderson says: Sep 21, 2010 11:24 AM

    Very sad. Hopefully McKinleys family will donate his brain for research to find out if this can be linked to brain trauma.
    A young man at 23 with what seems to be the world in front of him should not be taking his own life.

  4. broncoMaineiac says: Sep 21, 2010 11:27 AM

    So sad…some ignorant people actually believe that athletes “have it all” (whatever THAT means).
    They are people first, athletes second. Obviously, attaining professional goals does not always translate into happiness.

  5. TMFChiefs says: Sep 21, 2010 11:29 AM

    I think the fact that he’s an athlete is irrelevant. The fact of the matter is, this individual did the most selfish thing that someone can do. He took his own life…and in doing so, he left his son with out a father. But it doesn’t just stop there. What about his parents, siblings, friends??? Those are the people that need to be in our thoughts and prayers. This is just a senseless tragedy…and my heart hurts for that little boy.

  6. stiller43 says: Sep 21, 2010 11:30 AM

    1. SAL MAGLUDA IS A DOLFAN says: September 21, 2010 11:10 AM
    So sad…Athletes have it all but why cant they just motivate themselves to live for the most important things like family.
    ___________________________________
    Assuming the suicide was depression related, there’s often little rational thinking in what there is to live for. Depression can be nasty, and it can make people lose sense of reality, what is and isn’t important, and can make that person feel hopeless.
    Condolences

  7. GBfanForever says: Sep 21, 2010 11:32 AM

    I realize he had an illness but to leave behind a kid like that is unforgivable in my book. My thoughts are with his family.

  8. 2000TJ says: Sep 21, 2010 11:42 AM

    Look at your life. There are probably many people who think you “have it all” and have a great life? If you are not a happy person, then you will never be happy no matter how much money you have or what you do for a living.
    More money = more problems

  9. JungleClone says: Sep 21, 2010 11:46 AM

    I know people do things that don’t make sense all the time, but this really DOES NOT make sense….a stud in college with all the NFL potential in the world at only 23 years old????????

  10. Cornerdenizen says: Sep 21, 2010 11:47 AM

    @broncoMaineiac:
    Very well said. Too bad most guys here lack perspective.

  11. Iron Wolf says: Sep 21, 2010 11:57 AM

    TMF:
    What you say is true to an extent, but it sounds like you have not been close enough to someone who has seriously considered or followed through on such an act. What you consider selfish the sufferer considers merciful. It’s just very complicated and is something I know a bit about.

  12. queenie says: Sep 21, 2010 12:00 PM

    stupid people: it’s called depression and it can affect anybody at anytime and unless you have been affected by it you have no idea what you are talking about.
    This young man was obviously in a lot of pain and he thought that everyone’s life would be better if he was not in it…in his mind he was doing the right thing…..depressed people do not think clearly so everyone get the F off your high horse and start taking mental illness seriously or these senseless suicides will continue.

  13. Jon says: Sep 21, 2010 12:01 PM

    Anybody who is ripping him or wondering what the hell (he has it all?!?). You must not have been through depression or other mental health issues. Unless the person can decided for themselves they need help, they do not see options other than end their lives.
    The young man appears to have worked hard to reach his dream, but has been unable to participate in that dream for two years because of injury. All that hard work it takes to get to the NFL and bam bam two years of straight injuries.
    It is not uncommon for a severely depressed person to the life of the party and the biggest smile, because they do not understand their feelings and often are embarrassed by them.
    Godspeed to the family, team, and friends in dealing with this.

  14. raiderUfan says: Sep 21, 2010 12:08 PM

    Think of that little boy. He didn’t.
    It’ll be hard for the adults in his life but coming to grips will be a process they are able to deal with much more than that child. That’s the tradgedy here.
    I’m also sad for the Broncos. I can’t stand the team but the people don’t deserve to keep going through this.

  15. DEMOLITION says: Sep 21, 2010 12:15 PM

    Prayers to his family and friends. Such a selfish act

  16. longestlegs says: Sep 21, 2010 12:25 PM

    GBfanForever says:
    September 21, 2010 11:32 AM
    I realize he had an illness but to leave behind a kid like that is unforgivable in my book. My thoughts are with his family.
    ———————————————-
    Like a few rational people with perspective have said above, depression is a serious matter. Down to, and not limited to, an inability to process situations in any other way except to an unfortunate final conclusion.
    Its not selfish, its sad, and avoidable with the proper support and treatment.
    Condolences to the Broncos as well as Mr. McKinley’s friends and family.

  17. TheDPR says: Sep 21, 2010 12:26 PM

    Being injured, I wonder what medication he was on and whether it affected him mentally. Many drugs’ side effects can be depression.

  18. Brandon St. Randy says: Sep 21, 2010 12:51 PM

    tough day for the Broncos family. Willams, Nash and McKinley families in your thoughts.

  19. Jon Snow says: Sep 21, 2010 12:52 PM

    Notice that most of the classless comments are coming from the fans of Denver’s AFC West rivals. Wrong time and vehicle for veiled smack, fellas. Simply disgusting.
    RIP Kenny McKinley

  20. BoltsFan says: Sep 21, 2010 12:58 PM

    Thank God they’re flying grief counselors in. How in the world did society ever overcome the loss of human life until we discovered the vaunted grief counselors and their caring words of comfort???

  21. JoeSixPack says: Sep 21, 2010 1:17 PM

    Although it’s understandable that a great many people would note what a selfish act suicide is – do try to understand that those contemplating suicide are NOT thinking rationally.
    Suicide is the SECOND LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH among those McKinley’s age.
    If you’re looking for someone to blame, blame those among us who perpetuate the stigma of mental illness which prevents people like “big strong football players” from coming forward to seek help.
    People will bore you with details about everything from their ailing knee to their cancer treatment. They will talk openly about every organ in the body – EXCEPT the brain.
    Even in the Year 2010, they know that a great many people will view them as weak… as lesser men… as “crazy” – and suffer in silence until the pain can be so great that death seems like a rational alternative.
    We’ve got to break through the stigma – maybe some “big strong men” in the NFL stepping forward to encourage their colleagues and all people to get the help that’s available might help break through the stigma of mental illness so that people can lead the lives they were meant to live.

  22. DaVikes says: Sep 21, 2010 1:22 PM

    Just being injured can trigger depression, as it can disrupt so many things in your life. Been there. McKinley’s daily activities used to revolve around playing football with a team, and after being injured, revolved around therapy, which can be a lonely thing. Not making excuses for the guy, because it is a very sad decision that he made. But if you know someone who has been limping around a while, unable to do the things they love to do, give them a call and see how they are really doing.

  23. JoeSixPack says: Sep 21, 2010 1:43 PM

    @ BoltsFan
    Believe it or not, offering professional grief counselors at a time of tragedy can save lives and reduce pain and suffering of those friends and colleagues trying to come to terms with this sort of loss.
    These events can also be a trigger for those on the edge of depression and suicide themselves.
    Sometimes one crass or sarcastic remark is all it might take to push someone over the edge.
    While most understandably look at this as a senseless and selfish tragedy, if one gives just a bit of thought to the perspective of an injured player who may see the end of his career approaching before it begins, one might understand how they themselves justified their act.
    A professional sports player who is viewed to “have it all” might not think they have value to their family or society aside from their value as an athlete. Their entire life has been devoted to one and only one goal, and when it’s gone, depression is a common response.
    If they are unable to play and support their family, suicide and the resulting life insurance payout might seem to be the best thing they can do for their family (the thinking that, “yes, this will hurt them in the short term, but my life insurance will provide the financial support for them that I cannot”)
    From our perspective, suicide IS an irrational and selfish act… but let’s try to put ourselves in others shoes for a moment before making crass and sarcastic comments…
    Depression is a serious illness – expected to be the 2nd leading cause of disability in the world by 2020 and the 2nd leading cause of death among men McKinley’s age. It doesn’t discriminate by race, religion or income.
    Unless you’d make some callous remark about someone dying of cancer or a physical illness being weak and selfish, I’d suggest refraining from making similar comments about those who died from mental illness.
    Such attitudes are EXACTLY what prevent many from getting treatment and medication to treat mental illness – and these attitudes share a blame in the high number of suicides in this country as well.

  24. Kevat says: Sep 21, 2010 1:52 PM

    I wonder what the Broncos hazing process is like. After watching Hard Knocks and seeing Tebow’s haircut, it clear that the hazing in NFL is either: A. Reaching new heights or B. I’m finally realizing how bad it is. While the haircut/things shown on the show may not be as bad, its obvious that they wouldn’t make the REAL bad hazing public. I wonder if hazing played a part in his suicide.

  25. Cornerdenizen says: Sep 21, 2010 1:56 PM

    @Joe Six Pack:
    Very well said.
    @TMFChiefs:
    While this is an unspeakable tragedy, we don’t know any of they details in McKinley’s life and death.
    But I disagree about suicide being ‘selfish.’
    Selfish people dont take their own lives, they take life from others.
    Surely you, like everyone else here, know miserable people who spend their entire lives inflicting their misery on other people. They purposely punish, attack, and undermine the efforts of people who they think have “had it better” than they have.
    But that’s not the worst part. The worst part is that they think it’s their divine right to do so. That, in my opinion, is the real selfish person.

  26. stiller43 says: Sep 21, 2010 2:00 PM

    # BoltsFan says: September 21, 2010 12:58 PM
    Thank God they’re flying grief counselors in. How in the world did society ever overcome the loss of human life until we discovered the vaunted grief counselors and their caring words of comfort???
    ___________________________________
    Yeah, you’re right. What does anybody need to talk about feelings or emotions for? No one should need grief counselors because they’re all big strong men who don’t need any help with anything. Tell them to suck it up, and get back on the practice field…jackass.
    JoeSixPack,
    Completely agree.

  27. BoltsFan says: Sep 21, 2010 2:15 PM

    @JoeSixPack
    You undoubtedly voted for Obama and hug trees now and then. I never said “counseling” could not benefit someone who needs help and has some serious issues. Nor were those types who my previous “sarcastic” comments were directed at.
    I was addressing this idiotic practice of flying in the “just talk and get it all out” freaks for people who AREN’T contemplating suicide, but were just friends and/or family and/or classmates of someone who has just died. Society has been dealing with death now for, oh, about a million years or so, and we got along just fine without “grief counselors” being trucked in to help survivors “deal with” grief and loss.
    It is pathetic, and somehow this group has convinced the politically correct crowd that their presence is somehow crucial whenever someone passes away.

  28. JoeSixPack says: Sep 21, 2010 3:14 PM

    @ BoltsFan
    Throwing in some political insults assuming someone is a liberal democrat isn’t going to make you look any better.
    Beyond that you’ve made another huge and dangerous assumption that McKinley’s colleagues, on and off the field within the organization AREN’T in need of support themselves.
    Thanks to the stigma of mental illness, most people do what they can to hide their depression and anguish – which if left unaddressed CAN lead to suicide. You can’t tell what’s going on in someone’s head just by looking at them, or even by how they act.
    In fact, those who have actually made the decision to kill themselves will often appear exceptionally bright and cheery, having made their decision, leaving many baffled and feeling guilty as to how they could have “missed” the warning signs.
    The attitude of “we can get along fine without access to counseling” is part of why 30,000 Americans take their own lives each year.
    … and that’s just the number that succeed.
    Many times more than that attempt suicide… and many more times than that contemplate suicide, and many times more than that are impacted by depression and other treatable mental illnesses.
    There’s nothing “politically correct” about this. Conservative businessmen from large and small businesses alike are smart enough to recognize that a very high percentage of sick days and lost productivity result from depression and other behavioral health disorders.
    They know that for every $1 invested in employee support programs they’ll receive between $5 and $15 back in improved productivity and lower sick time.
    Those aren’t liberal Obama supporters – those are wise business owners who recognize a good return on investment when they see it, and recognize that providing accessible affordable outpatient mental health care saves the taxpayers billions of dollars rather than have folks in crisis show up at Emergency Rooms where they cost everyone many times more.
    I’m a conservative – but I worry about many of my fellow conservatives taking a “Fire, Ready, Aim” approach to cutting many programs that people perceived costing more than they save and being championed by bleeding heart liberals.
    There’s wisdom to be found on both sides of the political fence. The opposite is also true.

  29. BoltsFan says: Sep 21, 2010 3:20 PM

    @JoeSixPack
    You undoubtedly voted for Obama and hug trees now and then. I never said “counseling” could not benefit someone who needs help and has some serious issues. Nor were those types who my previous “sarcastic” comments were directed at.
    I was addressing this idiotic practice of flying in the “just talk and get it all out” freaks for people who AREN’T contemplating suicide, but were just friends and/or family and/or classmates of someone who has just died. Society has been dealing with death now for, oh, about a million years or so, and we got along just fine without “grief counselors” being trucked in to help survivors “deal with” grief and loss.
    It is pathetic, and somehow this group has convinced the politically correct crowd that their presence is somehow crucial whenever someone passes away.

  30. BoltsFan says: Sep 21, 2010 3:24 PM

    @JoeSixPack. You may be a conservative. You may also be in the psychoanalytic field. Either way, I don’t believe that most people feel they need to have a “grief counselor” dragged in to help them “understand their feelings” every time something tragic happens. If people are going to blow their brains out because a friend dies, or some such event, they were already psychologically weak. Ever heard of the Darwin theory?

  31. JoeSixPack says: Sep 21, 2010 3:33 PM

    … for what it’s worth
    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 11,773 people died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes in the US in 2008.
    30,000 committed suicide in the US 2008.
    Additionally in 2008 an estimated 8.3 million adults aged 18 or older (3.7 percent of the adult population) had serious thoughts of suicide in the past year, 2.3 million (1.0 percent) made a suicide plan, and 1.1 million (0.5 percent) attempted suicide.
    In other words, there were twice as many actual suicide attempts in 2008 as there were people who died of all forms of cancer combined.
    And yet for some reason this isn’t something we can talk about… and when we do it generates all types of tactless comments that help continue the stigma that will continue to ensure that nearly 3 times as many people die of suicide than drunk driving.

  32. JoeSixPack says: Sep 21, 2010 4:41 PM

    @ Boltsfan
    Avoid the debate team in high school and college
    You’ve just made a perfect case for withholding health care for all who get physically ill with your Darwin reference: Those who get sick are clearly physically weak should be allowed to wither and die. Weed out those kids more prone to cancer or other ailments and let them die before the breed.
    However there is a better alternative:
    1. Stop exacerbating the negative stigmas of mental illness with uninformed opinions
    2. Help people maintain their health – both physically, and mentally – with programs that prevent minor illnesses from becoming major illnesses that cost us all more.
    Not even my fellow conservatives want to send a kid with a broken leg or leukemia home from the hospital to let Darwinism run it’s course. You’re in a class all by yourself.

  33. Cornerdenizen says: Sep 21, 2010 5:15 PM

    “If people are going to blow their brains out because a friend dies, or some such event, they were already psychologically weak. Ever heard of the Darwin theory?”
    Dude. If your desire is to present yourself as a rational, compassionate human being, you should just quit now.

  34. stiller43 says: Sep 21, 2010 5:18 PM

    JoeSixPack,
    Thank you for making BoltsFan look like the complete ignorant jerk he is.

  35. ShaKey says: Sep 21, 2010 6:09 PM

    @ Boltsfan
    Sure hope you never get a job in the military, and/or Veterans Administration. We’ve already got enough self rightious retards as it stands. Also hope you never lose a friend, child, or other family member. In addition, hopefully you or anyone you may care about be fortunate enough to never have depression, bipolar disorder, etc.

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