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Week Five Friday 10-pack

As the new ’68 VW bus rolls toward the train that will roll me to New York, I justify the write off by banging out the weekly Friday 10-pack.

This week, the write off extends to Tuesday, thanks to the Vikings-Jets Monday night game in the New Meadowlands Stadium.

I’ll be joining Paul Allen, Pete Bercich, and Greg Coleman of the Vikings Radio Network for the third quarter of the game, with the goal of being a little less disastrous than Christian Slater on Monday Night Football in 2006.

And so this week’s edition of the Friday 10-pack puts a little extra focus on the Monday night game.


1.  What will Favre do?

When the Vikings’ offense lines up to play the Jets on Monday night, quarterback Brett Favre will face a dilemma.

When Moss takes off down the field, drawing a cornerback from the line and a safety over the top, will Favre choose to try to be on the front end of one of those legendary rainbows that splash down into Randy’s arms, with Moss somehow securing possession even as he’s draped by two or three men — and possibly an official?  Or will Favre check down to one of the guys who’ll be facing single coverage, like Percy Harvin, Visanthe Shiancoe, or Adrian Peterson?

Favre acknowledged the dilemma during his press conference on Thursday.

“I’m like everyone else,” Favre said. “I’m watching the Monday night game, and I’m like, ‘He’s only been thrown to one time?’  So what if he’s covered?  That’s the thing about Randy.  So what if he’s covered?  But does that mean you just throw it to him and you got four other guys that are wide open?  There’s this added pressure.  Maybe it’s just I’m getting old.”

Favre needs to forget about the pressure and just play.  And he needs to defer to the coaches when it comes to distributing the football.  In some cases, it will make sense to chuck it deep, even if Moss is triple-covered.  In other cases, the smart move will be to take what the defense gives Favre.

And that’s why Favre is feeling pressure.  He knows his nature meshes with winging it deep, on pretty much every drive.  And in what apparently will be his final season (unless it isn’t), Favre finally has a guy who reliably will be in position to catch one out of every two or three of those bombs.  

How can Favre resist?  

2.  Revis need to zip it.

Earlier this year, Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis called Randy Moss a slouch.  In Week Two, that slouch blew by Revis and made a one-handed grab for the ages, as Revis was playing the Al Czervik broken arm routine

Now, with Revis still recovering from a Moss-induced hamstring strain that traces to Revis’ August holdout, Revis again is taking shots at Moss, claiming that Randy shut it down in the second half of Pats-Jets game.  Revis even has influenced Antonio Cromartie, who by all appearances held Moss in check on a day Revis couldn’t, to join in the chorus, even though it minimizes Cromartie’s accomplishment from Week Two.  

Revis, who seems like a smart guy, isn’t smart enough.  He should take a cue from Bill Belichick and smother Randy in verbal bouquets.  Few other players find more motivation from external sources than Moss, and Moss will be even more ready to face the Jets, thanks to Revis and Cromartie.

3.  Pats set a dangerous precedent.

The circumstances were familiar.  A disgruntled receiver who wants more money from his current team or a trade to a new one begins to cause trouble, agitating and distracting until he gets what he wants or the whole thing explodes.

Five years ago, the “original 81” took that situation to the extreme, pushing the Eagles to the breaking point and beyond after Terrell Owens’ performance against the Patriots in the Super Bowl prompted Owens to push for a new contract.  The Eagles refused to relent, concerned in part that other players could thereafter try to talk their own way out of town.

With the “other 81” (who is now back to being the “original 84”), the Patriots decided not to dig in their heels, giving Moss what he wanted before the situation involved shirtless situps or press conferences featuring guys saying “next question.”  (OK, the second thing still happened anyway.)

Some will now say that the Patriots have set a dangerous precedent.  And anyone who would say that would be right.  Moss has given any future Patriot who wants a new deal or a trade to a team who’ll give him one a blueprint for getting out.

But here’s the thing.  Moss’ talent level and his accomplishments made the team more likely to relent.  Also, when the Pats acquired him in 2007, the transaction represented at a certain level a deal with the devil.  They knew that, eventually, the Moss who metastasized through the Minnesota and Oakland organizations would return, and they accepted the fact that, when it happens, they’ll deal with it.

Moving forward, the precedent that has been set may not be a problem because the Pats seem to be recommitting to the notion of acquiring only those guys who want to be there.    

4.  Will Cushing be the same?

Though most of the attention in Houston this week centers on receiver Andre Johnson, who’ll be a game-time decision a week after missing a game due to a lingering ankle problem, another player who should be watched carefully going forward is linebacker Brian Cushing, the two-time (literally) 2009 Associated Press defensive rookie of the year.

Cushing returns from a four-game suspension.  Unlike the other high-profile players whose quarter-season banishments have ended (Santonio Holmes of the Jets and Ben Roethlisberger of the Steelers), Cushing’s punishment arose from a violation of the league’s policy regarding performance-enhancing substances.

Assuming, then, that Cushing actually cheated and that his multiple excuses (as the league concluded) hold less water than a fettucini strainer, the question will be whether he can play at the same level without the benefit of the steroids he took before chasing them with hCG in order to kick-start his natural production of testosterone, which shuts down during a steroids cycle.

If Cushing merely used steroids to speed the recovery of an injured knee in order to ensure that he’d be able to play in Week One of his rookie year, he should be able to play as well without them.

Until, of course, he gets injured, and he’s forced to rehab without the use of impermissible chemicals.

5.  Eagles are taking a huge gamble.

When the Eagles travel to San Francisco for a Sunday night game against the desperate and thus dangerous 49ers, they’ll have two quarterbacks:  Kevin Kolb and Mike Kafka.

If Kolb should have his helmet planted into the Candlestick turf like the stump of a used Christmas tree, the rookie from Northwestern will be pressed into service.

And so the Eagles are taking a huge gamble by not having on the roster a veteran with knowledge of and experience in the West Coast offense.  Last year, when Donovan McNabb went down and Kolb stepped up, the Eagles brought back Jeff Garcia in an effort to beef up a depth chart that otherwise included only Mike Vick.  How, then, can the Eagles choose to fly blind with the only alternative to Kolb being an unproven, unaccomplished, and (in comparison to Vick) dramatically less talented first-year player?

6.  Door should be open for Kolb.

The Eagles apparently are willing to assume (or at a minimum hope) that they won’t have to resort to Mike Kafka until Mike Vick returns from a rib/chest injury.  But what if Kevin Kolb plays as well as he did when Donovan McNabb had a rib/chest injury in 2009?

Coach Andy Reid
already has said that Vick remains the starter, something Reid said about Kolb when Kolb was injured.  If Vick was able to alter that status quo, it’s only fair that Kolb should be able to do the same thing.

Though Kolb currently is saying only the right things, Kolb has to be thinking that the door is open.  If he plays incredibly well (admittedly a big “if”, but not impossible), he needs to have a chance to take his job back.

And if Kolb doesn’t get the same consideration Vick received, Kolb will have clear cause to be upset.     

7.  Peppers comes home.

Bears defensive end Julius Peppers returns home on Sunday.  The one-time high-profile Carolina rookie has a simple goal — demolish the Panthers’ current high-profile rookie, quarterback Jimmy Clausen.

Though the Panthers may not win the game, they’ll surely be obsessed with preventing Peppers from having an impact.  They paid him millions, especially in his final season with the team, and he often complained.  At times, he underachieved.  At other times, it seemed that he didn’t give his all on every play.

If coach John Fox has any desire to finish out the season, he’ll find a way to use Peppers’ past words and actions (or inactions) to fire up the troops to give their best possible effort.  With quarterback Jay Cutler out due to a concussion, the Panthers have a chance to pull this one off.

And if the Panthers were to win only one game this year, like they did in the season that put them in position to pick Peppers, they’d likely want the one win to come against Peppers and his new team.

8.  Keep an eye on Kyle Orton.

When the Broncos traded quarterback Jay Cutler to the Bears for a pair of first-round draft picks, quarterback Kyle Orton was tacked onto the deal as an afterthought.

In his second season with the Broncos, Orton is anything but a forgotten man.

Orton currently leads all quarterbacks with 1,419 yards passing, a pace that would shatter Dan Marino’s all-time single-season record.  Though on one hand it’s not surprising given the extent to which the Broncos have tilted their offense toward throwing the ball, the players still need to execute, and no one ever dreamed that Orton would be able to do it.

If he can fire missiles throughout M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday, Orton will move even closer to being regarded as an elite quarterback.

The truth could be that he’s already there.

9.  Colts have no silver lining.

Many league observers assume that the Colts’ slow start (they’re 2-2) represents a major shift from their recent history of 10-0 launches to the season.  The reality, however, is that it’s the second time in three years that the Colts have struggled in September and October.

In 2008, the Colts opened at 1-2 and later slid to 3-4 before catching fire, winning nine in a row.  That year, however, Peyton Manning was hampered in the early going by late-offseason surgery to clean a staph infection out of his knee.

This year, Manning is fine, notwithstanding rumors of lingering nerves problems in his neck.

So if we accept the fact that Manning is firing on all cylinders (and his numbers suggest that he is), the Colts have no reason to think things will get much better as the season unfolds.  It could be, then, that the pack finally is catching up to the Colts, and that the days of 12-or-more-win seasons are done.

At least for 2010.

10.  Uprising of the winless teams?

In one of the most parity-driven seasons since former Commissioner Pete Rozelle decided that seeing the Steelers, Cowboys, and Raiders competing for every Lombardi Trophy, four teams have been unable to navigate the first four weeks of the season with a win.

This week, each of the four winless teams could change the “0” to a “1” in the win column.

In Buffalo, the Bills welcome the up-and-down Jaguars, who probably are feeling a little too good about themselves after pulling off an unlikely win over the Colts.  In Detroit, the close-but-no-cigar Lions could have an exploding stogie in store for the Rams, who probably are feeling a little to good about themselves after winning two games in eight days.  In Charlotte, as mentioned earlier, the Panthers welcome Julius Peppers home, without having to face Jay Cutler.  And in San Francisco, the better-than-their-record Niners get an Eagles team that won’t have Mike Vick.

Don’t be shocked if each of these four 0-4 teams find a way to further prove the parity premise by pushing the bottom of the pack a step closer to the front.

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William Gay is still at corner for the Steelers

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32-year-old cornerback William Gay could be moved to safety or, possibly, released by the Steelers. As noted by Chris Bradford of the Beaver County Times, neither has happened — yet.

Gay continues to be the slot corner for the Steelers, with Artie Burns on the outside. That could change in time, based on the development of Senquez Golson and/or rookie Cameron Sutton.

Gay participated in 80.7 percent of the snaps in 2016 for a team that won the division and nearly got to the Super Bowl. He spent five years with the Steelers (winning Super Bowl XLIII) and one with the Cardinals before returning to Pittsburgh in 2013.

Last year, Gay went from starter to slot corner. He’s due to earn $2 million this year and $1.75 million in 2018.

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Saturday one-liners

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Cowboys RB Alfred Morris is still driving the 1991 Mazda that he bought for $2. (Take that, Vanny Woodhead.)

Is Cris Carter a mentor or an enabler for Giants WR Odell Beckham Jr.?

Eagles DE Brandon Graham is ready to mentor rookie Derek Barnett.

WR Terrelle Pryor Sr. is fitting in nicely in Washington.

The Bears are still searching for their next Devin Hester.

Lions offensive players are getting more comfortable playing Cooterball.

Former Packers TE Mitchell Henry, 24, is battling leukemia.

The Vikings’ top two draft picks remain unsigned due in part to a disagreement over contract language.

The 2017 rookie class in Atlanta has graduated from Falcons University.

The father of Panthers rookie FB Alex Armah hoped Carolina would draft his son, and they did.

The Saints’ cornerbacks are “ready to roll.” (Which is better than being ready to be rolled, again.)

Here are the top 10 photos to come from the first week of Buccaneers OTAs.

Cardinals WR Jaron Brown wants to reward the team for its faith in him.

Commissioner Roger Goodell will speak at a Rams event on June 15; tickets are $550 or $5,000 for a table of 10.

The late Cortez Kennedy had his best season after switching his Seahawks number from 96 to 99 in honor of Jerome Brown.

49ers LB Navorro Bowman is back at full strength and ready to compete in the team’s new defense.

Bills S Joe Powell’s quest to make the roster was aided by a good decision in Tuesday’s OTA practice.

Dolphins QB Ryan Tannehill and WR DeVante Parker are developing great chemistry.

Patriots LB Jonathan Freeny continues to work his way back from a season largely lost to injury.

New Jets OT Kelvin Beachum isn’t healthy enough to participate in OTAs.

Steelers rookie LB T.J. Watt has been taking first-team reps at ROLB, but James Harrison continues to own that spot.

Browns QB DeShone Kizer will spend time between OTAs and training camp working with Tom House, at the suggestion of coach Hue Jackson.

Ravens coach John Harbaugh wants the offensive line to “prove a lot of people wrong.”

The Bengals are breaking in some new linebackers.

Texans DE J.J. Watt approves of the promotion of Mike Vrabel to defensive coordinator.

Former Colts DT Cory Redding allegedly was swindled out of $4.5 million.

Titans WR Rishard Matthews has changed his mind about Colin Kaepernick.

Jaguars WR Allen Hurns hopes to rebound from a season plagued by drops and injuries.

Jon Gruden claims he had no influence over former colleague and current Chiefs coach Andy Reid’s decision to trade up and draft QB Patrick Mahomes.

Raiders WR Amari Cooper is keenly aware of the major dip in production in the second half of each of his first two NFL seasons.

Broncos offensive coordinator Mike McCoy says that rookie receivers Carlos Henderson and Isaiah McKenzie are “swimming” in their effort to pick up the offense. (Which is always better than “sinking.”)

Chris McCain could be the answer for the Chargers at the LEO position in Gus Bradley’s defense.

 

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Cowboys plan “significant” role for Ryan Switzer

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The Cowboys drafted a slot receiver when they already have a slot receiver. But rookie Ryan Switzer won’t simply be the backup to Cole Beasley.

Via Jon Machota of the Dallas Morning News, the Cowboys plan to put both players on the field at the same time.

“He’s a classic slot receiver,” offensive coordinator Scott Linehan said, via Machota. “He has a similar game [to Beasley], but he has his own things. We would really like those two guys to be able to complement each other and run real similar route trees. Certainly a huge bonus with him is his ability to be a returner in our special teams.”

With Beasley taking care of a sore hamstring, Switzer has been getting first-team reps in the slot.

“His role is significant,” Lineman said. “You can see right now he’s getting reps that we wouldn’t have . . . if he wasn’t here. He complements Beasley and also gives us some big-time needed depth at that position.”

Switzer also has big-time skill. Earlier this week, he made a one-handed catch at the sideline and got both feet in before stepping out.

It makes sense to have two slot receivers, beyond depth concerns. There are two slots, and the notion of having Beasley on the inside of one wideout and Switzer on the inside of the other creates fascinating possibilities for the offense, regardless of whether Ezekiel Elliott is lined up in the backfield or Jason Witten is playing tight end.

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Lions add Matt Asiata to running back depth chart

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A month after passing on running backs in the draft, the Lions have decided to add one in free agency.

Former Vikings running back Matt Asiata has agreed to terms with the Lions, who worked him out early this month.

“Anybody knows who has seen him work, he’s a good special-teamer,” Lions coach Jim Caldwell said of Asiata. “He’s tough. He’s a very good pass protector and he carries the ball. He runs behind his pads. He’s always been a very, very effective player in this league.”

Asiata is, along with John Kuhn, one of only two running backs in the NFL who has averaged less than four yards a carry in each of the last five seasons. So it’s safe to say the Lions won’t be counting on Asiata to break many long runs. But as a short yardage back and special teams contributor he may be able to help the Lions. He joins a depth chart in Detroit that also includes Ameer Abdullah, Theo Riddick, Zach Zenner and Dwayne Washington.

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OBJ drops a hint as to his mindset, otherwise remains silent

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Let me begin by saying this: Odell Beckham Jr. has every right to not show up for voluntary workouts. The problem at this point isn’t his absence but his failure to provide any explanation for it.

Often, players stay away in order to exert leverage, with the goal of getting a new contract. Also, and as PFT has recently pointed out, if all players were to band together and boycott voluntary workouts, they’d quickly get a major concession from the league in order to make those mandatory-as-a-practical matter practices truly mandatory. The problem as it relates to Beckham’s decision to treat voluntary-in-name-only workouts as optional is that he has provided no information, directly or via leaks from his representatives to the media, as to the reason(s) for his absence.

Regardless of whether no player must be present, Beckham’s teammates are. As they do things they’d probably prefer not to do but feel like they should do in order to properly prepare for the coming season, it would be useful to at least know why one of their highest-profile teammates believes he doesn’t need to join them. (If any of them had access to Beckham’s reasoning and wanted to knock down the criticism of Beckham, those teammates would be the ones sharing with the public the reason(s) for Beckham’s absence.)

Instead, Beckham has built a mystery, opting to work out with people like Johnny Manziel and Cris Carter in the very same week that OTAs began. The obvious reaction to the timing is why wait until the very week when OTAs began to work out with Manziel and Carter?

Likewise, and as noted here on Friday, Beckham’s decision to engage in workouts and drills away from the team puts his 2017 salary and his fifth-year guaranteed-only-for-an-injury-happening-at-work option a risk. As a result, more than $10 million is riding on Beckham not suffering, for example, a Teddy Bridgewater-style catastrophic knee injury while not on Giants property.

And yet the silence from Beckham as to the reason(s) for his absence continues. Most recently, Beckham has added a twist of defiance and hinted at his mindset, retweeting via his Twitter page messages attacking those who have criticized Beckham for not showing up.

Consider these tweets from Roland Martin that were repeated by Beckham: (1) “If the workouts are VOLUNTARY, then he doesn’t have to show up“; (2) “I’m sick of folks acting like star athletes must always do what a coach asks“; and (3) “When training camp is mandatory, then show up.”

At a time when the Giants have made it clear that they expect Beckham to mature, it’s fair to ask whether Beckham is handling his business in a mature way. Yes, he has every right to stay away. But his stubborn silence has created a vacuum for hot takes, assorted speculation, and ultimately another distraction.

If Beckham were to simply announce his plans and, if he doesn’t plan to show up until the workouts become mandatory, some tangible reason other than “it’s voluntary,” the cottage industry arising from trying to figure out where he is and what he’s doing and why he’s not with the team and whether he’s going to join his teammates will grow. As will the questions for his coach and teammates who are left to explain that which Beckham, for whatever reason, won’t.

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Gronk is “full-go” at OTAs

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With so much time spent this week focusing on players not participating in OTAs, one of the best players in the NFL quietly made a major impact in his return to offseason workouts.

Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski, fresh from signing a new deal that gives him the chance to make up to $5.5 million in extra cash for 2017 with no quo for the quid and less than six months removed from back surgery, was “full-go” during a Thursday workout in the rain, via Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald.

“He looks like Gronk,” offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels said, via Guregian.

Coach Bill Belichick was more circumspect (shocker). “I mean, we’ll see how it goes,” Belichick told reporters regarding Gronkowski. “We’ve only practiced a couple days. We’ve got a long way to go, but we’ll see how it goes.”

Gronkowski also took no drills off, participating in everything the team did. So he’s currently healthy. The real question is whether he can stay healthy.

Gronk has up to $5.5 million riding on it, along with a desire to have a direct hand in achieving what would be the third large ring he places on it.

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Cris Carter explains OBJ’s poor performance in playoffs

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As it turns out, Hall of Fame receiver Cris Carter is serving as something more than a mentor for Odell Beckham Jr. Carter also is acting as a mouthpiece, of sorts.

In his comments to Gary Myers of the New York Daily News regarding Carter’s new role, Carter provides an explanation for Beckham’s subpar-by-far performance in a playoff loss to the Packers. Many believe that Beckham was trying too hard to silence critics who questioned his decision to take a day-off trip to Miami for a boat party as the game approached. Carter says that’s not the case.

“He realized he was too hyped for the game and put too much pressure on himself after he dropped the first pass,” Carter said. “That created anxiety. He didn’t play well. He thought he was going to have a great game against Green Bay and destroy them. He tried to do too much after the first drop and that’s when the anxiety came. . . . What about all the [Giants] who didn’t go to Miami and played like horse manure?”

So, to summarize, Beckham has opted to hang out and/or work out with Carter, Johnny Manziel, and Iggy Azalea in lieu of being with his teammates for the first three days of OTAs, Beckham has provided no explanation for his absence, and Beckham’s new mentor has thrown various teammates under the bus for playing “like horse manure” in the postseason.

Will anyone be surprised if the next step is a leak from a source close to Beckham that the player would like to be traded to a new team?

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Despite disappointing rookie year, Cardinals high on Robert Nkemdiche

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Robert Nkemdiche, the defensive tackle who was the Cardinals’ 2016 first-round draft pick, had a disappointing rookie season: He played in just five games and recorded just one tackle as coach Bruce Arians questioned his work ethic and maturity.

But 2017 is looking different. Cardinals defensive line coach Brentson Buckner said Nkemdiche is looking good in offseason workouts and seems ready to bounce back and show the talent that made him a first-round pick.

I’ve been happy with him,” Buckner added. “I never got down on him. I didn’t expect him to come in and do all that dominating, because I knew the position. It takes time. It takes some guys even longer. He is starting to come around. He’s in great shape. He’s fully back from the ankle. You see the natural ability take over. Now it’s all about Robert.”

Nkemdiche says he didn’t grow frustrated by the coaches’ criticism last year.

“Frustrated means that you’re not aware of the lesson you are being taught,” Nkemdiche said. “I wasn’t frustrated. Of course I think things could have gone differently, but they didn’t. That’s what this world set up for me. Last year wasn’t my year to be ready. So I took a step back, learned from it, and got a better understanding about how to be a professional football player.”

This year, Nkemdiche sounds ready to have the kind of season that won’t leave anyone questioning his work ethic or maturity.

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Saints taking it slow with Hau’oli Kikaha’s third ACL tear

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Saints linebacker Hau’oli Kikaha is a talented pass rusher who showed promise as a rookie when the Saints drafted him in the second round in 2015. But he has bad knees, and for now getting his knees healthy is his highest offseason priority.

Kikaha tore his ACL during offseason workouts a year ago, and he also tore his ACL twice in college at Washington. Saints defensive coordinator Dennis Allen said they’re holding him out of team drills because they want to make sure he’ll be completely healthy when the season starts.

“He’s doing really well. He’s going through some individual drills, he’s taking part in the walk-through,” Allen said. “I think the training staff, I think we’re going to be smart with him.”

Allen said Kikaha, who had four sacks and four forced fumbles in 2015, was off to a good start in the 2016 offseason when he tore his ACL.

“The key is to make sure he’s healthy and ready to go,” Allen said. “Whatever we have to do to have him full go and ready to go through training camp and the season, I think that’s what the plan will be.”

With Kikaha’s history, it’s fair to wonder how long the Saints can expect him to stay healthy. They at least want him to be healthy when the regular season begins.

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Richard Sherman imagined playing for Cowboys, Patriots

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The excellent article from Seth Wickersham of ESPN The Magazine detailing the dysfunction in Seattle includes some news regarding the Richard Sherman trade possibilities. Per Wickersham, Sherman had told friends that he imagined playing for two other teams: The Cowboys and the Patriots.

Sherman hoped that running back Marshawn Lynch would join him in New England. This meshes with the report from former ESPN NFL Insider Ed Werder, a Sherman confidant who reported that Lynch’s options for unretirement consisted of playing for the Raiders or the team to which Sherman was traded.

Wickersham explains that both team and player had grown weary of the drama by the time the draft arrived, and that Sherman the the Seahawks have mended fences. For now.

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Superdome renovations could be coming

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With more and more NFL teams getting bigger and better and fancier stadiums, the Saints could end up renovating their current home of 42 years.

Via Jeff Duncan of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, a $422,000 study has been commissioned to determine potential upgrades to the Superdome. The six-month project will result in a master plan/wish list for ways to make the venue better.

“The whole idea of this was not to wait until the last minute,” Saints president Dennis Lauscha told Duncan. “If we’re going to do this, let’s start now. This project is about trying to get the stadium to the next generation of fans and make it fun for them, as well.”

Possible changes include a “re-imagined front door,” removal of parking garages on the east side of the stadium, installation of field-level boxes, improved terrace seating, incorporation of virtual-reality technology, expansion of the visiting team’s locker room, and renovation of the press box.

The overriding goal will be to extend the useful life of the structure for 15 to 20 years at roughly $1 billion less than it would cost to replace the Superdome. It’s also believed that the changes will help the Superdome get another Super Bowl after swinging and missing in the last two tries to bring the game to New Orleans for the 11th time.

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Brandon Marshall believes there will be no problems with the Giants

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Giants receiver Brandon Marshall recently took the high road in response to withering criticism from former Jets teammate Sheldon Richardson. Meeting with reporters to conclude Marshall’s first week of OTAs with his latest team, Marshall admitted to past problems, but he predicted there will be none with the other New York team.

“[T]he first couple years of my career, more than the first couple years, really the first five years, I wasn’t responsible with the platform that we have,” Marshall said, via Jordan Raanan of ESPN.com. “I’m not a perfect guy, but I worked extremely hard to get in the position I am today. The first couple years of my career was rough, and a lot of it I did myself. I hurt myself. And since that point, once I figured things out, I’ve worked extremely hard to be a better person and work extremely hard to be a better teammate, a better father, a better husband, and I’m proud of where I’m at today.”

Specifically as to his beef with Richardson — or more accurately Richardson’s lingering beef with Marshall, Marshall had nothing to add.

“You know what? That is the third or fourth time we’re going down that path,” Marshall said. “Like I said, it was a tough year for us. In the National Football League, it’s not unique. . . . We had high hopes coming off that first year we were all together in 2015. It kind of blew up in our face. So we all were disappointed.”

Bob Glauber of Newsday recently joined PFT Live to discuss the various dynamics regarding Richardson and Marshall and Marshall and the Giants and plenty of others issues regarding the two New York teams.

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Jets hire Collette Smith as coaching intern

The Jets plan to hire Collette Smith as an intern working with defensive backs during training camp, making her just the third woman to work in a coaching capacity for an NFL team.

“I’m over the top. I’m humbled and I’m proud,” Smith, a lifelong Jets fan, told the New York Daily News. “This could have happened with any NFL team. But it just so happened that it was with my beloved New York Jets. This is bigger because of that. God forbid it would have been with the Patriots. But I still would have done it.”

The 44-year-old Smith played three seasons for the New York Sharks of the Independent Women’s Football League. She spent some time last year observing Jets practices and speaking with head coach Todd Bowles, who was impressed enough from their discussions to offer her a role with the team during camp.

Smith joins Jen Welter, a coaching intern with the Cardinals in 2015, and Kathryn Smith, a quality control coach with the Bills in 2016, as the only women to work on NFL coaching staffs.

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Chiefs announce front office additions

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After a few defections this offseason, the Chiefs have announced some additions to their personnel staff.

The team announced a number of moves, including hiring Chris Shea as the club’s salary cap and legal executive and Tim Terry as director of pro personnel.

Shea was most recently with the Eagles, while Terry joins from the Packers (with General Manager John Dorsey dipping into his background there.

The Chiefs have also promoted Brandt Tilis to director of football administration, named Ryan Poles director of college scouting, Ryne Nutt assistant director of college scouting, Dan Zegers college scouting coordinator, and Jim Noel pro scout. Daniel Ricci has been added as a player personnel assistant.

The Chiefs lost Chris Ballard to the Colts, among other changes.

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Philip Rivers happy with left side of his line

AP

If the Chargers plan to contend in 2017, they need better blocking. They may be on the verge of getting it on the left side of their line.

“[Russell Okung] and [Matt] Slauson there together on that left side have been fun to watch in practice,” River’s told the team’s official website. “I think those two can cause some problems for a defense.  They both really seem to already work well together.  You’ve heard me say I think more than quarterback [and] receiver getting on the same page, it’s those linemen [that’s more important].  So, in the short time that Slauson has been back at left guard and Russell’s been here [it’s been awesome].  They communicate all the time.  They enjoy that part of it. We’ll see how it plays out.”

Rivers is particularly pleased with the arrival of Okung, who joined the Chargers after a year with the Broncos.

“Russell’s been awesome,” Rivers said.  “He’s been what you expect.  I didn’t know him, but I’ve known of him [from] his time in Seattle and last year in Denver. He’s a true pro.”

Slauson slides to left guard after spending his first year with the Chargers at center. If they can stay healthy (which has been an across-the-board problem for the Chargers in recent years), the Chargers could improve enough not only to climb out of the basement of the AFC West but also to get themselves in contention for the postseason.

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