Jags owner tells season-ticket holders there’s “no question” a labor deal will be reached

With the politicians making clear to the NFL and the NFL Players Association their lack of interest in becoming involved in the ongoing labor drama, at least one team is taking the issue to the paying customers.

Given last Sunday’s miraculous, last-second win over the Texans, the paying customers likely will be more inclined to listen.

In an e-mail to Jaguars season-ticket holders, owner Wayne Weaver provides an update as to the CBA situation, with the kind of reasonable language that we wish the two sides would use more often.

“Most of you are aware that the agreement that the NFL has with the players’ union, called the CBA, will expire in March,” Weaver says in a “special message” dated November 17.  “In any such agreement, there are many issues to be discussed, but our negotiations are professional, not personal.  We have immense respect for our players and all who play and have played this game.  No one believes that it is in their interest — the union, the teams, the players, the former players, the fans — for disagreements on these issues to damage the game that all of us love and to which you have given your whole-hearted support and enthusiasm.”

Weaver goes on to express high optimism that a new deal will be negotiated.

“There is no question that an agreement will be reached,” Weaver says.  “However, the more time that goes by before that happens, the more that all of us will lose – players, clubs and fans.  We remain committed to doing all that we can do to reach agreement as soon as we can on a deal that is fair to players, fans and all 32 clubs and provides for the growth and health of the game of football.”

Weaver doesn’t say what the fans will lose, and some may conclude that Weaver is referring indirectly to a work stoppage that would be imposed in a last-ditch effort to get a deal done.

As to the issues between the two sides, Weaver identifies four general concerns.

1.  “The great appeal of the NFL is based on the competition among 32 franchises, each of which must be strong and able to win.”

2.  “To insure [sic] this competition and the safety of our players, the NFL has created the best drug and conduct policies in sports, and has focused on player safety improvements, recognition of our retired veterans and on continuing to create value for our fans.”

3.  “To enhance the value for our fans, we made the proposal that the regular season be increased to 18 games.”

4.  “To address inequities that have evolved under the current system, such as paying untested rookies in a manner that makes no sense, we have proposed shifting money toward proven veterans and retired players.”

Weaver omits the biggest issue — that the league wants the players to take a smaller slice of an ever-growing pie.  That continues to be the biggest sticking point.  Once the money issue is resolved, the rest of the deal should fall together pretty quickly.

Regardless of the issues and when/if they’ll be resolved, it’ll be interesting to see whether other owners begin to get the word out to the folks who buy the tickets — and how the union will respond.

15 responses to “Jags owner tells season-ticket holders there’s “no question” a labor deal will be reached

  1. I am beginning to think that the interest in an 18 game season is only a smokescreen. The league/owners keep talking about it, explaining how it will help the fans, blah blah….. But I think that when it comes down to it, they are going to “give in” and not expand to 18 games, but the concession from them to remain at 16, will be a bargaining chip to get something that they really do want. Not sure what that is exactly, but just a thought…

    It is a similar tactic used by all of the franchises in the draft. For months and months speculation is that “name team” is going to draft “name player”. Then a rival of said team jumps in and “steals” said player in the draft. But in reality, said team had no interest in drafting said player…

  2. He’s only saying that a deal will be done, he doesn’t say by next season. That’s clearly what losses he’s referring to for “players, clubs and fans.”

    This article is meaningless except to say that one owner is positive about them coming to an agreement, someday.

  3. Seriously, Florio? You’re going to “sic” insure vs. ensure?

    Really pompous and…well, unnecessary. It’s an uncommon but perfectly acceptable usage of insure. Lame.

  4. Should be interesting what happens when season ticket suckers send in their money for next season and their is no season. Anyone think they’ll be getting their money back quickly? Kind of hard to trust what’s coming out of ownership these days in any business.

  5. geemoney713 says: Nov 18, 2010 5:33 PM

    He’s only saying that a deal will be done, he doesn’t say by next season. That’s clearly what losses he’s referring to for “players, clubs and fans.”

    This article is meaningless except to say that one owner is positive about them coming to an agreement, someday.
    *********************************************************
    Exactly.

    Taking out “However, the more time that goes by before that happens, the more that all of us will lose – players, clubs and fans” from the headline is very tabloid like.

  6. Too bad the Jaguars will be in L.A. when the labor deal gets done. At least there will be no more blackouts in Wafflehouseville.

    Yes,

    They land of Tom Bodett, can go back to NASCAR and dining at the Bob Evans.

    Yeeeeeeeeeeee Hawwwwwwwwwwww!!

    Los Angeles Jaguars

  7. Why does’nt the NFL just say there is no agreement. Do the players really run the association or would they like to keep the money in their pockets that they pay in dues? It’s really simple if you want to come play football then come play if you don’t want to play and not get paided for it then don’t. Lets be real, only the superstar players can afford not to play and if you think about it has the players association helped get the guys who sat out this year the money they wanted. There is no reason for players who have a contract not to play and try telling the rookies next year not to get paided because of a cancer(union that leeches cash from them) I would like to see a piece written on the union, how much the players pay in, and what they due for them.

  8. There will be a season. If these players won’t play, then there is a couple million more who will. No problem for ticket holders.

  9. More “Happy Talk” from another owner. A deal will get done but when? I’m not going to worry about it. The fans won’t lose anything rather they will have more spending money if there is a lockout or stoppage of any kind.

    The National Fine League is addressing the health of retired players because their getting dragged through court and losing. And what about a 17 game season? That makes more sense all the way around. Yes, the NFL gave up too much money to the players. A tough fight ahead.

    So who is the spin for? Are the owners whistling past the graveyard?

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!