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NFL stresses immediate consequences of possible lockout

NFL headquarters

The NFL hosted ten reporters at the league’s Park Avenue offices Thursday morning, with the express effort of stressing the financial consequences of a potential lockout.

Since Florio is in West Virginia getting ready for his bus trek to Dallas, I sat in at the grown-up’s table to see what I could learn.  [Editor’s note:  Who knew they had booster seats at the league offices?]

We’ll be posting more detailed stories throughout the day from the 90-minute session, but here’s a quick recap of some of the main points hit:

1. By the league’s estimate, 569 players will be affected in March by a lockout.   Of those, 495 players are scheduled to be free agents in 2011, with the assumption that the league goes back to a system where four accrued seasons are needed to become a free agent.  That number includes 170 starters and 70 Pro Bowl players.

It will be the biggest free-agent class ever, and it will have the highest percentage of starters available ever.

They also counted 74 players with roster or option bonuses due in March, which have a total of $143.5 million due to those players.

2. The NFL said the league already is beginning to see the labor uncertainty affect their bottom line in some deals with sponsors.   The league believes $120 million in revenue will be lost by March of 2011 without a deal.   By August, the number climbs to $350 million.

The league estimated the clubs and its players will lose up to $1 billion if the CBA is reached just prior to the regular season, which is  money the league claims it won’t get back right away.  The league believes they would lose $400 million in revenue per-week during the regular season.

3.  The league compared the so-called “lockout insurance” clauses in the TV contracts to a home equity line of credit.

“Whatever we collect, we have to repay with interest in the event of missed games,” NFL chief negotiator Jeff Pash said.

4. The remainder of the session essentially consisted of an explanation from the league’s side as to why the NFL believes the current model doesn’t work.

“The current economic model does not promote a healthy future for the game,” Pash said.

This is where the finances got complicated.  We’ll dive into this more later.   (We know you can’t wait.)

5.  The league expects the franchise tag to be in use for clubs this year in February, just as it has been in previous seasons.

6.  No round-the-clock intensive meetings are currently scheduled.

7.  The league said they understood the “obligation” to fans of the game, reiterating their awareness of the fact that the league enjoys its popularity because of the fans.

“With no agreement, we will have failed the fans,” Pash said.

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49 Responses to “NFL stresses immediate consequences of possible lockout”
  1. giablommi says: Jan 27, 2011 2:03 PM

    Get your popcorn ready and start finding a hobby or two to get you through football-less Sundays next fall.

  2. dvnelson72 says: Jan 27, 2011 2:05 PM

    wow. could the league have had enough foresight to require 5 accrued seasons the year before the CBA expires just to double the number of impacted free agents?

    If so, bravo. That is some mad scientist thinking.

  3. arnoldziffel says: Jan 27, 2011 2:10 PM

    Just out of curiosity … wouldn’t the negotiations go a little smoother if the NFL clubs would just open their books?

    Any particular reason why they should not??

  4. alanschech says: Jan 27, 2011 2:24 PM

    If you are aware of the obligation to the fans, then stop publishing facts that we don’t care about, or we aren’t smart enough to understand. I know when they get into the complex finances I don’t really get it, but frankly I don’t care.

    Billionaires arguing with billionaires over a few bucks. Stop talking and let’s do it. I won’t use the language of Antonio Cromartie but he is right. Enough talk. Just sit down and work it out.

  5. stanklepoot says: Jan 27, 2011 2:25 PM

    3. The television contracts were compared to a home equity line of credit.

    “Whatever we collect, we have to repay with interest in the event of missed games,” NFL chief negotiator Jeff Pash said.
    _____________________________
    This is certainly not 100% accurate. The money they get from Fox, CBS, and ESPN they have to repay (assuming that the NFL can’t use these networks’ desire to renew their contracts with the NFL to convince them to partially forgive this debt…perhaps just the interest owed). The $1 billion that the NFL gets from DirectTV for the exclusive rights to the NFL Sunday ticket package the NFL keeps, whether any games are played or not. They will not be required to pay back a single penny of that money.

  6. bigperm33 says: Jan 27, 2011 2:25 PM

    I wish the league would shut up. I wish the players and the players union would shut up. Get a deal done. You are running and taking part in the most popular sport by far. It is beyond insincere to say a current model doesn’t work – find some middle ground, and get it done. Until then, stop trying to get the fans on either side. If there is a lockout, we will hate both sides. Stop with the gimmicks, stop with the whining, and the crying, and our side has it so bad, blah, blah blah. Just get the deal done. It’s that simple.

  7. hatesycophants says: Jan 27, 2011 2:26 PM

    @giablowurself,

    Did you not actually read this post? Neither side is dumb enough to risk the loss of the numbers divulged here. Did ya notice that the league and clubs have a lot more to lose than the players collectively? It will likely hurt players more individually, but any business person who says he’s willing to have to pay back with interest $400 million a week (and that’s just during the regular season) is an idiot. No one wins with a lockout or a strike.

    You people eagerly anticipating a work stoppage, as your post indicates, are the worst kind of fans. I suspect you’re also the worst kind of people.

  8. packattack1967 says: Jan 27, 2011 2:35 PM

    Just out of curiosity … wouldn’t the negotiations go a little smoother if the NFL clubs would just open their books?

    Any particular reason why they should not??

    Except for the Packers, they are privately held businesses. This isn’t nazi Germany or the USSR.

  9. laeaglefan says: Jan 27, 2011 2:44 PM

    Reply to footballisking:

    The fans are NOT on the players side OR the owners side. The fans are on the side of starting the 2011 season on schedule, without having to spend months of holding our breath, waiting for daily updates from the media on what’s going on with the negotiations. The fact that we are even subjected to this nonsense of a bunch of millionaires arguing about their slice of the millions is sickening. If anything, the fans should form a union and go on strike. That would teach all of those jackasses on both sides a good lesson!

  10. yourcommentsux says: Jan 27, 2011 2:49 PM

    As we approach the expiration of the current agreement, one would expect the two sides to meet more. I would hope that at the conclusion of the superbowl (go packers), these two sides will be sitting down daily for the rest of February until the deal is done. If they don’t quite posturing and sit their asses down and talk nothing is going to get done. Do fans really care enough to pick a side? I feel sorry for neither side but obviously you need a viable economic model for long term stability. So do some tweeking and get back to work!

  11. berniemadoffsides says: Jan 27, 2011 2:50 PM

    It’ll get fixed in the 11th hour.

    A statue of Goodell will be erected in Canton. Ticker tape parades will ensue in the Canyon of Heroes. Four horsemen will walk the Earth and… sorry, I’ve… I’ve said too much.

  12. purplehayseuss says: Jan 27, 2011 2:50 PM

    arnoldziffel,

    The NFL is a private entity, and not beholden to anyone in terms of allowing viewing of their financials. Each team, save the Holy Packers, are also private entities, and therefore not obligated to allow anyone to see their finances, either.

    The NFL is a for-profit business, and it succeeds very well in making money. Note the potential loss of $400 MILLION each WEEK that NFL games are not played….that is not chump change, my friend. Therefore, the NFL is posturing with it’s adversaries now, and will continue to do so until, in my opinion, the very last moment before serious financial bleeding begins.

    Negotiations will proceed as smoothly as the parties want them to proceed. These negotiators are professionals and will not bat an eye at risking the weekly paychecks of NFL players when their masters’ demands are in play. This means the owners, the league, the players union, and others have dogs in this fight, and this fight will not just ‘end’ until someone blinks.

    And don’t you dare feel sorry for the players. These men live lives equal to about the top 15% of all humans on earth, and if their chosen leaders fail to keep their weekly pay flowing, then they have chosen badly in their leaders. There is no requirement that the players leave college before they graduate, nor that they spend their ridiculous incomes on obscene lifestyles. They are to blame if they assume that because they are who they are and they do what they do that the very earth will not shift under them and alter everything. Which may indeed come to pass.

  13. southridge23 says: Jan 27, 2011 2:56 PM

    arnoldziffel says: Jan 27, 2011 2:10 PM

    Just out of curiosity … wouldn’t the negotiations go a little smoother if the NFL clubs would just open their books?

    Any particular reason why they should not??

    ======================================

    Because each team is a privately owned franchise and the last thing the owner of a franchise should feel obligated to do is open his books to “prove” his numbers.

    It’s bad enough unions have businesses by the balls (see teachers & auto-workers unions)…being forced to show your profits is nobody elses business then the person(s) who laid down the money and risk in owning their own organizations.

  14. lichnor says: Jan 27, 2011 2:56 PM

    87% of players are free agents this coming year? Almost 9 out of every 10 players’ contracts expire?

    That can’t be right.

  15. rammer411 says: Jan 27, 2011 2:57 PM

    If the NFL season is cancelled suicide rates in men between 18-45 are expected to triple.

  16. knucklebucket says: Jan 27, 2011 2:58 PM

    All I read was blah, blah, blah….greed….blah,blah,blah, we have millions of dollars and you don’t……blah,blah,blah, we want more millions of dollars and don’t want anyone to take a portion of our millions of dollars, blah,blah,blah……

    All I want is to be able to watch football on Sundays this fall after a long work week. Get it done you greedy bastards.

  17. coastiejoe says: Jan 27, 2011 3:01 PM

    How about this for an idea…

    How about – knowing that “it” was going to expire in 2011, the same year “it” was set to expire 20-something years ago when “it” went into effect – you don’t wait until 2 months before “it” is set to expire the try and iron “it” out

    Piss Poor Planning

    ps – see Antonio Cromartie article to find out what “it” is all about

  18. riverhorsey says: Jan 27, 2011 3:01 PM

    495 players out of 569 scheduled to be free agents.

    anyone else think the owners planned it that way?

    those boys won’t be sitting out very long if they have to get a real job to live.

  19. manning10g says: Jan 27, 2011 3:04 PM

    Players are the only real contributors in this game.
    The owners are just trying to rip off employees as usual.
    What is funny is that this is an employee-business for lack of a better word. Players should absolutely get the Most.
    Don’t be afraid of losing a season if it leads to an improved game.

  20. dolphinphan says: Jan 27, 2011 3:06 PM

    please reach a compromise. i dont want to miss chad henne throwing away games for the dolphins next year

  21. FoozieGrooler says: Jan 27, 2011 3:11 PM

    “The current economic model does not promote enough cash for the owners,” Pash said.

    / fixed

  22. harrisonhits2 says: Jan 27, 2011 3:20 PM

    “It’s bad enough unions have businesses by the balls (see teachers & auto-workers unions)…”

    @southridge23,

    Oh please. The people who have business “by the balls” are the scumbag ceos and board of directors who rape these companies of their wealth and pay themselves obscene salaries, and get their golden parachute mega packages after running the companies into the ground.

  23. daback9 says: Jan 27, 2011 3:23 PM

    I can’t believe what I’m reading in these posts..
    Everyday Joes whinning over the fact that a multi billion $ entertainment business and its employees are about to shoot themselves in the foot because they can’t agree on how to split the spoils of that cash cow they hold in their hands.

    I say let them blow it, would be a damn good business opportunity for someone else to move in to pick up the pieces. Isn’t the free enterprise system great!!

  24. vadog says: Jan 27, 2011 3:24 PM

    Teams are claiming that they are “losing” money. Precedence has already been set in the court system, I believe, forcing private businesses to open up their books. Back in the ’90’s MLB was claiming that teams were losing money, and small markets would lose their teams through contraction. The players sued to see the books and won. The owners were lying. No contractions occurred, a lockout was averted, and their has been labor peace ever since.

  25. lonespeed says: Jan 27, 2011 3:32 PM

    Neither side is fooling anyone.

    Winner? Those equally greedy bastards who run the BCS.

    I can only hope that fans have the self-control to stay away when the NFL ramps up their ‘we loved you all along’ and ‘this agreement is better for everyone involved, most of all the fans’ PR campaign.

  26. jc1958coo says: Jan 27, 2011 3:34 PM

    lock em out i’m done just like baseball!! haven’t watched or went in 20yrs!!!!!!!!!

  27. jamie54 says: Jan 27, 2011 3:40 PM

    purplehayseuss, you are the man! Nails, baby! Anyone who doesn’t like it, well, let’s see your paycheck, how about you asking your employer how much money they make, open up THEIR books. Owner owe it to NO ONE to open up their books. Why? Privacy acts, first amendment and all that. What, you don’t like it? Get a life, there’s lots going on in the world other than football.

  28. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 3:55 PM

    @ arnoldziffel

    No one is saying that the owners HAVE to show their books, but we’re thinking that if their profit margins are actually thin (which is HIGHLY doubtful considering the health / wealth of the league), than they should show us that to help their argument.

    The fact that they don’t leads us to believe that the profit margins are not actually that thin.

    Without the players, the NFL and its owners have nothing. Give players what they want, re-structure the rookie pay scale to re-coup some of the money, and lets get on with the show!

  29. jasoncnz says: Jan 27, 2011 3:57 PM

    Jason Whitlock is SO RIGHT about how this will go down. If a lock-out lasts until August then the NFL will lose $350 million total? That is a paultry $11 million per team! Compare that to 35% of the players who are free agents and who were expecting to get their multi-million dollar signing bonuses in March. And the 5% of players who were expecting to get their multi-million dollar roster bonuses in March. And the additional 5% of players making the league minimum who were expecting to get their perfomance bonuses (which can be as much as their entire saleries) in March. This is going to be a BLOOD BATH!!!

    Players may make millions of dollars a year, but most of them are just like us in that they live up to their means. In other words, If I make $50,000 a year, I’m going to live a $50,000 lifestyle. If I make $150,000, then I’ll upgrade my lifestyle by that amount, and so on. The bottom line is that the majority of people, whether you make $150,000 a year or a $3 mil a year, live month to month. So when March comes and all those players dont get the $$ that they’ve been counting on getting, they are going to be in Big Big Trouble. Guys literally wont be able to pay their bills. And it’s not just a few guys mind you. 45% of the players in the league were planning on a big payday that isnt coming!

    As a FAN, just watching from afar as if it were a big game of chess, the owners have stradigized this thing brilliantly! They will end up getting Everything They Want and then some! By the end of April (at the latest) the players will be screaming “UNCLE” as load as they can!

  30. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 4:10 PM

    purplehayseuss says:
    “And don’t you dare feel sorry for the players….”

    If playing professional football was that easy, then why are you not doing it? Why aren’t I doing it? They work and practice their craft for most of their entire lives. They put their bodies through extreme rigor, and dedicate themselves fully to their work. Often, these men come from underprivileged homes and overcome tremendous odds to be able to play in the NFL. How many players work their entire lives just to make a practice roster, or find themselves playing in Canada? Then, after they retire, they must deal with a body that is completely worn out, that is if they are lucky enough not to be disabled in some way by an injury during their career.

    If I am a business owner, I keep my workers happy, otherwise they leave and my profit is gone. The NFL owners aren’t keeping their players happy and are paying the consequences.

  31. southridge23 says: Jan 27, 2011 4:42 PM

    harrisonhits2 says: Jan 27, 2011 3:20 PM

    Oh please. The people who have business “by the balls” are the scumbag ceos and board of directors who rape these companies of their wealth and pay themselves obscene salaries, and get their golden parachute mega packages after running the companies into the ground.

    =========================================

    first off, ceo’s and b.o.d’s taking parachutes takes place in PUBLICLY owned companies with 10,000+ shareholders who are affected by decisions made at the top. Each nfl team is a PRIVATELY owned entity sometimes by as little as one person…so let’s get business 101 down. There are no b.o.d’s or parachutes…it took private investment (some of it at least) to acquire their teams, they weren’t just handed their respective franchises.

    If you own a mcdonald’s franchise, you are the only owner and you wanna pay $7/hr to someone to flip burgers while you sip martinis in vegas that’s your decision to do so and no one else should tell you otherwise.

  32. broncsfan says: Jan 27, 2011 5:02 PM

    I’ll die laughing if, as one last F You to the powers that be in the NFL, Al Davis breaks ranks, and the Raiders are the only team that holds practices.

  33. 1seriously1 says: Jan 27, 2011 5:08 PM

    manning10g says: Jan 27, 2011 3:04 PM

    Players are the only real contributors in this game.
    The owners are just trying to rip off employees as usual.
    What is funny is that this is an employee-business for lack of a better word. Players should absolutely get the Most.
    Don’t be afraid of losing a season if it leads to an improved game.

    ————————-

    You can make this statement about any corporation. The employees do the work, management does their job, owners of the companies do their job, but get the bigger take. Why? Well, they own the damned company! Sam Walton wasn’t a cashier, he sat in his “owners chair” raking it in while all the folks working in the stores made minimum wage. Hell, Wal-Mart still makes a killing, yet the majority of their employees qualify for welfare. The NFL is a BUSINESS, just like Wal Mart, Microsoft, Target, etc…

    I don’t feel bad for the players. Not one bit. The ticket booth person, the folks that clean up the stadium after the crowd is gone, security at the stadiums, the field crew, etc… Those are the people I feel bad for. Why shouldn’t everyone that is involved with the NFL, other than the owners, get a bigger piece of the pie? Not just the players.

  34. FinFan68 says: Jan 27, 2011 5:11 PM

    @sirbenly,
    The question remains what constitutes keeping your workers happy vs. maintaining a solid business. If it costs you your business just so they can be “happy” would it be worth it? The bottom line is simple. THESE players could leave at any time. Nobody is forcing them to sign a contract for hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars. The players will ultimately come to realize is that will ALL be replaced eventually and the fans will come to cheer their replacements. Players retire, get cut, get injured every day on an individual basis and NO NFL roster has remained unchanged from year to year. It simply boils down to how many are replaced at the same time. The league can survive without THESE players but these players can’t survive without the league.

  35. ontboltfan says: Jan 27, 2011 5:20 PM

    harrisonhits2 says:

    Oh please. The people who have business “by the balls” are the scumbag ceos and board of directors who rape these companies of their wealth and pay themselves obscene salaries, and get their golden parachute mega packages after running the companies into the ground.
    ———
    The same scumbags that direct deposit your pay cheque every week.

    Unions aren’t needed. What do you think HR is for? If the co is no good people wont work there and you are free to work anywhere if you aren’t happy.

  36. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 5:29 PM

    “If you own a mcdonald’s franchise, you are the only owner and you wanna pay $7/hr to someone to flip burgers while you sip martinis in vegas that’s your decision to do so and no one else should tell you otherwise.”

    =====================================

    … and that can work out quite nicely, unless your burger-flippers are the best in the world – leaps and bounds ahead of all others (in keeping with your comparison between NFL athletes and burger-flippers), and they leave you for another burger restaurant.

  37. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 5:33 PM

    @Fin Fan68

    You are completely wrong. The reason the NFL is so successful is because of the talent level. TRUST ME. I live in Canada and am stuck with seeing Blue Bomber games. Watching those guys play is brutal – makes the game terrible. All that needs to happen is a new league to be created, promising all current players and college players better pay and better conditions, and there you have it – a new and better league than what the NFL can compete with.

  38. mvp43 says: Jan 27, 2011 5:35 PM

    Cromartie must be shaking in his boots………I hope he’s saving his lunch money!

  39. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 5:38 PM

    The reason the NFL is so successful is because of the talent level. TRUST ME. I live in Canada and am stuck with seeing Blue Bomber games. Watching those guys play is brutal – makes the game terrible. All that needs to happen is a new league to be created, promising all current players and college players better pay and better conditions, and there you have it – a new and better league than what the NFL can compete with.

  40. goforthanddie says: Jan 27, 2011 5:50 PM

    3. The league compared the so-called “lockout insurance” clauses in the TV contracts to a home equity line of credit.

    “Whatever we collect, we have to repay with interest in the event of missed games,” NFL chief negotiator Jeff Pash said.

    In other words, they get paid, invest the cash, and end up losing nothing/making a (small?) profit anyway. That’s not incentive for owners to settle this quickly.

  41. sirbenly says: Jan 27, 2011 5:56 PM

    One final word.

    A couple of years ago, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the CFL had the chance to have Onterrio Smith on the team and the whole city was buzzing for weeks. ONTERRIO SMITH! If even two current NFL starters came to Winnipeg to play for the Bombers, I would buy season tickets, and the place would sell out every game, no problem.

  42. gpete1962 says: Jan 27, 2011 6:45 PM

    I don’t fell sorry for the players or the owners.

    I hope all the owners who have implemented these high priced PSL’s for their new stadiums take a Rodney King type beaten in their wallets.

    And as for the players, what union do you know of that any good worker could make 25 million in 5 years.

    they all have a serious disconnect from reality.

  43. purplehayseuss says: Jan 27, 2011 7:08 PM

    sirbenly,

    I played football in college. Did you? My statement expresses my opinion about the insane money being generated each week by professional football. The owners are asking for a bigger piece of that huge pie, and their cut is already large. The players, whom give of their very bodies in pursuit of their goals and in making their living, through their representation in a union, are asking for a larger cut of the huge pie because, hey, ‘we suffer after we retire, our bodies are broken and used up’.

    Each of us makes choices in our livelihood. Some of us put in many years of education and take the responsibility of paying for it. Others don’t get educated and live in their chosen lifestyles based on earning ability which often comes from education.

    My intent above was not to take a side. Each side has admirable qualities and those not so admirable. I have no intention whatsoever of apologizing for hyperwealthy sports team owners or their ‘plight’. These owners have no ‘plight’ whatsoever relative to the lives led by the vast majority of fans, whom pay for the entire NFL to exist. But as above, the players whom are able to make choices with money that neither you nor I could never, ever make, are similarly culpable for this quandary. I don’t call them greedy, and if I have to take a side, I’ll side quickly with the players, no doubt.

    But your assurance that ‘most/many players come from disadvantaged backgrounds’ is absurd. Some do, and when they make it big, their stories make great copy and/or films. But many college athletes are NOT disadvantaged. They come from all walks of life and social/economic backgrounds. Don’t pout that the players in the NFL are somehow deserving lives of luxury and excess because you think they come from the projects as a rule. They don’t. You can point out the “Blindside”-type players all day long and I’ll reply with the Mannings and Bradys right back. And don’t dare start me on Reggie Bush. My favorite line from a commercial is with an athlete on camera with an angry look on his face and a growl in his voice, upset at having to spend so much money, saying “Do you know how much it costs to insure a Lamborghini?”

    Face it, buddy, we the fans are the ones that ‘suffer’ because we give our money to these private businesses in exchange for entertainment, period. The rest of the whole shebang is a product of OUR money. They will all lose because if there are no games, no TV, no ads, no beer sales, no hot babes cheering to get us riled up, no pizzas delivered Sunday afternoons, no backstory on the latest hot-button issue on the ESPN radio shows, nothing. If WE don’t PAY, this all goes AWAY.

    Get it?

  44. radrntn says: Jan 27, 2011 7:46 PM

    thats classic… the tv clause is like a home equity line of credit…so in others words get ready for the notice of default, because the nfl did a stated income loan with the Tv exec’s.put nothing down on the house, and then get a H.E.L.O.C. , so they get a bunch of cash from their zero down, buy a bmw or 2, and the winnabego with the yacht. Then sya they are broke, and don’t make any payments.

    Who knows maybe the NFL owners will get lucky and the govermant will use federal taxpayers money and will bail them out and let them apply for tarp money, and all the owners can fly to bermuda for a meeting on the taxpayers dime…..gotta love it

  45. FinFan68 says: Jan 27, 2011 8:04 PM

    sirbenly says:
    Jan 27, 2011 5:33 PM
    @Fin Fan68

    You are completely wrong. The reason the NFL is so successful is because of the talent level. TRUST ME. I live in Canada and am stuck with seeing Blue Bomber games. Watching those guys play is brutal – makes the game terrible. All that needs to happen is a new league to be created, promising all current players and college players better pay and better conditions, and there you have it – a new and better league than what the NFL can compete with.
    ==================
    Think about that for a little longer than a split-second. If you honestly believe there is a possibility that another league can sprout up and offer better pay than the worst offer the NFL chooses I can’t help you understand this any better. The UFL still has not paid the players all monies owed for this past year and the average is only $50,000. The MINIMUM for NFL players is over $300,000…the median is between $700,000 and $800,000…and those numbers do not include the signing bonus

  46. realitypolice says: Jan 27, 2011 8:07 PM

    southridge23 says:

    Because each team is a privately owned franchise and the last thing the owner of a franchise should feel obligated to do is open his books to “prove” his numbers.

    It’s bad enough unions have businesses by the balls (see teachers & auto-workers unions)…being forced to show your profits is nobody elses business then the person(s) who laid down the money and risk in owning their own organizations.
    ========================

    Wrong.

    As a pro-business member of the Libertarian Party, I would agree with you 99% of the time.

    However, the league forfeited the right to keep it’s books closed when it chose to negotiate a CBA with the players that included a clause tying player salaries to revenues.

    Would you agree to a contract with your employer that tied your salary to company revenues and then allow the company to keep their revenues secret?

  47. palinforpresidentofnorthkorea says: Jan 27, 2011 8:10 PM

    Settle this or:

    De versus GODell in a steel cage match to the death!

    Fans get football.

    Fans get to see two lawyers bare their teeth and fight.

    Fans get rid one at least one of these jerks.

    It’s all good!

  48. sirbenly says: Jan 28, 2011 8:30 AM

    @purplehayseuss:

    I apologize, perhaps I was not making myself entirely clear.

    First, all I’m saying is that the NFL owners should (not must, but should) open their books if they are strapped for cash because that would help them win negotiations. (realitypolice makes a good point above, as well)

    Second, I didn’t say that MOST NFL players are from broken homes, I said often that is the case – just like any other profession, you are correct. My point was that its not like the NFL can just find new players with no problem because of the elite nature /dedication of the current players.

    Third, the NFL needs its talent. The NFL exists BECAUSE of its talent. I’m not taking sides, I’m just stating facts. And just like any industry or business, the owners need to keep their workers happy to survive. It’s business 101. Perhaps that’s why many unions are so powerful.

  49. pftequalsgreatjournalism says: Jan 29, 2011 11:37 AM

    Great discussion but it’s really simple – the players need to get paid and will cave in when their money stops coming in…

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