Skip to content

Greg McElroy gets a 48 on the Wonderlic

Film Five Most AP

If that SEC thing doesn’t work out for Alabama, the Tide perhaps can roll to the Ivy League.

Clarence E. Hill, Jr. of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that quarterback Greg McElroy racked up a 48 on the Wonderlic test.  The highest possible score is 50.

Usually, the results of the test are closely guarded by the league.  But the leaks usually relate to low scores.  When a guy aces the test, the player and/or his agent will be far more likely to get the word out on their own.

That said, scoring too high can be as much of a problem as scoring too low.  Football coaches want to command the locker room.  Being smarter than the individual players makes that easier.  Having a guy in the locker room who may be smarter than every member of the coaching staff can be viewed as a problem — or at a minimum as a threat to the egos of the men who hope to be able when necessary to outsmart the players, especially when trying in some way to manipulate them.

So while McElroy, who was unable to work out due to injury, may be really smart, he perhaps would have been wise to tank a few of the answers.

UPDATE:  And a debate already has emerged regarding the accuracy of the reported number.  Along with a debate regarding whether it’s a bad thing to get a high score.  The only guy who got a perfect score thinks it hurt him.

Permalink 45 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Rumor Mill, Sprint Football Live - Rumors, Top Stories
45 Responses to “Greg McElroy gets a 48 on the Wonderlic”
  1. chapnastier says: Feb 28, 2011 9:26 AM

    Wait so we are supposed to believe that a player should aim for an average score somewhere in the middle? That logic doesn’t make any sense. Peyton Manning has always been smarter than any coach on the Colts yet I’d rather have him than any other QB in the league. Sometimes these random insights have no sense or logic to them.

  2. carolinethedog says: Feb 28, 2011 9:29 AM

    Green-bow, Al-a-BAMA!

  3. tunescribe says: Feb 28, 2011 9:30 AM

    I highly doubt that scoring well on the test can be considered a potential “problem” to the coaching staff. Where did you come up with that? A player can be super intelligent and still loyal to authority.

  4. psuphinphan says: Feb 28, 2011 9:30 AM

    I understand your position, but it’s foolish to think that a team will view McElroy’s intelligence as a problem. It’s actually a huge bonus to know that he can pick up your system & offense relatively easily, especially if the offseason camps, etc. are going to be minimized.

  5. dewalt2990 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:31 AM

    …or you want as many smart guys on your team as possible…

  6. jw731 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:31 AM

    This is the most ridiculous premise I think I have ever heard. Why wouldn’t coaches want smarter players to make their job easier? Or it could speak to the fact that the premise was deduced by someone who has never been in a locker room.

  7. FoozieGrooler says: Feb 28, 2011 9:31 AM

    “Having a guy in the locker room who may be smarter than every member of the coaching staff can be viewed as a problem”

    Careful, your “lawyer” is showing.

  8. whatswiththehate says: Feb 28, 2011 9:32 AM

    I guess this is a moment when being “smart” should have trumpeted being intelligent…And YES there is a difference.

  9. crabboil says: Feb 28, 2011 9:34 AM

    Alabama is the most dominant team in the SEC. look at their stats. i think the “SEC thing” is working out for them…

  10. 12strikes says: Feb 28, 2011 9:36 AM

    Just a no win situation.

    Get a QB that scored average or below average and pay him for 2 or 3 years to “learn the sytem” the whole time in the Not For Long league the coach is sweating out if he gets to keep his job.

    Get a QB that is SMART, maybe get him playing right a way or in a year and be affraid that the QB is going to run the show.

    How is a coach suppose to think?

  11. r8rsfan says: Feb 28, 2011 9:36 AM

    Come on. If a coach isn’t smart enough to do the job then he should find another line of work. NEVER, at any point in this kids life has he been encouraged to finish in the middle. The QB is arguably the most intellectual position on the field. There’s a big difference between intelligence and insubordination.

  12. johnnyb216 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:36 AM

    He will be a packer.

  13. medialovesthecowboys says: Feb 28, 2011 9:38 AM

    “So while McElroy, who was unable to work out due to injury, may be really smart, he perhaps would have been wise to tank a few of the answers.”

    ——————————————————

    Uhhh….no. You go to the Combine with the intent to perform at your highest level if I’m not mistaken. Tanking answers, cause a few Coaches may not have adequate enough PEN FIFTEENS to feel confident in the locker room around “smart” players, is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard.

  14. wawa33 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:39 AM

    Cam Newton’s comments:

    “Cam is jealous of Greg…Cam needs 250k to take the Wunderlic again. Cam is an icon. Cam will score hire than JaMeatloaf.”

  15. CKL says: Feb 28, 2011 9:43 AM

    A bigger
    “problem” as far as authority would look to be the best “employees” (players) out earning the “bosses” (HCs) which doesn’t happen much in the real world.
    I don’t hear many HCs bitching about how much players make or vice versa. If they can overcome that, I think someone having a great wonderlic isn’t that big of a deal authority wise. Besides they can be very smart but not have the football IQ of a great OC, HC, DC etc. anyway. Truly intelligent people recognize and respect others’ knowledge.

  16. ecuamerican says: Feb 28, 2011 9:49 AM

    I don’t like to use the the terms “clown” or “fraud” but you sir, are without a doubt both: the classic “clownfraud”.

    I’ll let these commenters, with probably too much Wunderlics in them, tear your logic apart.

  17. dryzzt23 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:52 AM

    Ok so if a player is smartthat’s a problem?

    A smart player knows not to do stupid off-the -field activities so as to maximize his earnings potential and NFL longevity

    I have yet to see Vince Young do anything worthy of note in the NFL and he scored a 9 or 10

    yet the media talking heads would fall all over themselves hyping VY than doing the smart thing and taking McElroy

    McElroy can learn to read NFL defenses
    VY has been in the NFL for several years and still cannot read a DEF

  18. luckynumberlucas says: Feb 28, 2011 9:53 AM

    The Wonderlic is pathetic.

    My classmates and I did the test 2 years ago and almost everyone scored in the mid to high 40ies.

    4 guys even scored a perfect score.

    Maybe it’s tough for Americans who attended public schools, but for private school grads or Europeans it is as easy as it gets.

  19. oldbyrd says: Feb 28, 2011 9:59 AM

    HO HUM WHO CARES?

  20. stlducks says: Feb 28, 2011 10:00 AM

    Or if you only had smart players who were respectful without the egos you can control the locker room so stop drafting troublemakers….cam…fairley…

  21. majikalmushr0om says: Feb 28, 2011 10:05 AM

    “That said, scoring too high can be as much of a problem as scoring too low. Football coaches want to command the locker room. Being smarter than the individual players makes that easier. Having a guy in the locker room who may be smarter than every member of the coaching staff can be viewed as a problem ”

    Wow, thinking outside the box a little too much on this one… clearly your wonderlic score would give a head coach some job security.

  22. sprizzle2182 says: Feb 28, 2011 10:11 AM

    any coach who doesn’t want a player bc he’s “too smart” isn’t worth playing for…good for Greg for doing so well!!!

  23. FoozieGrooler says: Feb 28, 2011 10:12 AM

    wawa33 says: Feb 28, 2011 9:39 AM

    “Cam will score hire than JaMeatloaf.”

    ..and apparently, both would score “hire” than you. ;)

  24. jhorton83 says: Feb 28, 2011 10:19 AM

    I really don’t think anyone in the locker room gives a crap what a player scored on their Wonderlic.

  25. rcunningham says: Feb 28, 2011 10:25 AM

    Dan Marino got a 13. Yeah.

  26. ihateannouncers says: Feb 28, 2011 10:29 AM

    Are you seriously teling us that a player should be worried about scoring TOO high?? Can you get one coach or draft day analyst who would agree with that statement??? Might as well state that coaches don’t want players who are faster / stronger / better football players than they are. C’MON Mike…

  27. skippynj says: Feb 28, 2011 10:30 AM

    My old girlfriend used to score 100 every time we conducted the wonderlick test so does that mean she’s twice as smart as McElroy?

  28. wawa33 says: Feb 28, 2011 10:33 AM

    FoozieGrooler-

    The word “hire” for “higher” was intentional using Cam in 3rd person. to show he would be less intelligent than JaMeatloaf. What community college did you flunk out of?

  29. phinfan says: Feb 28, 2011 10:51 AM

    Hair pie!

  30. mwasko78 says: Feb 28, 2011 10:53 AM

    “He will be a packer.”

    I agree to agree. Exactly the type of player TT and MM look for. They will turn him into a 2nd or 3rd rounder. Just like they will do with Flynn. Good to see GB back to their old ways in picking a QB late, developing them, and trading them for higher picks.

    GO PACK!!!

  31. jc1958cool says: Feb 28, 2011 11:00 AM

    maybe the guy can read a defense, or playbook!
    cam newton will say DAH i have to talk to my daddy!

  32. all4patriots says: Feb 28, 2011 11:02 AM

    What a stupid argument…..only BAD coaches are worried about having players that are too smart.

  33. moelester says: Feb 28, 2011 11:04 AM

    Yea..coaches dont want players with intelligence. If you think about it its true. If you were a head coach would you want a guy like Peyton Manning as your QB? I didn’t think so!

  34. dan7800 says: Feb 28, 2011 11:06 AM

    That said, scoring too high can be as much of a problem as scoring too low. Football coaches want to command the locker room. Being smarter than the individual players makes that easier.

    Huh? Whoever said “I wish my team’s quarterback was dumber?” What coach would ever actually wish the same thing?

    This is what passes for journalism these days?

  35. burntorangehorn says: Feb 28, 2011 11:08 AM

    Extremely high intelligence can actually be a liability in some employment situations, but QB of a professional football team is not one of those situations. What a ridiculous notion.

    However, the OP presumes that the Wonderlic measures intelligence. That is not correct. It measures problem-solving aptitude, and does not require skills above what one is supposed to have learned at the secondary (high school) level.

  36. tinbender2000 says: Feb 28, 2011 11:11 AM

    I worked at a dealership where the FOM (fixed operations mgr.) ran the show. He fired anyone he suspected of being smarter than himself, including me. The place went bankrupt within two years. That kind of thinking would have the same results for a football team.

  37. burntorangehorn says: Feb 28, 2011 11:11 AM

    dryzzt23 says:
    Feb 28, 2011 9:52 AM
    Ok so if a player is smartthat’s a problem?

    A smart player knows not to do stupid off-the -field activities so as to maximize his earnings potential and NFL longevity

    I have yet to see Vince Young do anything worthy of note in the NFL and he scored a 9 or 10
    ======================
    First of all, VY has won a lot of games and has been a Pro Bowler, so you’re just not watching TV.

    Second of all, he had an agent who didn’t arrange for Wonderlic prep, which is something every agent worth a damn is supposed to do.

    Third of all, his original attempt was incorrectly administered. This reportedly involved a proctor who tried to hold a conversation with him about the Rose Bowl during the 12min. VY was supposed to be taking the exam.

  38. mike83ri says: Feb 28, 2011 11:13 AM

    What did Rolle get on this last year?

  39. universalcynic says: Feb 28, 2011 11:21 AM

    [i]Having a guy in the locker room who may be smarter than every member of the coaching staff can be viewed as a problem — or at a minimum as a threat to the egos of the men who hope to be able when necessary to outsmart the players, especially when trying in some way to manipulate them.[/i]-MF

    [i]And to back up such a statement I offer up not one ounce of proof. [/i]

    Nice job Mike. Real nice.

  40. spartyfi says: Feb 28, 2011 11:32 AM

    I had to take a wonderlic a few years back for a job I applied for…unfortunately, I scored high on it and it was part of the reason they found me to be “over qualified”. Literally, the guy said “you should have flubbed that test a little”. So, I can see the theory behind scoring too high being a negative…but I find it to be an insanely ignorant theory!

  41. commentcentral says: Feb 28, 2011 12:15 PM

    How did Saban control this maniac at Alabama!

  42. BernardPollardIsAnAss says: Feb 28, 2011 12:19 PM

    “That said, scoring too high can be as much of a problem as scoring too low. Football coaches want to command the locker room. Being smarter than the individual players makes that easier. Having a guy in the locker room who may be smarter than every member of the coaching staff can be viewed as a problem — or at a minimum as a threat to the egos of the men who hope to be able when necessary to outsmart the players, especially when trying in some way to manipulate them.”

    This isn’t a problem as long as you have a genius of a coach like Belichick running things. Hail Hoodie!

  43. electstat says: Feb 28, 2011 12:54 PM

    burntorangehorn says:
    Feb 28, 2011 11:11 AM
    dryzzt23 says:
    Feb 28, 2011 9:52 AM
    ======================
    First of all, VY has won a lot of games and has been a Pro Bowler, so you’re just not watching TV.

    Second of all, he had an agent who didn’t arrange for Wonderlic prep, which is something every agent worth a damn is supposed to do.

    Third of all, his original attempt was incorrectly administered. This reportedly involved a proctor who tried to hold a conversation with him about the Rose Bowl during the 12min. VY was supposed to be taking the exam.

    ___________________________

    If I remember correctly, that score of 9 was on his retest. He scored even lower his first time. The fact is that he has done nothing to discredit the low score that he received. He won a few games, yes. But what has that gotten the Titans? Were those games enough to warrant his high draft pick and high wage. I’d say not.

  44. sdchargers25 says: Feb 28, 2011 1:03 PM

    ….well McElroy WAS a Rhodes Scholar finalist….

  45. E. Forrest Christian says: Mar 1, 2011 10:53 AM

    Great call, Mike. There’s a lot of research that shows that bosses don’t want someone who can think more complexly than they do because, like you said, the team will look to him for leadership. I think most people don’t get how big a difference this shows between McElroy and the average QB, who is usually pretty smart. He’s probably screwed.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!