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More owners head home after labor committee meets

Jerry Jones, Robert Kraft, Roger Goodell, John Mara

First the shortest NFL owner’s meeting ever broke up, leaving only the ten-member labor committee in the D.C. area to continue to talk.

Roughly an hour later, many of those owners are headed home.

Steelers owner Art Rooney told NFL Network that he and other owners from the labor committee are leaving town.  Other reports say that Patriots owner Robert Kraft and Cowboys owner Jerry Jones have left.

It’s uncertain when mediation will continue at this point and if any owners will be in the room.   There was almost no ownership involvement in the mediated talks before Wednesday, and apparently there won’t be many owners present on the final talks before the current CBA agreement runs out in roughly 28 hours.

(Unless, of course, we get an extension to all this fun.)

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16 Responses to “More owners head home after labor committee meets”
  1. pappysarcasm says: Mar 2, 2011 7:50 PM

    Doty blew the thing up! Lockout is coming for sure now…the gloves are coming off!

  2. RocksRocksRocks says: Mar 2, 2011 7:51 PM

    Ugggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

  3. 1972wasalongtimeago says: Mar 2, 2011 8:10 PM

    Idiots. All of them.

  4. FoozieGrooler says: Mar 2, 2011 8:11 PM

    There will be an extension.
    What other choice do they have, besides settling (which I’m not counting on)?

    Both sides must at least be aware that whoever pulls the trigger, whether it be a lockout or a strike, will appear to the public as the bad guy here.

  5. buffordtjustice says: Mar 2, 2011 8:20 PM

    Thats a Bad sign!

  6. kegowhisky says: Mar 2, 2011 8:36 PM

    This lack of and fleeting owner participation just seals what I should have already realized – the owners have every intent of locking out and nothing is going to change that. We’re all screwed.

  7. 4gotten12 says: Mar 2, 2011 8:45 PM

    Winning? Losing? Winning?
    Charlie Sheen

  8. jleimer says: Mar 2, 2011 8:50 PM

    I still think a lockout will happen but when it will happen is up to the owners.

  9. rezen73 says: Mar 2, 2011 9:04 PM

    Millionaires vs. Billionaires.

    I wouldn’t care, except for the fact that public funds pay for most of the billionaires’ playgrounds.

    Personally, the moment that the NFL (or any entity thereof) accepted public funds for any purpose whatsoever (e.g. a stadium), the NFL (and all entities thereof) agreed to a pact with the public(s) that provided said funds to you know, perform said services.

    I’m kind of curious. How many stadiums in the league were wholly funded by the NFL owners, and how many include any sort of public financing?

    From my perspective, I don’t side with the owners or players… I side with the taxpaying public that has funded these giant playgrounds.

    Give us football, or pay us back!
    Give us football, or pay us back!
    Give us football, or pay us back!
    (with interest, due immediately).

  10. sakatak says: Mar 2, 2011 9:17 PM

    If there is a lockout the fans have to take all necessary steps to get this issue resolved. We can start with protests at every stadium, (if you have to call in sick to protest I will write you a doctor’s excuse). We may have to physically get all the owners and union negotiators together by force, lock them in a room and get these issues resolved.
    This is America, we can do it. We can not fail the system that is failing us. We must not talk about boycotts, because lets face it we all love the NFL. This is way bigger than any other labor negotiations in the history of the world. This sight gives us a format to help solve this, we need ideas. HELP

  11. rezen73 says: Mar 2, 2011 9:38 PM

    sakatak wrote:If there is a lockout the fans have to take all necessary steps to get this issue resolved. We can start with protests at every stadium, (if you have to call in sick to protest I will write you a doctor’s excuse). We may have to physically get all the owners and union negotiators together by force, lock them in a room and get these issues resolved.
    This is America, we can do it. We can not fail the system that is failing us. We must not talk about boycotts, because lets face it we all love the NFL. This is way bigger than any other labor negotiations in the history of the world. This sight gives us a format to help solve this, we need ideas. HELP

    As we all know, during negotiations, one side or the other has to apply leverage to get what they want. In this case, the fans want a deal to be completed. So the fans need to apply some leverage.

    How does the common fan generate leverage? Obviously, by boycotting games… however games aren’t due to be played for several more months, so how can we generate leverage NOW? By not renewing season tickets, threatening to sue the league if/when a lockout occurs and games are missed, particularly in cities where stadiums were partially funded with taxpayer monies, and most importantly by boycotting any and all avenues for the NFL to make money directly or indirectly, specifically TV revenue streams. When sports comes on your local channel and talks about the NFL… change the channel. Don’t visit NFL.com or any team related websites. (I’d say don’t visit this site, but that would be counterproductive! lol). Don’t watch any pre-draft shows on ESPN or any other networks. Do anything and everything you possibly can to reduce the citizen footprint of the NFL during the lockout.

    Unless and until both the owners and players see that a lockout/strike/work stoppage/impasse/whatever the hell you want to call it that takes football away from the fans/ will cause more damage than the money they can possibly get by imposing a lockout/strike/work stoppage/impasse/whatever the hell you want to call it/, they’ll entwine themselves into a bitter battle and in the end, the fans will lose. Kind of like when we watched Aliens vs. Predator. No matter who wins, the fans lose.

  12. mrcowpatty says: Mar 2, 2011 9:49 PM

    To those that are addicted to the NFL, you need help. If you can’t find something better to do then sit in front of your big screen TV in the fall and winter to watch pro football your life is pretty sad. Any body need another beer?

  13. Rhode Island Patriots Fan says: Mar 2, 2011 9:53 PM

    It’s becoming increasingly clear that the NFL owners gave away the candy store to the players during the 2006 CBA negotiation. I’m reminded of Galatians 6:7-8: “…for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.” Rather than being critical of U.S. District Court Judge David Doty, the owners should be critical of themselves for signing a contract which, from their perspective, was not a good business model.

  14. canadianvikingfaniii says: Mar 2, 2011 10:28 PM

    None of them really care about the fans. This is depressing…

  15. mick730 says: Mar 2, 2011 11:06 PM

    Who is it exactly that is supposed to “care” for the fans? And what does this caring entail exactly? Should the NFL owners continue to operate under a losing CBA that eventually leads to the insolvency of a great many of their franchises to show their “care” for the fans?

    On the players side, are they supposed to take a reduction in their pay to demonstrate their “care” for the fans?

    Get a grip. The NFL is a business. If the teams cannot generate an acceptable rate of return on their investment, they will act accordingly, which is what they are doing in their attempt to change the CBA.

    Here’s something to ponder for some of you folks. The Packers today released AJ Hawk. Why? Because he was scheduled to make $10.5 million dollars during the coming season. A guaranteed 10.5 million bucks.

    Now the team as a whole, the Green Bay Packer franchise, only made 9 million dollars in 2009. So one guy, one guy out of a 53 man regular roster, plus the 7 man practice squad, plus a number of players pulling in a full salary on injured reserve, was scheduled to make more than the organization made. In one season. One guy. One guy who isn’t even one of the higher paid players. What is Peyton Manning looking for in his new deal? Something like 23 million dollars a year. Michael Vick just inked a deal to earn him over 16 million dollars this coming season.

    The point is that there are a great many players on the different NFL teams who make more in one season than their employer does. Not just a few, but many.

    It isn’t just that the player make more than their employers that is the key point, but rather that most franchises are probably experiencing the same deterioration in profitability that the Packers are experiencing.

    You guys want your football and you don’t care about the money. Fine, but you are being unrealistic. If the owners cannot earn a decent return, they won’t stay in the business and the game will suffer.

    A new CBA has to be agreed to; one that is fair to both sides. If it isn’t, the only teams in the league who will be able to operate are the teams owned by billionaires for which football is a hobby. You know, the same billionaires you all hate so much.

  16. montymontana15 says: Mar 3, 2011 7:50 AM

    Can’t we all just get a long, Rodney King. Where are Tom Landry and Vince Lombardi when you need them. For all of you football fans born after 1975, you missed the golden age of sports. Baseball was good , kids collected baseball cards (now they collect asian crap, pokeman, no offense to asian fans) football was played the way it was suppose to be, diva free and HARD, non of this pass interference crap if you sneeze when trying to defend the ball, basketball has Lew Alcindor, UCLA had John Wooden and there were no STRIKES or GREEDY owners or ME first players. Beer was a dollar, and gas was under a dollar. Now you see what America has become, GREED killed us in 2007 because we had banks and financial institiutions giving free money to people who cant even wipe their asses, and as for our sports systems, its all about GREED, Me First Lebron and Basketball, Baseball still has the smell of steriods, and now Football or should I say NO FOOTBALL because of GREED on both sides. As John Madden said, its good its all good everyone is making money but no its not ENOUGH money, Jerry has to pay his ego with that Giant toilet in Dallas. I agree with the guy that said we paid for these public playgrounds either give us football or pay us for the use of OUR Stadiums. Green Bay may not be big, but they had the right idea all along. The town owns the team AND the stadium, no problems there, if they dont play football they dissolve the team and give the money and assesets to the people of Green Bay….just like they ought to in 31 other cities. A team that is worth a billion dollars is not enough for all these clowns. Someone ought to flush their big ass egos down the toilet.

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