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Doping expert calls it “comical” for players to oppose HGH testing

With NFL owners planning to insist that any new labor deal include an agreement to test players’ blood for use of human growth hormone, one doping expert says it’s ridiculous that players would oppose HGH tests.

I’d be very disappointed if the NFL does not get in lock with the rest of the world — and this goes for baseball as well — and employ blood testing,” performance-enhancing drug expert Dr. Gary Wadler told Alex Marvez of FOXSports.com.

The biggest impediment to HGH testing has always been that HGH — unlike anabolic steroids — cannot be detected in a urine test. Football players (and many athletes in other sports) have objected to having blood drawn for HGH testing.

But Wadler said there’s no reason for players to oppose getting blood drawn.

“Any concerns the athletes have of a needle,” Wadler said, “it’s almost comical to think a 300-pound athlete is afraid of a little needle prick.”

If the players strongly oppose HGH testing because drawing blood is too invasive, they need to clearly articulate why. It won’t play well with the public to have the owners supporting a crackdown on performance-enhancing drugs, and the players opposing testing.

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56 Responses to “Doping expert calls it “comical” for players to oppose HGH testing”
  1. Slackmo says: Mar 26, 2011 1:55 PM

    It’s in the players’ best interest that they are not in an environment where they are forced to take HGH in order to stay competitive.

  2. chicosmith says: Mar 26, 2011 1:56 PM

    Players lose ground in the court of public opinion by the day. I hope the NFL pulls a Ronny Reagan and fires them all. They will soon appreciate what slave labor really is.

  3. scudbot says: Mar 26, 2011 1:57 PM

    Can’t wait to see what D’Maurice has to say about this being invasive and a violation of rights as he demands 10 years of financial data that includes non-football operations.

  4. hobartbaker says: Mar 26, 2011 1:58 PM

    LOL, the boys will change to the “retro” look. As in looking like a bunch of bank tellers and grocery clerks the way they did back in the day. Grow out the Afros and the Fu Manchus!

  5. dryzzt23 says: Mar 26, 2011 1:58 PM

    Really the player object? But are these not the SAME players that demand TRANSPARENCY from the owners and demand that the owners open their books for all to see?

    Come on, these players expect to have things every way they want. I, for one, am tired of it

  6. kelvinmchale says: Mar 26, 2011 2:00 PM

    Maybe getting the performance and size enhancing drugs out of the game will make guys smaller and slower, thus reducing the number of serious injuries to their knees, muscles and brains. I also wonder who is paying attention to these same issues at the college level. Or do college players not suffer concussions?

  7. dbellina says: Mar 26, 2011 2:02 PM

    Even if there isn’t a lockout, with HGH testing, half the league will be suspended anyways.

  8. elrushbo2 says: Mar 26, 2011 2:03 PM

    The NFLPA* plans on using HGH testing as a bargaining chip give away. I doubt they would oppose testing for HGH since it’s in the players best interest….. if they did that would just be plain ignorant…..oh wait nevermind

  9. sdboltaction says: Mar 26, 2011 2:05 PM

    They should go through Marine Corps boot camp… I disliked needles until they herded us through sickbay like cattle poking us like a mad man performing accupuncture… gimme a break!

  10. vicktator says: Mar 26, 2011 2:13 PM

    Well this doping expert isn’t a negotiating expert. As much as I hate all of these negotiations, the players aren’t going to give the owners this for nothing. They will agree to blood tests in exchange for something in the new CBA. I think this is definitely a leverage move, not players being afraid of a needle prick.

  11. pondbridge says: Mar 26, 2011 2:14 PM

    Wadler said, “it’s almost comical to think a 300-pound athlete is afraid of a little needle prick.”

    Your assignment:

    Make up your own joke using some but not all of Wadler’s words.

  12. 3octaveFart says: Mar 26, 2011 2:16 PM

    “..there’s no reason for players to oppose getting blood drawn.”

    Much like there’s no reason for owner’s not to open the books.

    For either side to oppose simply means they’re hiding something. Not much difference.

  13. help me says: Mar 26, 2011 2:29 PM

    Not only “comical’ but an insult to our intelligence for players to mkae excuses as to why they don’t want HGH testing.

    Their are ZERO excuses, players.

  14. FinFan68 says: Mar 26, 2011 2:35 PM

    The players aren’t opposed to the method of testing; they are opposed to getting caught.

  15. WingT says: Mar 26, 2011 2:36 PM

    I’d like to see blood drawn from some of the owners as well

  16. numberonewiseone says: Mar 26, 2011 2:39 PM

    Let these guys roid it up! It would make it more fun to watch and make it less of a challege to enforce the rules. Everyone would be on the same level and our favorite players who get injured would be back on the field much faster!

  17. henryjones20 says: Mar 26, 2011 2:44 PM

    lance armstrong and mark mcguire r still laughin while barry bonds goes on trial 4 this!! and all u fans r still furius at bonds i suppose. haha what a world

  18. mashoaf says: Mar 26, 2011 2:49 PM

    The league already draws blood, so the players should not complain. Remember when Brian Cushing got busted for roids. They drew blood because he tested positive for HCG which is only produced in pregnant women and people with serious medical concerns. So its a moot point that the players don’t want to get poked with a needle. Anyhow a lot of them are already poking themselves with needles.

  19. sudzy11 says: Mar 26, 2011 2:57 PM

    It may be inevitable that HGH testing gets approved by the NFL but I don’t need some buffoon associated with WADA saying something is comical. WADA is a militant organization that engages in witch hunts to “preserve the purity of athletics”. I am sure that Dick Pound will go his grave yelling “we’re going to get you Lance”.

  20. footballisking says: Mar 26, 2011 3:02 PM

    it’s almost comical to think a 300-pound athlete is afraid of a little needle prick.”

    Mr Wadler is crazy those needles arent “little”…I am with the players no way on gods green earth I am signing up to being stabbed with that massive object

  21. berniemadoffsides says: Mar 26, 2011 3:06 PM

    Over 80% of NFL players use PED’s. It’s impossible for 250 lb men to run 4.5′s and bench 500 lbs naturally. It’s an absolute joke that this hasn’t gotten the same coverage that MLB has. Why do you think that is? Because almost EVERYONE takes steroids/HGH in the NFL.

  22. cromags says: Mar 26, 2011 3:08 PM

    I thought the doping expert was going to be Romanowski.

  23. footballfan292 says: Mar 26, 2011 3:08 PM

    They dont want testing because they know just maybe Earnest Graham of the Bucs was 100% correct when he said in an interview that 1/3rd of the players use HGH.

  24. zoxitic says: Mar 26, 2011 3:13 PM

    I agree. I’m sure the players meet with alot of little pricks in the NFL.

  25. johnnyb216 says: Mar 26, 2011 3:19 PM

    They’re getting to big for their britches. If they can’t agree to hgh testing, it is an admission of guilt. I hope these players choke on their money since there is obviously something wrong with the way they have been bargaining. What a sham.

  26. dustinpatrik says: Mar 26, 2011 3:25 PM

    yep. its pretty comical

  27. micronin127 says: Mar 26, 2011 3:50 PM

    A blood test is not invasive. It’s the standard for the Olympics and nearly all international sports. It is far more accurate.

    How many players pee in front of the person collecting the sample and how many go into a stall and use a whizzinator?

    Drug testing in football and baseball is a joke and clearly shows that neither sport is serious about fair play.

    Baseball would suffer the most because the juicers hit the 500 yard bombs and the power pitchers need the HGH to go again 5 days later.

    Football wouldn’t suffer as much from getting steroids and HGH out of the game. There would still be someone faster and stronger even if both players were clean as it is much more about team play as well as individual battles in football. Someone would still be better than their opponent and there would still be scoring.

    There would probably be fewer injuries if players weren’t on PEDs in football as well. It would be the best thing they could do for player safety as the effects of steroid use and all these drugs are not well known, but certainly can’t be without a cost later in life.

  28. brambo67 says: Mar 26, 2011 4:07 PM

    3octaveFart says: Mar 26, 2011 2:16 PM

    “..there’s no reason for players to oppose getting blood drawn.”

    Much like there’s no reason for owner’s not to open the books.

    For either side to oppose simply means they’re hiding something. Not much difference.

    __________________________________________

    More and more owners each passing week will open their books.

    Those that won’t like JJ or Synder (and the Glazers, Bidwells and Browns) won’t do it because they pay themselves hige sums.

    Now, what is different from CEOs getting paid $15m+ a year?

    Plus, the most obvious reason is that the NFLPA* want to bargain in terms of total NFL revenue.

    That is plainly ridiculous.
    If you are a fan of 22 of the 32 teams, the existing increases of the salary cap via the recently defunct CBA was having a negative effect on the team you support.

    Any salary cap should be based upon an average revenue income for teams – and that aerage would be best as the MEDIAN revenue.

    And I keep reading that HGH is not unsafe – how do we know that?
    There has NOT BEEN LONG ENOUGH exposure to the longer-term effects of continued HGH use.

    Ask yourself this: how do we know that HGH doesn’t effect the brain in any way, thus leading to an increase in concussion effects, or concussion symptom effects?

    We just don’t. Because HGH is essentially illegal, so you cannot do the tests, nor has it been in the system long enough to have enough test subjects to do all the necessary experiments on.

  29. brambo67 says: Mar 26, 2011 4:17 PM

    berniemadoffsides says: Mar 26, 2011 3:06 PM

    Over 80% of NFL players use PED’s. It’s impossible for 250 lb men to run 4.5′s and bench 500 lbs naturally. It’s an absolute joke that this hasn’t gotten the same coverage that MLB has. Why do you think that is? Because almost EVERYONE takes steroids/HGH in the NFL.

    ________________________________________________

    And simple Physics tells you that an onject of mass 250lbs hits with more momentum that an object moving at the same velocity that has a mass of 230lbs. Add in the effect that the 250lbs man is now running faster than the former player than weighed 230lbs and you get more injuries.

    If the players did actually care about cutting down on injuries they would want HGH banned.

    Plus, the game would not suffer. The game was as interesting in the 1970s and 1980s as far as running plays and defense as it is now. The only difference is that guys were smaller.

    It would not effect the interest in the league. The offenses in the league are mainly aerial, so the receivers don’t need to be bigger if the DBs aren’t. And the OL doesn’t have to be as big if the DL isn’t as big.

    I’d like to see cheats out of the league.

  30. devrocks247 says: Mar 26, 2011 4:49 PM

    I’d much rather get stuck with a needle than have someone stare at me while I pee.

  31. zackd2 says: Mar 26, 2011 4:56 PM

    “I hope the NFL pulls a Ronny Reagan and fires them all.”

    So then NFL talent would be that of the UFL? Yeah, great f’ing idiot you moron

  32. raynman49 says: Mar 26, 2011 5:23 PM

    Comical. I have hemochromatosis, and have had well over 300 pints of blood taken out of me. And that’s no small needle! Don’t tell me you monsters can’t handle a blood test needle. Wimps! It’s just an excuse!

  33. Gary says: Mar 26, 2011 5:30 PM

    When a baseball player takes a PED, he’s the moral equivalent of a child molester to the fans and media. When a football player does the same, the only outrage is about the loss of playing time due to the suspension. The fans and the media are never morally offended when it’s a football player.

  34. thumper00 says: Mar 26, 2011 5:39 PM

    After reading post here for awile it sure looks like the posts for the players ARE THE PLAYERS,they seem to know a little more info.
    If so i just want to say, you are replaceable
    it may take 2-3 years but fresh new players will
    make the game back to were it was.
    I for one can live a year without football to get you big ego primadonnas out of this game.
    You have god given talent others don’t have
    but others with as much or more will relace you……….NFL reorganize and dump them ALL.

  35. Deb says: Mar 26, 2011 6:25 PM

    @chicosmith …

    What goes around comes around. Maybe you’ll get screwed by the economy and find out what slave labor is. Sounds like it couldn’t happen to a more deserving guy.

  36. Deb says: Mar 26, 2011 6:34 PM

    Just love all the moralizing here. If players are doping, it’s because they’re constantly being pushed to run faster, jump higher, hit harder, and so on … at the behest of fans and owners. Most of you have no idea the kind of pressures on pro athletes and the kind of damage their bodies suffer over the course of their careers.

    Sure, if there’s a reliable test that would make life safer for them and ensure a level playing field for them, I’d be all for it. I don’t give a damn what the billionaires who hold their contracts or the beer-bellied big-mouths yapping on this site think. Most of you would probably gut a coworker with a letter-opener for an extra 10 cents an hour so stop judging players who are desperately trying to keep up in a brutally competitive business.

  37. thefiesty1 says: Mar 26, 2011 6:42 PM

    The players don’t like randomly peeing in a bottle, their not going to like drawing blood either. It’s like the folks stopped for suspicion of DUI on no refusal weekends here. They don’t like it either, but they have NO choice.

  38. childressrulz says: Mar 26, 2011 6:57 PM

    needles suck i wouldnt submit to blood tests ever for anything. Besides I have no problem with NFL players using HGH or steroids for that matter. If it was allowed it wouldn’t be a problem to try and test for it.

  39. clivus63 says: Mar 26, 2011 7:04 PM

    In my opinion(just mine mind you):

    Testosterone and HGH should be over the counter.

  40. roscoepcoaltrain86 says: Mar 26, 2011 7:37 PM

    Watch the movie/documentary “BIGGER,STRONGER, FASTER” and many of you will change your mind about steroids and HGH. you can’t test for peptides either and they are not illegal under federal law yet. They are the new frontier of steroids. You heard it here first.

  41. 3octaveFart says: Mar 26, 2011 7:39 PM

    Gary says: Mar 26, 2011 5:30 PM

    “When a baseball player takes a PED, he’s the moral equivalent of a child molester… ”

    Getting a little carried away aren’t ya?

    That’s like the posters here yesterday calling players communists and terrorists. Wow.

    Perspective is slipping away, fast.

  42. canteatgreens says: Mar 26, 2011 7:41 PM

    *********************************
    devrocks247 says:
    Mar 26, 2011 4:49 PM
    I’d much rather get stuck with a needle than have someone stare t me while I pee.
    *********************************

    I wouldn’t be able to pee. Stage fright.

  43. FinFan68 says: Mar 26, 2011 8:45 PM

    Deb says:
    Mar 26, 2011 6:34 PM
    “Just love all the moralizing here. If players are doping, it’s because they’re constantly being pushed to run faster, jump higher, hit harder, and so on … at the behest of fans and owners.”

    Yep, it must be everybody else’s fault. That’s the typical mindset of many of the players. It can’t possibly be their fault. No personal responsibility, just act like a victim.

    “Most of you have no idea the kind of pressures on pro athletes and the kind of damage their bodies suffer over the course of their careers.”

    Stop being so elitist, Deb. You are no smarter, no more informed, and no more influential than many of the posters on this site. You just seem to think you are.

    “I don’t give a damn what the billionaires who hold their contracts or the beer-bellied big-mouths yapping on this site think.”

    Umm…yes, you do. You, more than most, respond to anything remotely critical of your viewpoint. I don’t know if it is a need to get in the last word or if you truly think you can educate the lesser minds who don’t share your point of view. If you didn’t care, you wouldn’t feel compelled to refute everything.

    “Most of you would probably gut a coworker with a letter-opener for an extra 10 cents an hour so stop judging players who are desperately trying to keep up in a brutally competitive business.”

    This statement is comical, hypocritical and downright fantasy rather than reality. You chastise those who you deem to be judging others while in the same sentence you make the most ridiculous of judgments and comparisons. You also try to justify wrongful actions by some players with a ridiculous excuse of just trying to keep up in a competitive businesss. No, they are trying to cheat the game and the people who subsidize, play and watch it. You support those who are willing to cheat or skirt the rules in order to gain an edge, yet that is the very issue you take umbrage with when it comes to the owners. Is that willful hypocriticism on your part or just blind loyalty?

  44. southridge23 says: Mar 26, 2011 9:23 PM

    brilliant marketing move on behalf of the owners! you mean to tell me they JUST thought, “Oh yea by the way, we want drug testing”?

    This is a genius ploy of leverage by the owners to hit the players while they’re already down in the court of public opinion.

    The players oppose, which the owners knew would happen all along…checkmate!

  45. mikea311 says: Mar 26, 2011 9:45 PM

    smart move, if the players aren’t as strong and as fast they get to pay them less.

  46. Deb says: Mar 26, 2011 10:32 PM

    @FinFan68 …

    Well, aren’t we prickly tonight? That comment wasn’t a response to any criticism of me or my position; it was a response to the article. And since you’re the one continually directing posts to me, it appears you have more interest in my opinion than I do yours. With all due respect to your mind-reading skills, I don’t think I’m smarter than the other anonymous people on the football blog. Nor do I care. In truth, I assume many to be players, coaches, and execs who are much more knowledgeable on the game. And I’ve “met” owner-backers here with whom I’ve had very enlightening discussions. You’re just not one of them.

    It seems we’re all doing the same thing in the comments section: mouthing off. According to your theory, we’re refuting opposite opinions because we care deeply what everyone else thinks. Hmm. That’s good. I thought we were just in love with the sound of our own voices. :)

    Wow … so serious and defensive on that letter-opener line. Should we warn your coworkers? :shock:

  47. stairwayto7 says: Mar 26, 2011 11:49 PM

    HGH testing is a bad thing!

    Shawn Merriman

  48. duffer58 says: Mar 27, 2011 4:12 AM

    Chico,
    Fire the players? What are you going to replace them with? Wnba players?
    The players WANT to play they are being locked out. They are being asked to give back at a time when despite economy NO owner is losing money and the game still grew last year. Nobody in their right mind would take deak owners have offered.

  49. cylondetector says: Mar 27, 2011 6:26 AM

    Deb,

    You sure you have time for this?

    That cake isn’t going to bake itself.

  50. emperor83 says: Mar 27, 2011 8:34 AM

    The cheaters and junkies are opposed to testing. I did not see that coming…

  51. paperlions says: Mar 27, 2011 8:46 AM

    I would be opposed to the test simply because it doesn’t work. In what now must be 100s of 1000s of tests, not a single athlete has been caught using the HGH test. The only athlete “caught” using HGH was caught because the governing body was tipped off and he admitted it, not because the test works.
    .
    There is also the little fact that HGH does not have performance enhancing benefits and does nothing for a healthy adult. The NFL would be better served to educate its players so they don’t take things that have no positive effect (but that do have potential negative effects) than by paying millions of dollars to perform useless tests.

  52. Canyonero says: Mar 27, 2011 11:59 AM

    This should be a no-brainer. Players can’t use HGH, so there should be a test for it.

    I had to get blood drawn and tested for my job.

    Another example of “De-Smith” furiously demanding rights the players don’t have in the first place.

  53. nygiantstones says: Mar 27, 2011 1:19 PM

    On the contrary, as a member of the “public” I have to say that I have zero interest in seeing blood tests in the NFL. Obviously these guys juice in the off-season. Duh. I want my NFL players at their maximum size and strength. No interest in seeing blood tests, and I don’t care if they do steroids or HGH. This isn’t baseball where the records count for anything. I don’t care about anything else other than Superbowl victories.

  54. Deb says: Mar 27, 2011 2:15 PM

    cylondetector …

    Aw … a scifi fan. What a surprise :roll: I can multi-task, darlin’. It’s called w-o-m-a-n. Ask your dad. :)

  55. godofwine330 says: Mar 28, 2011 12:07 PM

    I’m scared of needles. When I got shots at the Naval Reserve Center in Cleveland they could hear my ass screaming. I was notorious. If I was diabetic I’d die unless my wife (who is a nurse) gave me shots in my sleep.

    I don’t do shots. And now that I am out of the military I DON’T DO SHOTS, PERIOD.

  56. Deb says: Mar 28, 2011 3:22 PM

    @godofwine330 …

    Bless you! Not an issue for me–used to give my own allergy injections every week–but everyone has some kind of issue like that. And having blood drawn is worse than getting a shot. Larger needle going into a vein.

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