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Vanden Bosch tells Lions to stay home, while other players plan to work Tuesday

Donovan McNabb AP

As Florio mentioned, the NFL didn’t appear to have a predetermined plan for what they would do if the lockout was lifted.   After the lockout was lifted Monday, the NFLPA* similarly seems a little unsure of what to do next.

The difference?  The players are on offense.

While Ryan Clark is telling Steelers teammates to show for work on Tuesday, Lions player rep Kyle Vanden Bosch has told his Lions teammates not to show up to the team’s practice facility yet.

“I don’t want to put the players or the team in a situation they don’t want to be in,” Vanden Bosch told Dave Birkett of the Detroit Free Press. “I don’t want to tell guys to go to find out that we can’t really workout there.”

Vanden Bosch just wants to wait at least a day to find out more.  Other players around the league will approach things differently.

Titans guard Jake Scott, the team’s (former) player rep, plans to show up to work out at the team facility Tuesday morning, according to Jim Wyatt of the Tennessean.  Other Titans will follow.

Shaun O’Hara, the player rep on the Giants, has essentially told his teammates to do whatever they feel is best, according to Ralph Vacchiano of the New York Daily News.

Most Giants will stay home, but some like defensive lineman Chris Canty plans to show up for work.  His agent Brad Blank believes that Canty may as well try to start collecting his workout bonus.

“I really don’t see the harm in going to work out and having a security guard tell you that you can’t,” Blank said. “It’s not going to be a big confrontation. So if they’re willing, I think it’s good idea that they show up.”

Vacchiano notes that other agents are telling their clients to stay home.   Reports are coming out fast and furious of players in other cities in “wait and see mode.”

We’re a little surprised the former NFLPA* didn’t have a clear plan in place, but they don’t necessarily need one.  The owners could be in violation of Judge Nelson’s lifting of the lockout if they don’t let players workout on Tuesday.  The players are just trying to go back to work like Nelson ordered.

In the end, the players, agents, and teams are a lot like the fans in many ways.

They have no idea what’s going on or what happens next.

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20 Responses to “Vanden Bosch tells Lions to stay home, while other players plan to work Tuesday”
  1. mizzouram says: Apr 25, 2011 10:50 PM

    Jacob Bell plays for the Rams.

  2. jaggedmark says: Apr 25, 2011 10:54 PM

    Talk about confusion.

    Calculus confuses Paris Hilton less than this is confusing everyone.

  3. jm11890 says: Apr 25, 2011 11:00 PM

    id love to call working out work. what a bunch of pigs. round em up and take em out back already

  4. hobartbaker says: Apr 25, 2011 11:11 PM

    The rooftop snipers have been supplied with photographs of which players the team considers expendable.

  5. soulman45 says: Apr 25, 2011 11:14 PM

    It will take a few days to know what is going on we have time.

  6. roscoepcoaltrain86 says: Apr 25, 2011 11:16 PM

    So what IF you show up to train, get hurt, then a day or two later the ruling is appealed? And that agent is telling his client to show up to get his bonus. Because the agent gets a piece of that I’m sure…. This type of greed is why we are dealing with all this BS in the first place.

  7. KIR says: Apr 25, 2011 11:16 PM

    Am I the only one who’s confused about some of these “fans” in here unhappy that the lock out is ending? The owners have already admitted that they are making a profit. How much only they know and is their secret. Why are actual “fans” unhappy that the lockout is ending?

  8. chatham10 says: Apr 25, 2011 11:23 PM

    I do not understand why the players would show up for work? I think that if workout bonus is not in their contract they would not get paid, is that correct?

  9. hosmachine says: Apr 25, 2011 11:27 PM

    I really don’t see the harm in going to work out and having a security guard tell you that you can’t,” Blank said. “It’s not going to be a big confrontation.

    Did you see Mall Cop. They want and thinkthey are Cops. Yeah some rent a cop who making $10-$12 an hour can tell some player who’s making big money and looking to get his workout bonus and theres not gonna be a confrontation. Hahaha good stuff. Look at the guys at the mall they hate there job and harass anyone just to make themselves feel better.

  10. bucforever says: Apr 25, 2011 11:29 PM

    Whoa,slow down folks, “It ain’t over till the fat lady sings” and Judge Nelson ain’t no fat lady. This whole thing will be drawn out as long as the owners can throw lawyers at it.

  11. jebdamone says: Apr 25, 2011 11:32 PM

    i think guys like vanden bosch are missing the point. yeah, you could work out somewhere else, but you just won a case awarding you the right to resume your activities at the team facilities. whether they let you in or not, the point of showing up is that you are exercising your right. it becomes even more of a problem for the owners if entire teams show up to start training and they attempt to prevent them. that’s when things would get interesting.

  12. jebdamone says: Apr 25, 2011 11:33 PM

    to answer your question KIR…i have no idea.

  13. drbandkgb says: Apr 25, 2011 11:34 PM

    I hope the players can tear apart the game I love

  14. pacificamjr says: Apr 25, 2011 11:48 PM

    kyle vanden bosche is not the leader of this team

    lions, show up for work and collect your bonuses.

    11-5; NFC 2011-12 Champion

  15. tinopuno says: Apr 25, 2011 11:53 PM

    jm11890 says: Apr 25, 2011 11:00 PM

    id love to call working out work. what a bunch of pigs. round em up and take em out back already

    ——————————————————————

    jm11890, It’s quite possible you might have been happier living in a different time. I’m thinking maybe Germany in the early 1940s.

  16. ggeden says: Apr 25, 2011 11:56 PM

    “The nation’s labor laws have always applied only where an action involves or grows out of a labor dispute. Such a labor relationship exists only where a union exists to bargain on behalf of its members. Where those employees effectively renounce the union as their collective bargaining agent — and accept the consequences of doing so — and elect to proceed in negotiating contracts individually, any disputes between the employees and their employers are no longer governed by federal labor law. Likewise, the Norris-LaGuardia Act, which applies only to preclude some injunctions in the context of ‘labor disputes,’ also no longer applies here to preclude injunctive relief. The NFL urges this Court to expand the law beyond these traditional dictates and argues that the protections of labor law should apply for some indefinite period beyond the collapse and termination of the collective bargaining relationship. In the absence of either persuasive policy or authority, this Court takes a more conservative approach, and declines to do so.

    “This Court, having found that the Union’s unequivocal disclaimer is valid and effective, concludes there is no need to defer any issue to the NLRB. Because that disclaimer is valid and effective, the Norris-LaGuardia Act’s prohibition against injunctive relief does not preclude granting the Player’s motion for a preliminary
    injunction against what the League characterizes as a ‘lockout.’

    “Based on the foregoing, and all the files, records and proceedings herein, IT IS
    HEREBY ORDERED that:

    “1. The Brady Plaintiffs’ motion for a preliminary injunction [Doc. No. 2] is
    GRANTED;

    “2. The Eller Plaintiffs’ motion for a preliminary injunction [Doc. No. 58] is
    MOOT; and

    “3. The ‘lockout’ is enjoined.”

    —–

    What this means is in layman’s terms is…

    Labor laws and disputes only exist when there’s a union, able to bargain on behalf of its members.

    When a union decertifies and players all become individuals negotiating contracts, and accept the risks that decertification brings, then those federal labor laws cease to apply.

    Meanwhile, the NFL asked Nelson to expand the period that the federal labors laws can apply, to that period after a union decertifies, an indefinite period after a collective bargaining process collapses.

    However, Nelson replied that there isn’t persuasive policy or authority to MAKE such a ‘new’ rule, and that therefore instead her court will act more conservatively and rejects the NFL’s proposal.

    In, other words, the NFL wanted labor laws to include indefinitely beyond an union’s decertification, and the judge rightfully rejected that proposal, saying effectively that’s not for her to decide, to make a new rule on, a higher court should, and that in the meantime going by existing laws, with the union decertified, therefore the lockout must end.

    She also said at the end that the Brady anti-trust case is accepted and will proceed. The Eller case is redundant and wont. And that the lockout is prohibited (enjoined).

  17. pisstol says: Apr 26, 2011 12:11 AM

    If the owners have nothing to hide why don’t they open the books?

    Because all their dirty little secrets will then come out showing their true take and they won’t have a case.

  18. msclemons67 says: Apr 26, 2011 2:06 AM

    pisstol says: Apr 26, 2011 12:11 AM

    If the owners have nothing to hide why don’t they open the books?
    =====================================

    Did you see how that worked for the NBA? The NBA opened its books and the players still refused to negotiate. Do you really think National Felon League players are any different?

  19. dhcurtss says: Apr 26, 2011 4:46 AM

    How can all these players be there teams players representatives, when the union doesn’t exist?? What a sham!!!

  20. emmonsh says: Apr 26, 2011 7:24 AM

    pisstol says:Apr 26, 2011 12:11 AM

    If the owners have nothing to hide why don’t they open the books?

    Because all their dirty little secrets will then come out showing their true take and they won’t have a case.

    they own the business. they dont have to show the players crap. the owners need to pay for the stadiums not the public. i hope they get back to the lock out and stays there for a year. let the bassstards go bankrupt or end up in jail as 90% of their male race is. havent seen 1 white man get in trouble yet

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