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NFLPA* needs to exercise some restraint in its rhetoric

DeMaurice Smith AP

As we’ve said time and again, and as we’ll continue to say as long as we think we need to, we haven’t taken sides in the labor dispute because we think each side bears plenty of blame.  As a result, we’ll criticize, when required, either or both sides.

The problem is that this practice causes the parties to sometimes focus only on the times we criticize their side, ignoring or forgetting the times we’ve criticized the other side.  We’ve got no quota or checklist in this regard; we criticize one side or the other based on whatever we notice that cries out for criticism.

It’s with that preface that I’ll now criticize the NFLPA* and executive director DeMaurice Smith for a habit of resorting to rhetoric in the wake of any positive development.  It’s a subject that was broached during Friday’s PFT Live discussion with Mike Silver of Yahoo! Sports, who disagreed to an extent with our position that, at times, Smith and company have been spiking the football a little too aggressively.

And then I saw the MDS blurb regarding Smith’s over the top Godfather reference during an on-air segment with our friends Boomer Esiason and Craig Carton.  Apart from the obvious generational confusion that can arise from a reference to going “to the mattresses” (some of the younger members of the audience thought it related to Chester Pitts’ and Raheem Brock’s telephone party), inflammatory comments like that serve no purpose.  It won’t get fans on the players’ side, and it definitely won’t soften up the owners to do a deal that the players will regard as acceptable.

If anything, twisting the tails of the men who run the game will serve only to make them more motivated to win, especially since the owners can’t respond to fighting words.  The owners know that, at some point, they’ll need the fans to re-embrace the players; thus, the owners can’t call the players liars or do an end-zone dance whenever a court ruling favors the league.

But the owners won’t forgive, or forget, being called liars by Smith.  And they definitely won’t forget misstatements from Smith that represent negligence at best, deliberate prevarication at worst.  For example, Smith previously told Mike Francesa of WFAN that the league hasn’t contributed to player pension plans for years, a grossly inaccurate contention that, as best we can tell, really pissed off the powers-that-be.

Smith’s most recent visit to the WFAN airwaves entailed a less controversial, but equally correct, misstatement.  Speaking of the players’ current frustration with the owners, Smith said that “[t]hey resent the fact that the league has been found now twice to have violated the law.”

Maybe in following the ins and outs of this dispute we missed a second violation of the law by the NFL.  True, the league violated the CBA by setting up a lockout fund in the most recent TV contracts.  But there’s no other violation of the law that has been documented.

As to the second alleged violation, Smith probably is referring to Judge Nelson’s order lifting the lockout.  (We’ve asked NFLPA* George Atallah to identify the second violation of the law; he has not yet responded to our e-mail.)  But Judge Nelson hasn’t found that the NFL violated any law by imposing the lockout.  Instead, she found that the players have a chance of ultimately proving a violation, and that given the nature of the harm the players are suffering, the lockout will be lifted while the litigation regarding the legality of the lockout proceeds.  (If Smith wasn’t a former litigator, he plausibly could claim he didn’t understand that distinction.)

Our guess is that Smith has opted for rhetoric, regardless of whether it’s factually accurate, in order to help hold the rank-and-file together, even as more than 500 players continue to wait to become free agents, as dozens of others miss roster and workout bonuses, and as all of them move closer and closer to missing game checks.  But the effort to ensure that the players’ resolve won’t crack could also be strengthening the owners’, making it even harder for the two sides to make real progress once the calendar moves to a point at which further delay will jeopardize starting the season on time.

The best approach?  Drop the rhetoric.  The fallback?  Make sure that the rhetoric meshes with, you know, the truth.

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92 Responses to “NFLPA* needs to exercise some restraint in its rhetoric”
  1. clownburger says: May 14, 2011 3:16 PM

    PFT needs to exercise some restraint in kissing the players butts.

  2. cincinnasti says: May 14, 2011 3:19 PM

    we haven’t taken sides in the labor dispute

    __________

    Right you just want the quickest solution.. Which is the players winning.. Wouldn’t that mean you’ve take the side of the players? Rather than looking at the long term effects of a players victory like losing revenue sharing, the salary floor, the salary cap, the franchise/transition tag, and the draft. You just want the lockout lifted and the problem fixed prematurely even if it does ruin the game we’ve all come to love. PFT doesn’t care about the idea of having any team win on any given Sunday. At least be willing to say your siding with the players because you feel their victory gives you football the quickest.

  3. geo1113 says: May 14, 2011 3:20 PM

    “The NFL’s self-serving anti-litigation PSA”

    “NFLPA* needs to exercise some restraint in its rhetoric”
    _________________________

    Hmmmm…which of these statements seems overly critical???

  4. backindasaddle says: May 14, 2011 3:20 PM

    DeMaurice Smith is simply displaying his over abundant ego getting control over his mouth.

  5. ravensfan4life52 says: May 14, 2011 3:21 PM

    I’m sorry Smith didn’t the NFLPA disband? doesn’t that mean that you are out of a job? I mean you shouldn’t have a job anyways considering how much of an imbecile and a liar you are. I hope the lockout gets lifted because that means the union is gone and i hope it stays gone. from now on do what an earlier article suggested on pft. a simple majority vote by the players. DeMaurice Smith is an idiot.

  6. sneaky1632 says: May 14, 2011 3:24 PM

    This situation is getting more out of hand by the day, the owners should put a deal on the table, have a mediator or such determine if it is fair to all parties, then tell the players accept or have fun in the UFL.

  7. chapnastier says: May 14, 2011 3:38 PM

    “As we’ve said time and again, and as we’ll continue to say as long as we think we need to, we haven’t taken sides in the labor dispute because we think each side bears plenty of blame.”

    You know I actually beleive you. I think that you guys are just really, really smart and you know how to get comments going. When you get comments going, you get hits and in a slow news period you need all the hits you can get to remain profitable.

    I may not agree with the tactics but I understand them. You guys are the best at itnteracting with your readers. No other site does that. So well played.

  8. jethro007 says: May 14, 2011 3:38 PM

    “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

  9. dolphincritic says: May 14, 2011 3:43 PM

    It appears that Smith chose the courts as the venue for settling this strike a long time ago; thus the decertification and class action suits. I don’t know enough about labor law to fully understand how a lockout serves the best interests of the owners but their appeal was predictable. I think that the fans have to hope that TV will show college games on Sundays and Mondays as well as Thursdays to fill the void. When those tearing the golden goose to shreds realize that the fan has moved on and the advertisers have followed, they will both come to the table and talk nicely to each other.

  10. pappageorgio says: May 14, 2011 3:45 PM

    The truth is……without rhetoric, misstatements, and outright lies D Smith will have nothing to say and nothing to make himself appear relevant to this situation at all.

    He really can’t win his rank and file over with actual truth or facts so he stoops to getting the players riled up and angry about perceived disrespect and untruths.

    I said it yesterday…..the reason that the players are saying they “hate” goodell so much is that he’s making Dee look very foolish from a public speaking/PR perspective.

  11. PFTiswhatitis says: May 14, 2011 3:46 PM

    Mike you talk about one side or the other “winning”…in a sucessful negotiation neither party wins, both should feel as if they gave a lot. Until they get a mentality of negotiation, nobody will win, especially the fans.

  12. kyle90 says: May 14, 2011 3:46 PM

    I don’t believe people can or should “not take sides” in a dispute. Unless both sides are exactly 50% to blame – which is never the case – it’s impossible to “not take sides”.

  13. heroofthisparish says: May 14, 2011 3:54 PM

    When you state “…making it even harder for the two sides to make real progress once the calendar moves to a point at which further delay will jeopardize starting the season on time”, that implies that De Smith has any intention of ever negotiating.

    From everything said and seen, for Smith it seems to be either the old deal (and making it as embarrassing as possible for the owners) or destruction of the NFL as we know it. I don’t think his ego will allow him to make any concessions that might enable a deal, which is why I am not pro owner, but I am hugely anti De Smith.

  14. kyle90 says: May 14, 2011 3:56 PM

    “It’s with that preface that I’ll now criticize the NFLPA* and executive director DeMaurice Smith”

    WOOO!!!

  15. schemefactory says: May 14, 2011 3:57 PM

    what would be wrong with taking the side of the workers? are all the commenters here big business owners, or are you all thinking that working your way up the corporate ladder is a recipe for success, so you toe the company line no matter what the conversation is about? i really would like an answer as to why anyone, no, MOST everyone who comments here, is supporting ownership? why? because they “take the risks, therefore deserve all the profits”? which i’ve seen a lot. why, on god’s earth, do most of you think the owners are somehow righteous, and the players are disengenuine? if you grew up disliking rich people, which you should have, then those who go from rags to riches instead of riches to more riches, are the ones you would associate more with.

  16. neraptor says: May 14, 2011 3:57 PM

    I think the owners see a truth that pft and demoron are missing. When reading comments on various sites the overwhelming majority are against the players. Pft making comments that the fans are not showing their anger are completely misplaced to say the least. Unions are a major burden on the economy and create extremely uncompetitive company’s. ( see Toyota vs GM as the perfect example). Time for the players to stop being such spoiled brats. they are being paid huge sums of money to play a sport they love. The owners started this league. Its their league their companies Players are employees like the rest of us ( but compensated alot better than your average Joe plumber). Stop whining grow up and go back to work! PS TB12 thanks for putting your name in the spot light for this fiasco!

  17. oldbyrd says: May 14, 2011 3:58 PM

    It makes me sick to have see this minature commie shoot his mouth off. He is a idiot. Terribly under qualified and far over his head in this matter. I think even the NFLPA sees this now. If I were the owners, I would just sit it out and watch the( can’t do anything else boys )come a runnin. After all the years these guys play, 80% retire broke. That’s a fact. Does this not tell you something about the intelligence of the NFLPA? How can you retire broke when you make millions? Get back to work employees.

  18. purplescar says: May 14, 2011 3:59 PM

    I seriously don’t give a steaming poop who is at fault or to blame anymore. It comes back to the earlier post regarding fan anger. A pot boils when it boils and not before. Both the players and the league should start listening for the whistle.

  19. timmytoad says: May 14, 2011 4:01 PM

    The players need to shove DeMo’s Fedora down to his neck Three Stoogies style and then duct tape his mouth. Have Vrabel round up some beers and have Jerry Jones pound a few and then get the deal done between the two. It will never happen with Smith and players need to wake up.

  20. commandercornpone says: May 14, 2011 4:03 PM

    duh = bam

    and neither belongs in the job he holds.

  21. jimphin says: May 14, 2011 4:07 PM

    Using that type of rhetoric only proves that they are not currently actively trying to negotiate an agreement. They are only trying to win a legal battle. But, I guess I really can’t blame DeSmith too much…that is what litigators do.

    He is certainly not in the running for the Nobel Peace prize.

    Not only should DeSmith step away from the smarmy tongue lashings…he should freak us all out by letting something good slip out.

  22. arkadyrenko says: May 14, 2011 4:10 PM

    I can’t wait for the entire labor mess to be over so I won’t have to read any more crap about legal motions or judges’ rulings or any more of PFT’s verbal gymnastics about impartiality.

    I don’t care about Roger Goodell or DeMaurice Smith. I don’t care about the opinion of any of the owners or players regarding the optimal way of dividing up billions of dollars. I definitely don’t care which side PFT supports (if any).

    I care about football, and all of y’all are perilously close to screwing it up.

  23. 3yardsandacloud says: May 14, 2011 4:10 PM

    While this is only conjecture and speculation, perhaps the second violation was when the NFL refused to lift the lockout immediately, thereby being technically in contempt of court?

  24. thegreatest4210 says: May 14, 2011 4:14 PM

    I love reading the comments on all the articles about the labor dispute, its like the majority of you all have tunnel vision.You all are so adamant that the players are wrong and Dsmith the the spawn of satin you fail to acknowledge a few things about the players.

    The average life of a player that plays for 4 or more years is age 55. 20 years less then the average American male. Then all you ignorant people out there will say well get a job like the rest of us. But maybe just maybe some players didnt have the same opportunities as you and football is their way of survival. They took the skills god gave them and put them to work. So is it really that absurd they want to preserve their families futures and livelihood when they are gone? I do not think so.

    Then i think you all forget that playing football isnt a easy thing, and if you all had a sniff of the talent to do it you would. The players put in just as much work as any one else if not more. Seems to me like there are an abundance of jealous and surely people out there that would love to have had a chance to play, but didnt , and get mad at the people that do.

    And anyone and everyone that is all for the idea of shut the league down, get rid of the players, we root for our team not the players..YOU ARE

  25. thegreatest4210 says: May 14, 2011 4:17 PM

    YOU ARE OUTSIDE YOUR MIND…im a ravens fan and no one is coming to the games if flacco, ray lewis, ed reed arnt playing and your as naive and gullible as they get if you think people would.

  26. hobartbaker says: May 14, 2011 4:18 PM

    DeMotormouth DeMean DeProcess by DeMonizing DeLeague.

  27. nflfan101 says: May 14, 2011 4:19 PM

    When I read the whole post, it proves to me that D. Smith does not want to negotiate and never has wanted to negotiate. His comments now are designed to make sure that there cannot and will not be any meaningful negotiations.

    If D. Smith was the least bit interested in resolving this matter, he would have figured out what other issues are important to players and then gave a little on the money in exchange for the other issues.

    For example, why not trade a little bit of the money for reduced restricted agency so that players can get to their big contracts quicker?

    FACT: D. Smith walked out of CBA negotiations, decertified the union, had certain players file suit, and did not attend at least on court ordered mediation session. The owners have begged for negotiations.

  28. hobartbaker says: May 14, 2011 4:19 PM

    Dis Miss Smith.

  29. hedleykow says: May 14, 2011 4:30 PM

    NFLPA* couldn’t care less about the public perception of its rhetoric.

    Maybe some of you class acts didn’t get the memo, but Joe six-pack doesn’t get a vote in contract developments between the NFL and the NFLPA*.

    Haters, please, stop making fools of yourselves over this. Stick to what you are good at, which is screwing teachers, firemen, and nurses out of their pay.

  30. scudbot says: May 14, 2011 4:33 PM

    schemefactory says: May 14, 2011 3:57 PM, ” what would be wrong with taking the side of the workers? ”
    Cool, today they’re “workers” and not “partners”. Anyway, nothing’s wrong with it if you want elite players to be able to make even more money and be able to hop teams like jackrabbits. Unfortunately that means the journeymen football players will get screwed over (no floor) and that there’s be a few elite teams and a bunch of has been also ran teams that you won’t be able to find on TV after a few years. But nice try.

  31. lovesportsandsurfing says: May 14, 2011 4:36 PM

    De Smith to me seems highly uneducated. He has a law degree I presume, but he acts like a guy who bought some degree at a flea market and nobody bothered to look at it closely. De Smith I have found from day one to be just flat out a stupid man. Hes not clever, quick witted, smart. Hes just a little guy that was voted into this position and now cant back it up with intelligence. When I see himn on tv talking, trying to act smart, its hard to look at, because hes clearly not smart. And if anyone were to dare question his intelligence he would scream racism, call the ACLU, NAACP,…because thats what people like that do, thats what those organizations are there for, to protect guys like him, who dont have what it takes to take care of themselves. Those orgs are for the weak crybabies of this country.

  32. mick730 says: May 14, 2011 4:38 PM

    ” if you grew up disliking rich people, which you should have,”

    WTF kind of comment is this? So you grew up hating rich people? Mind telling us what qualifies one as “rich” in that class based little mind of yours? Is it 250k per year in income or what? Or is “rich” simply anybody who makes more than you?

    What a small minded hateful little creature you must be.

    And as far as supporting the “workers”; what “workers” would those be in this instance? In your hateful little mind, very well paid and “rich” pro football players are “workers”? Really? Workers of the world unite, huh? You mean the “workers” who work 16 days per year, for about 16 minutes for each of those 16 days? Those “workers”? You’ve got to be kidding me. So this is what the American labor movement as degenerated into?

  33. neraptor says: May 14, 2011 4:40 PM

    If the players were worried about long term. The rhetoric would be different. They would be arguing about pensions ad long term health care. The players are about one thing. “show me the money!”. Lets think about something here. If we have a rookie salary cap and pos players like jmarklazyass russell doesn’t get 36 million dollars where does that money go? Ahh to the veterans of course. The owners are already giving them a bigger chunk of the pie. It’s absurd the whole thing is. The players are striking because they want more money that’s it that’s the facts that’s the truth end of story. If we don’t have football this year its the players fault no Ifs ands or buts about it. The owners have a right to protect “their companies”.

  34. tommyf15 says: May 14, 2011 4:41 PM

    sneaky1632 says:
    This situation is getting more out of hand by the day, the owners should put a deal on the table, have a mediator or such determine if it is fair to all parties, then tell the players accept or have fun in the UFL.

    This site needs to include this blurb in every single article in great big capital letters:

    IT WOULD BE ILLEGAL FOR THE OWNERS TO LOCK OUT THE PLAYERS AND THEN HIRE REPLACEMENTS

    Thank you.

  35. hail74 says: May 14, 2011 4:49 PM

    I think most people are pro owner for the simple reason that they want to negotiate a new cba and the players don’t. I’m fine with the players thinking of themselves as partners not employees but if your partner is unhappy with the current deal and wants to negotiate a new one why not come to an agreement. Its fine for the union to go on strike or for individuals to hold out of their contract to garner a new deal so the owners should be allowed to do the same.

  36. 2011to2020lions says: May 14, 2011 4:49 PM

    I love the players but side with the owners, at least they had a deal on the table. De Smith just had to counter the offer he thought would be fair, and meet in the middle

  37. willycents says: May 14, 2011 4:49 PM

    thegreatest4210 says:May 14, 2011 4:17 PM

    YOU ARE OUTSIDE YOUR MIND…im a ravens fan and no one is coming to the games if flacco, ray lewis, ed reed arnt playing and your as naive and gullible as they get if you think people would
    —————————————————–
    @ thegreatest4210

    So, what you are telling us is that you are not a ravens fan, but a fan of the three players mentioned, and when they retire/traded you will no longer be a Ravens fan. What a piss-poor ravens fan you must be….LMAO @ you and any other supposed fans like you.

  38. schemefactory says: May 14, 2011 4:54 PM

    since when are corporate types more likeable than working class folks? really- when did that happen?

  39. warhorse007 says: May 14, 2011 4:59 PM

    @thegreatest 4210

    Who cares how long their careers are? They are BLESSED to even play a single down and get paid lots of money.

    Like every citizen, they need to have a fallback plan in place. Just because theyre football players, they deserve the right to work for four years and then retire wealthy with full medical, etc, etc??

    Those same skills are skills that can allow them to work just like the rest of working america. Go dig coal, but go ahead and do it faster than the rest of us. They put in the work, and they get PAID to put in the work. More than most americans DREAM of.

    So you can stop with the pining about how tough it is for NFL caliber football players bud.

    No one is making them play, and if they dont want to risk the injury for the money, then they dont have to sign on the dotted line, do they?

    STALE argument.

  40. grandpoopah says: May 14, 2011 4:59 PM

    I see Goodell’s interns work weekends.

  41. kyle90 says: May 14, 2011 5:00 PM

    This site’s motto should be “PFT: Where If You Disagree, You Must Be An Impostor”

  42. TheRealist says: May 14, 2011 5:03 PM

    that dude is a prick, real talk.

  43. commandercornpone says: May 14, 2011 5:08 PM

    people will go to scab games.

  44. geo1113 says: May 14, 2011 5:20 PM

    thegreatest4210 says: “The average life of a player that plays for 4 or more years is age 55.”
    ________________________

    Where did you get that number? I just looked at the 1960s Philadelphia Eagles roster. Of those I verified as dead, their average age at death is 64 years old. I see quite a few who are still alive and the youngest one is 73.

    It is easy to toss around numbers but you have to research and sourtce those numbers otherwise they are meaningless.

  45. bunjy96 says: May 14, 2011 5:22 PM

    thegreatest4210 says: May 14, 2011 4:17 PM

    YOU ARE OUTSIDE YOUR MIND…im a ravens fan and no one is coming to the games if flacco, ray lewis, ed reed arnt playing and your as naive and gullible as they get if you think people would.

    __________________

    History has proven you wrong. Many many fans watched the scabs play.

  46. horsecore says: May 14, 2011 5:26 PM

    thegreatest4210 says:

    “…the spawn of satin…”

    LOL.

  47. tjrubleysaudible says: May 14, 2011 5:45 PM

    The spawn of satin? I’d buy him being the cretin of chapeaus, spawn of satin might be a bit much. I think being outside of your mind is thinking that players have such a rough lives, and have had to work harder than most everybody else, and haven’t had the advantages others have. PLEASE, hello, FREE EDUCATION???? Hundreds of thousands a year minimum? You got any clue how many years of education go into becoming a doctor? 12 years beyond secondary. That’s 24 years of school. Know how much a doctor sleeps during the first 2 years of residency? Close to not at all. And that’s just one profession.

    I suppose you also believe what Vick said about how nobody’s ever had it tougher than him, except you believe it about all these spoiled brats. You probably also believe what that dimwit said a few years ago about it being war and how he’s a soldier. It’s called being delusional, have someone look it up for you and then explain it to you.

  48. grs27 says: May 14, 2011 5:50 PM

    thegreatest4210 says: May 14, 2011 4:14 PM

    “But maybe just maybe some players didnt have the same opportunities as you and football is their way of survival”.

    ————————————————————-

    So your saying that the college scholarships, gifts, being treated like a celebrity, endorsement deals, ect., are LESS of an opportunity than the rest of us have??
    I would argue that most BLOW the opportunities given to them, and don’t plan for life after football.

  49. kom2k10 says: May 14, 2011 5:54 PM

    schemefactory says:
    May 14, 2011 3:57 PM
    what would be wrong with taking the side of the workers? are all the commenters here big business owners, or are you all thinking that working your way up the corporate ladder is a recipe for success, so you toe the company line no matter what the conversation is about? i really would like an answer as to why anyone, no, MOST everyone who comments here, is supporting ownership? why?
    ————————–

    We’re not business owners, but we’re smart enough to look beyond the idea that “If the players win, then we’ll have football faster”. That is so shortsighted and I think anyone who believes in this theory or the theory that “I go to the game to watch the players, not the owners” is a moron!

    If the players win, yes there will be football faster, but at what cost??? No salary cap! If your team is in a small or midsize market, your favorite players are probably going to be gone and signed by New York or Chicago because they will be able to pay them as much as they want. I’m a Colts fan and because of the salary cap and the way they currently structure contracts, my team has been able to stay competitive and keep a top player like Peyton Manning in Indianapolis for the past 13 years! Under the new rules, only the big market teams would be able to afford Manning!

    It would be just like baseball…. the same 4 or 6 teams would be competing for a championship and the other 26 teams will do just enough to maintain a profit.

    Don’t forget to add in that the players are suing the NFL and saying the draft is illegal…

    That is why we root for the owners

    (disclaimer: I am not a paid employee of the NFL)

  50. steelergold says: May 14, 2011 6:00 PM

    For once the Ftard isn’t wearing that stupid hat. The hat must have gotten too small for his ego swollen head.

  51. chapnastier says: May 14, 2011 6:01 PM

    @ thegreatest

    You mean you didn’t watch the games before Flacco got their? So they have bandwagon fans on that side of the Potomac too?

  52. deathspiralx says: May 14, 2011 6:19 PM

    Hopefully at some point someone in both groups remembers (and has the juice to make it stick) that for the long term benefit of everyone (including the fans) the natural tendency to want to make this a win-lose proposition needs to be avoided.

    I wish the judge would put a gag order on them. The fans don’t need or want to be in the middle of their propaganda war.

    NFL & Players union, quit your yapping and negotiate a solution, you douche bags.

  53. endzonezombie says: May 14, 2011 6:22 PM

    The players are delighted that one of the lead shills for the owners is named clownburger.

  54. bluepike says: May 14, 2011 6:36 PM

    If DeMaurice Smith would have counter-offered and continued to negotiate back on March 11, instead of rushing into litigation (his plan all along), I’m very sure there would have been a new CBA in place by now. All we’ve ended-up with is nine weeks of NOTHING!

    We owe all of this to one person and one person only – De Smith. The players have hitched their wagon to a total impudent, ignorant jackass (and I still can’t figure out why). The very transparent and vile De Smith is one of the most digusting human beings that I’ve ever had the displeasure of observing in my entire life. And PFT is just NOW finding out what he is like?!!! Amazing. Just amazing>

  55. fergie22 says: May 14, 2011 6:38 PM

    younger members, i wrote the pitts and butt buddy post and i am 63 years old and have been a fan of the nfl for almost 60 years but no more

  56. glen1904 says: May 14, 2011 6:55 PM

    If the future of the game is truly in jeopardy why not agree to open your books to the Court, prove it and all fans and the majority of players will agree to fix and preserve the league and get on with it.
    4210 I don’t understand why some try to get these pro billionaire/ anti union elderly mega ditto’s to respond in a reasonable way to these stories? After all, despite 30 years of evidence it doesn’t they still believe in “Trickle down economics”??? It’s not going to happen. so if you want good unbiased conversation on this matter stick to discussions on this subject find a younger group of fans.

  57. xxxfixxxerxxx says: May 14, 2011 6:55 PM

    Thumbs up = playing in the NFL a privilege

    Thumbs down = playing in the NFL a right

    More and more I get this sense that the players and the people that support the players think the game belongs to them. I keep reading the players make the NFL, that without them there wouldn’t be an NFL.
    I’ve read on the Bills boards I frequent that the sport could do without the owners, as if they already served their purpose. I think it’s crazy talk but I see this idea thrown around more and more.

    I think it’s crazy and pratically impossible for cities to buy their respective teams from the owners and implement what the Green Bay Packers have going for them. What county or city can get the cash to do it?

    With this in mind what do you think, is playing in the NFL a right or a privilege?

  58. tommyf15 says: May 14, 2011 7:06 PM

    bluepike says:
    If DeMaurice Smith would have counter-offered and continued to negotiate back on March 11, instead of rushing into litigation (his plan all along)

    If it was his plan all along then why did the NFLPA ask (and receive) an extension for negotiations from March 3 to March 11?

    It’s laughable when people say the players didn’t negotiate in good faith. There was a federally appointed mediator present- don’t you think that mediator would have called the NFLPA out if they weren’t negotiating in good faith.

    The tone here is generally “the players should be grateful to be playing football, and they should take whatever the owners give them”. Maybe the rest of you just lay down like dogs and do whatever your told, but under Smith the players have taken a more courageous path.

  59. kom2k10 says: May 14, 2011 7:11 PM

    thegreatest4210 says:
    May 14, 2011 4:14 PM
    I love reading the comments on all the articles about the labor dispute, its like the majority of you all have tunnel vision.You all are so adamant that the players are wrong and Dsmith the the spawn of satin you fail to acknowledge a few things about the players.

    The average life of a player that plays for 4 or more years is age 55. 20 years less then the average American male.
    ——————————

    IT IS A MYTH THAT THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN IS 55.20 YEARS!!! PLEASE reference an actual study that states this fact! THERE ISN’T ONE!!!

    Here is a website that shows every NFL’s players death ( http://www.oldestlivingprofootball.com/ ) and if you look at all the players who passed away from 2000-2010 it averages out to 73.9 years old!

    PLUS… if someone only works in the NFL for 4 years, why shouldn’t they have to work or do anything else after that?? There’s nothing that says because I played in the NFL for 4 years, I should never have to worry about money or insurance ever again…

    Give me a break…. these “slaves” are so spoiled and have no sense of the reality that all of us have to live in today…

  60. glen1904 says: May 14, 2011 7:12 PM

    With the current climate of witch business is done in this country and the down right lies and trickery in how it’s been conducted in recent years any group of employees or investors that doesn’t investigate and authenticate claims and statements is a group of fools.

  61. 411dooleybug1 says: May 14, 2011 7:13 PM

    If it weren’t for Me Smith, a new labor agreement would already be in place. Guaran-dam-teed.

    Why is it that these attorneys, for both parties, think we care a whit who is to blame or who deserves credit? They have to know the more they talk, the more fans move away from supporting either side and come closer to walking away from the sport. But that would, of course, mean that they actually cared what the fans think – instead, I have to believe they just like to hear themselves talk.

    I have never been a huge college football fan but I am really beginning to get excited about the upcoming college season. The nice thing? My wife is a Vols fan and I am a Hurricanes fan – and we both like each others teams enough to watch and cheer for them. That also mean two enjoyable games a week. Of course, I am a Dolphins fan so I guess I’m in for as much disappointment if they play the season as if they don’t.

    Being a Fins fan these days (with the likes of Henne, Sparano, Ireland and that schmuck Ross as the faces of the franchise) is akin to liking disco: It might be something you enjoy but you’d never want to admit it to anyone.

  62. whatswiththehate says: May 14, 2011 7:28 PM

    IMO, I do believe the sports media, including this site, have taken sides and that’s because it’s easy. It’s easy to sway people into hating these athletes because we live in a dog-eat-dog society. We’re constantly encouraged to be jealous of the athletes.

    As much as many hate the rich busniess owners because they are rich and getting richer, it’s easier to hate those who went from having nothing or very little to making millions because you either feel that that should be you or you feel they shouldn’t make so much money playing a sport you’re under the impression is simply recreational.

    But let’s be honest, many kids see themselves as football players but few make it through high school. Fewer make it through college. And even fewer make it into the NFL. Think about it…

    Out of the thousands of college kids who signed up for the draft only a few hundred get into the draft and out of that number only 200 get into the NFL. And out of those 200, half may actually see a playing field nevermind make any money.

    We won’t even go into the life span of these football players, which in reality is getting shorter and shorter because of the demand on their bodies starting on the college level.

    Then compare those athletes to someone who never has to suit up a day in his life. Doesnt have to risk life nor limb but get to make billions simply because he bought a team. In other words, they took a risk. Some of these are owned for generations by the same family like the Pittburgh Steelers.

    Neither one of the Manning boys kids are guarantee to be as exceptionally talented as those before them but the owners of these teams kids, grandkids and maybe even greatgrandkids are guarantee to still own these teams in most cases.

    Let me put things into perspective for some of you. Some of these teams are investments to some of these owners. For many of these athletes, they are the sole bread winner in their family and by the time they hit their forties, some of these football players bodies aren’t any good to them.

  63. fatfreddystubbs says: May 14, 2011 8:36 PM

    geo1113 says:
    May 14, 2011 5:20 PM
    thegreatest4210 says: “The average life of a player that plays for 4 or more years is age 55.”
    ________________________

    Where did you get that number? I just looked at the 1960s Philadelphia Eagles roster. Of those I verified as dead, their average age at death is 64 years old. I see quite a few who are still alive and the youngest one is 73.

    ————————————————–
    @geo1113

    I once read something that explained that 55yr life-span number. I hope i explain this right, but they said that that study only takes into account players that are deceased, making the number deceptively low, because it didn’t take into account the thousands of players that are still alive. So, yes, the average lifespan of deceased NFL players at the time of the study probably actually was 55.

    But, using your good example of the ’60 Eagles, the average lifespan of the players no longer living is 64, but off the top of my head, I know that Chuck Bednarik is in his mid-80′s, so, if you’re to look at it years from now when nobody on that team is still with us, it will be significantly higher than 64.

  64. tommyf15 says: May 14, 2011 8:40 PM

    neraptor says:
    The players are striking because they want more money that’s it that’s the facts that’s the truth end of story.

    Facts? Truth?

    Someone that doesn’t know the difference between a lockout and a strike should do a lot more reading and a lot less typing.

  65. mick730 says: May 14, 2011 8:41 PM

    “For many of these athletes, they are the sole bread winner in their family and by the time they hit their forties, some of these football players bodies aren’t any good to them.”

    Oh, I get it. The league minimum of 375k per year isn’t enough for the players to feed their families? Get real.

    Second, name me the last player who died on the field playing in a NFL game. They aren’t risking life and limb to play football. Please don’t try and compare playing in the NFL for millions to what our troops do protecting our country. If one of them happens to die from heat exhaustion, they more likely than not would have died somewhere else from being so ridiculously fat and out of shape.

    Third. Nobody forces these guys to play football. If they get drafted by a NFL team, it’s not like the armed services draft of prior years; they don’t have to go into the league just because they are drafted. In fact, if they declare up front that they will be brain surgeons instead of rookies, nobody will draft them. End of worries.

    And let me put some things in perspective for you: Today, one in five adult males between the ages of 18 and 54 in this country cannot get up every morning and go to work. Pro football players with but a few exceptions have never had a job. They have been pampered all their lives. They are spoiled rotten and have a sense of entitlement that is unsurpased except perhaps by players in the NBA.

    Lastly, nobody is talking about taking away any of their money. The owners last offer stated that very plainly. We are talking about the owners saying that player salaries cannot continue to escalate at an average of 15% per year. The financials of the last CBA are unsustainable. That’s all there is to it.

    Nobody is talking about imposing a hardship on any NFL player. The owners and most of the fans want a CBA that works for both parties that will ensure the financial stability of the 32 teams in the league.

    You see, most real NFL fans are fans of their teams. Most pro players on here can be divided into one of the following groupings:

    1. People who have an ideological ax to grind. They hate rich people and view the owners as rich. See some of the preceeding posts if you don’t beleive me.

    2. People who have a racial ax to grind. These people see the owners as “old rich white guys” and view the players as what they are, majority black. These people view everything through the prism of race. So sad.

    3. Labor union activists. These people are also ideological and are frantic at the fact that organized labor is about to disappear in the private sector of the American economy. What’s left of labor, outside of pro sports, are government workers who are fastly learning that the taxpayer is fed up with them.

    4. Groupies. Strange, strange people, with an even stranger emotional attachment to people they don’t even know.

  66. tjrubleysaudible says: May 14, 2011 8:50 PM

    whatswiththehate:

    Who has become a billionaire by buying a football team? What makes you think these players’ lifespans are getting shorter, and that it is caused by having played in the NFL, and not any other cause? What study was that?

    Who hates people who have gone from having nothing to having something?? You??? I don’t. I root for people succeeding, failure is too common. As a matter of fact, Donald Driver is my very favorite current player because of where he has come from, where he is, and how he handles it.

    What is all this about not getting through high school or college? Huh? I really don’t understand that bit. I guess you’re saying that SINCE these NFL Players DID make it through high school, and college, and into the NFL, they are OWED a sh**load of money, insurance, and retirement before age 30?

    It must be very nice that these athlete’s families only need one bread-winner. Everybody I know works, moms and dads. A lot of other peoples’ bodies aren’t any good for them at 40ish either, but they have to keep working.

    All of the entitlement mentality, greed, and narcissism this whole lockout mess has revealed is sickening. Yeah I’m sure we all suspected/knew some of this was there in the NFL, but I really, really didn’t need to have the spotlight shown on it for me. It’s like knowing your parents had to”do it” for you to be alive, it’s just something you’d rather not have to think about or even acknowledge.

    Hope that last sentenced ruined somebody’s night.

  67. alexanderisland says: May 14, 2011 9:56 PM

    True, the league violated the CBA by setting up a lockout fund in the most recent TV contracts. But there’s no other violation of the law that has been documented.
    ………………………………………………..

    Disclaimer: I am not a leech, err I mean lawyer, nor am I an employee of the league or a player, etc. I have no affiliation with anything regarding the NFL, except being a life long Oakland Raider fan.

    I am not so sure that this statement is completely true; I agree that the NFL would be contractually bount to maximise the dollar amount of the TV contracts, but this is only true and binding up to the culmination of said agreement, i.e. if the CBA goes up to 2011, then whatever the league negotiates is completely out of the has no bearing on anything the union says; they may want, but they have nothing to stand on. I don’t know if this is the case or not, but I have no access to the TV contracts or anything, so this is pure speculation.

    Regarding the lockout, this is more for the team’s protection more than anything; if the lockout is lifted and a set of rules set across the board, then the league is just propping themselves up to be sued for an anti-trust violation. Simple as that – the owners aren’t just doing this to spite the players, they are doing it to protect themselves from a myriad of individual lawsuits. They had to do this because of the union disbanding; had they not decertified, the NFL could have just posted their last, best offer and those would have been the rules that they would have played under; this is allowed under labour law, however the decertification does not allow the NFL to do this.

  68. hlmatty1 says: May 14, 2011 10:25 PM

    Once again,this site spouts legal gibberish. The NFL has not been found to have violated even one “law.” The have been found to have violated a contract and a “duty” they had. Laws are those requirements enacted by a legislature.

  69. goldsteel says: May 14, 2011 11:11 PM

    None of the posturing or strutting from either side matters at the moment. Only time will bring the sides together and get a deal done. Everyone has to wait until late June for anything to happen.

  70. wigwam101 says: May 14, 2011 11:22 PM

    Should D. Smith and the players get their way and destroy the NFL as it is currently constituted, could individual teams (the Packers and other small-market teams come to mind) dissolve themselves, and reform in a new league? One that would allow them to compete on an even playing field? Just wondering.

  71. abninf says: May 14, 2011 11:38 PM

    thegreatest4210 says: May 14, 2011 4:14 PM

    Then all you ignorant people out there will say well get a job like the rest of us. But maybe just maybe some players didnt have the same opportunities as you and football is their way of survival.
    —————————————————-
    Almost all went to college tuition free. Nobody else’s fault but theirs if they didn’t opt to stay and get their degree so they could be successful without football. Yet another reason I feel no sorrow for them right now.

  72. thefiesty1 says: May 14, 2011 11:54 PM

    Then get rid of DeMo!

  73. lilb360 says: May 15, 2011 12:34 AM

    Smith is a piece of crap, and a major reason that I side with the owners in this travesty. He is an ambulance chaser, obviously he wants this to be played out in the courts, because that is where lawyers make most of their money. I believe that if you remove Smith from this situation the league and the players would have had a deal months ago. I just wonder how long it will take the players to realize that Demaurice Smith is largley to blame for them being locked out, and the sooner they cut ties with him the faster they will be back to work. As fans we should all throw trash at smith if we see him walking down the street!

  74. ravensfan4life52 says: May 15, 2011 12:38 AM

    @thegreatest4210

    I’m a die hard ravens fan and it would be unfortunate if replacement players took the field, but if Ozzie puts together a team made up of anybody I’m gonna go see it, regardless if i know who the people are our not. and the players, well most of them at least, went to college FOR FREE! and i’m not gonna feel bad for them if they drop out before graduating to enter the draft and then only play 3 years and can’t find a job. that’s their fault. no one forced them to drop out before graduation. and still most people, last time i checked anyways, make somewhere between $1 and $1.5 million in their lifetime. even if a player sits on the bench for 3 years, he’s probably gonna make somewhere around $300,000 a year. that’s $900,000 for 3 years of work. he’s almost reached what an average person makes in a life time in 3 years.

    So I’m sorry if i don’t feel bad or these players who blow all of their money and then retire broke. and please don’t lump every ravens fan into a group with you and say that we won’t show up if Lewis and Flacco don’t take the field. The real fans will be there, but you can feel free to stay at home.

  75. jbcommonsense says: May 15, 2011 12:44 AM

    Polls show that a majority of football fans primarily blame the owners for the lockout endangering football. It’s obvious that PFT was right about bored, resentful league employees are flooding post here.

    Here’s a direct message to all of you: I hope your owner employers decide that the next best method of saving money is to axe some you dutiful peon gophers. Then you can stop looking down your noses at worker’s rights.

  76. maxvv says: May 15, 2011 1:33 AM

    I might get a ton of thumbs down for this, but whatever. Maybe I’m too far down the page for that.

    For the life of me, I can’t understand why this particular website’s commentors skew so heavily pro-owner. Nowhere else does the slant seem so heavily one-sided, especially in this direction.

    Moreover, I can’t figure out why ANYONE would support the damn owners in the first place.

  77. mikeb4u says: May 15, 2011 2:25 AM

    The best that the players could do is get rid of D Smith.

    What needs to be done is to dismiss the law suits, and get back to the bargaining table. The owners have their last offer, and the NFLPA needs to submit their offer of a CBA. Then sit down to BINDING arbitration and–LETS PLAY FOOTYBALL. Enough time has been wasted on stupidity and owner and player greeeeeeed.

  78. lionglass says: May 15, 2011 2:52 AM

    Firstly, hlmatty1, it was De Smith who claimed two violations of the “law”, not this site.

    Secondly, there ARE laws governing business contracts such as CBAs, that is why they are in court!

    A violation of a legally binding contract can be construed as a violation of the law.

  79. cax20 says: May 15, 2011 3:14 AM

    The NFL is doing illegal activities.

    The draft, the salary cap, the tags, rookie slotting. All that stuff is clearly collusion.

    It’s a ridiculous thought that when I graduated from college, I was told the only place I could work was business X and i was only going to be paid Y amount of money.

    Despite this, all this stuff works great for the NFL’s 32 businesses. We clearly love the way the league works right now.

    It really seems evident to me that De Smith and the players want as high a percentage of the business that they can take, and are using these trust laws as a gun to the league’s head.

    It is also evident that these players care less about the players who have come before than the league does. They also care less about the players who have yet to come. The owners are the true caretakers of the league and the players don’t care if they destroy it, wanting theirs, and now.

  80. anthonyfromstatenisland says: May 15, 2011 4:59 AM

    wigwam: The way that will turn out is that the NFL will adopt the “A” and “B” league format commonly seen in European soccer leagues, and at the end of each season, the bottom few teams from the former will be relegated to the latter, to be replaced by the latter’s top finishers, who get promoted.

    Otherwise, point spreads on NFL games will be so large that sooner or later the kind of point-shaving scandal that almost destroyed college basketball 60 years ago would surely happen.

  81. billinlouisiana says: May 15, 2011 7:39 AM

    cax20 says:
    May 15, 2011 3:14 AM
    The NFL is doing illegal activities.

    The draft, the salary cap, the tags, rookie slotting. All that stuff is clearly collusion.

    It’s a ridiculous thought that when I graduated from college, I was told the only place I could work was business X and i was only going to be paid Y amount of money.

    ————————————————-

    That all took place while they were working under a CBA and thus they were legal at that time.

  82. jsgreene828 says: May 15, 2011 8:29 AM

    The biggest concern I have over the labor disagreement is with the lack of coverage for the players revenue sharing plan. The players are demanding 60% of the GROSS profits, not the net profits. Being a business owner myself, I know that if I were to lose 60% of the my gross, I would be in bankruptcy within a year. The NFL owners have a large enough corporation to spread such losses out over 5-7 years. The players and NFLPA need to wise up and realize what it takes to run a business. The lack of coverage on this issue may be due to there being so few business owners out there. Let me know what you think.

  83. stanklepoot says: May 15, 2011 8:47 AM

    oldbyrd says: May 14, 2011 3:58 PM

    It makes me sick to have see this minature commie shoot his mouth off. He is a idiot. Terribly under qualified and far over his head in this matter. I think even the NFLPA sees this now. If I were the owners, I would just sit it out and watch the( can’t do anything else boys )come a runnin. After all the years these guys play, 80% retire broke. That’s a fact. Does this not tell you something about the intelligence of the NFLPA? How can you retire broke when you make millions? Get back to work employees.
    ________________________
    To paraphrase The Princess Bride, when it comes to the word “commie”, I don’t think that word means what you think it does. You can call Smith a lot of things, but commie is not one of them. He was a litigation attorney for a major firm, and now he represents the players in their business dealings with the NFL. What’s the one constant in all of that? He’s trying to get paid, big time. Supporting the players is not the equivalent of supporting some communist ideal of the masses existing in a state of equal means and resources (like that ever happened in a communist nation anyway), it’s representing one party in a multi-billion dollar negotiation with another party. You don’t see smith saying all players should receive the same salary do you? So, in the name of all that’s holy, if you’re going to start throwing out words like “commie” at least have some clue as to what they actually mean. The players and their reps are no more commies than the owners are fascists (which is to say not at all). There are no good guys and bad guys here. There are simply two parties negotiating how they will split up the revenue that they create by working together.

  84. stanklepoot says: May 15, 2011 9:03 AM

    mikeb4u says: May 15, 2011 2:25 AM

    The best that the players could do is get rid of D Smith.

    What needs to be done is to dismiss the law suits, and get back to the bargaining table. The owners have their last offer, and the NFLPA needs to submit their offer of a CBA. Then sit down to BINDING arbitration and–LETS PLAY FOOTYBALL. Enough time has been wasted on stupidity and owner and player greeeeeeed.
    ________________________
    Except that the players have no reason to dismiss Smith right now. No matter how much you (and certainly the owners) might dislike him, so far his tactics are working, and the owners are stuck playing defense in the courts. Furthermore, if the players simply dismissed the lawsuits, they’d be throwing away whatever leverage they have in negotiations. The owners strategy is simple: war of attrition. In other words, lock the players out and deny them income until they cave to all of the owners demands (which will simply reverse the tables and leave the players stuck with a deal they think is worse than the owners thought the previous CBA was, meaning we’ll just end up back in the same place again).

    Nelson’s injunction, if it survives appeal, will mean that players can keep playing and getting paid while negotiations continue. That means that the players won’t feel forced into accepting a deal they believe is unfair. Additionally, Doty’s ruling on damages in the lockout insurance case could end up not only denying the owners the lockout war chest they were hoping for, but providing the players with a lockout war chest of their own. That, in and of itself, could give the players the wherewithal to hold out for a better deal.

    As for binding arbitration, I’d love to see it. Personally, I don’t care which side gets what percentage of the revenue. The odds of that happening any time soon, however, are rather slim (unless ordered by a judge). The players see hope in litigation, so why give up complete control of the process when things are finally looking winnable? As for the owners, they really don’t seem like the type to give up final say over the issue. They’re too used to getting their own way to give an arbitrator the power to force a CBA they might not really like. Now, once a new CBA is reached, they would love to have any disputes handled by an arbitrator (as opposed to the federal court in Minnesota).

  85. jc1958cool says: May 15, 2011 9:30 AM

    the players offered a 9% paycut, the owners say that’s not enough and lock them out! there is an agreement, the owners didn’t like it and opted out! all you owner lovers are retards

  86. realdeal12 says: May 15, 2011 9:55 AM

    Dmouth just like to stir the pot. He has gotten in the players heads all these ideas about how evil the owners are. They just keep following. The longer this goes on the worse the outcome will be. Don’t bite the hand that feeds you and never crap where you eat.

  87. mick730 says: May 15, 2011 10:09 AM

    “It’s a ridiculous thought that when I graduated from college, I was told the only place I could work was business X and i was only going to be paid Y amount of money. ”

    You can’t be that stupid, can you? When a potential NFL player is drafted in the NFL draft, they do not have to go play football. Do you understand that? They have, or would have, as many opportunities as any other college graduate in the American economy. They can look for a job in the Midwest, the Northeast, the South or on the West Coast. They can look for a job with any company in any place. They can choose the job that pays the best salary, or offers the best benefits, or has the nicest people, or is located in the geographical place of their choosing.

    Nobody makes any college student choose the NFL. They don’t have to play football just because they were drafted.

    The do so for a number of reasons:

    1. The average NFL player never earned his degree in college even though almost all of them never had to pay dime for their tutition, their room and board, or even for their own books.

    2. The average salary of a 1st year NFL player, a rookie, is so much higher than any salary that could be earned by any college graduate with even the most specialized and advanced degree. In short, they go into the NFL because of the extraordinary amount of money they can make.

    3. A career in the NFL, as the union keeps telling us, is a very short one. It is not a profession for most of these guys. They don’t plan for their future and think of nothing other than how much money they can get while they play football; which is cool, but there is a reason that 78% of NFL players file for personal bankruptcy two years after they no longer play football.

    So NFL players union supporters, please stop trying to make out that the NFL players are suffering any kind of hardship; from the draft to being traded to earning millions of dollars for a part time job; none of it is a hardship.

    It isn’t slavery. Also a stint in pro football should not mean that one never has to work again a day in his life. It also does not mean that the NFL must provide you with free health insurance for the rest of your life.

    The NFL is a very specialized and uniquie niche in the American economy. In return for making hundreds of times more as a NFL player, the poor dears must submit to being drafted, to possibly being traded and even to possibly being cut before they have to face the real world and the real economy.

    What horrors.

  88. giboxer5 says: May 15, 2011 10:20 AM

    jc1958cool , LMFAO. Go learn to read. Then actually catch up on the reality of the situation. I love when slow people show their IQ for all to laugh at!! RETARD

  89. giboxer5 says: May 15, 2011 10:25 AM

    It is hilarious how many people posting on here have no idea what so ever about what is actually going on.. Do you idiots actually read the stories before posting? Ever heard of this story before right now or is this your first time? Why is it expecting to much to come onto a forum after an article and expect, at the very least, the members to have actually read the story and be able to speak like you actually have a clue. I love an intelligent debate, there is little of that going on here..

  90. cax20 says: May 15, 2011 12:06 PM

    @billinlouisiana:
    “That all took place while they were working under a CBA and thus they were legal at that time.”

    the 2011 draft took place outside the CBA and the existence of a union. the existing tags exist outside the CBA and the existence of a union.

    I’m not saying that the draft or tags are bad, quite the contrary. but they are most definately illegal.

    @mick730:
    of course one could say that i don’t HAVE to work in the tech field. that being smart enough to be a engineer isn’t a right, its a privilege. that being able to do high level math makes me entitled. oh, and did i mention the pay is higher than say, working in a factory or some such. So I’m being greedy.

    I also worry that you didn’t read my entire post, because you are acting as if I posted some strongly pro-player perspective. there was stuff in there about the league being the caretakers of the game we love.

  91. CKL says: May 15, 2011 12:12 PM

    jbcommonsense says:
    May 15, 2011 12:44 AM
    Polls show that a majority of football fans primarily blame the owners for the lockout endangering football. It’s obvious that PFT was right about bored, resentful league employees are flooding post here.

    Here’s a direct message to all of you: I hope your owner employers decide that the next best method of saving money is to axe some you dutiful peon gophers. Then you can stop looking down your noses at worker’s rights.
    _________________________________
    Guess what? I WAS “just a peon” who was axed in a buyout by hideously competent ownership (the man who helped make our co what it was died and his moron family took over). You know what? I still think it was their right to do that-sell the company and make money since they didn’t want us anymore. They just should have treated us better while doing so. I had absolutely positively no “RIGHT” to a job…even though I was a consistently highly rated worker there who loved my job. Too many things now are seen as “RIGHTS” with little “responsibility” required of the party screaming about their RIGHTS.

    Love the guy whining that we should all hate rich people….then saying we are jealous of the players. That dude has severe and terminal hypocrisy-osis.”

    I’ve never been anything but middle class. I don’t hate or like anyone or judge them based on their bank account. I judge them based on their words and more importantly their deeds. I’ve seen very greedy and selfish people who don’t have a pot to piss in and rich people who were salt of the earth. What’s that old saying? Something like “you are you regardless of money, you just become more of what you already were”? I forget who said that originally but it’s true from what I have observed.

    I think most people who are “pro owner” aren’t really saying they LOVE the owners…they are in favor of what the owners stand for, the owners position, their ability to took to the long term future of the game if only for “selfish” motives like profit. Personally I think that owners are like the players, some good people some turds. Liking or disliking them personally has nothing to do with whose side I am on (I think they both have good and bad points) nor should it if one wants to be objective. The overwhelming love for me is THE GAME…not any player or owner.

  92. jbcommonsense says: May 15, 2011 12:55 PM

    CKL, of course NFL players are not entitled to their jobs — they win them through incredibly difficult athletic competition.

    What the players ARE entitled to is to collectively bargain for a fair share of the profits. Check out the salaries players in the NBA make, with far less risk to their bodies.

    What owners ARE NOT entitled to is a rapid growth rate in their profits. The owners are making great profits now on a relatively simple, investment with practically NO risk. That’s probably why they refuse to open their books.

    People here have tried to make the argument that the owners position is about the sustainability of the game. How so? Both sides have agreed to a team salary cap — http://nfllabor.com/2011/03/11/exclusive-summary-of-nfl-proposal-to-nflpa/

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