League finds no improper lockout contact

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Last week, Mike Freeman of CBSSports.com reported that players and assistant coaches routinely have been in contact, estimating that 25 percent of all teams are breaking the rules prohibiting contact during the lockout.  Later in the week, Rodney Harrison told PFT Live that he knows players and coaches are talking.

In response to Freeman’s report, the league said it would look into the matter.  And the league has looked into the matter.

And the league has found no improprieties.

Not at this point,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told Clark Judge of CBSSports.com.  “It’s not an investigation, per se.  We’re monitoring what’s taken place and follow up on various reports, then follow up on any specific information.”

We’re not quite sure what that means.  But we are sure that the NFL realizes that it would be unfair to pluck one sacrificial lamb from the barn when they’ve all got dirt on their wool.  Unless a team admits it or gets reckless with the communications, it simply wouldn’t be fair to launch an investigation that uncovers one violation without engaging in a similar violation as to every other team, and without punishing every team that is guilty.

The league gains nothing from having such information make it into the media, especially during the lockout.  So, as Aiello said, it’s “not an investigation, per se.”  Indeed, it’s not an investigation, at all.

24 responses to “League finds no improper lockout contact

  1. If they would collectively bargain and reach an agreement to split $9 billion + in revenues (I think 9 yr olds could do it) then they wouldn’t have to worry about stupid stuff like this…this lockout is pitiful and embarrassing…Fo’ Real!

  2. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told Clark Judge of CBSSports.com. “It’s not an investigation, per se.”

    Having said that, Aiello returned his head to it’s normal resting place in the fissure just beneath his lower back.

  3. The league should have the replay officials from the Detroit vs Chicago game audit team compliance.

    I’m sure they’ll find something.

  4. Yea, RIGHT. They’re all cheating. So the best alternative is to say that they found no wrong doing.

  5. “We’re not quite sure what that means. But we are sure that the NFL realizes that it would be unfair to pluck one sacrificial lamb from the barn when they’ve all got dirt on their wool.”

    Pretty much. As long as it’s not brazen, ownership is more interested in squeezing the NFLPA* and less interested in ensuring bad football in the fall.

    Goddarn, I’m cynical.

  6. Did anyone really think the league would find any improper conduct? They would have to fire every coach on every team. We all know that’s not going to happen.

  7. “But we are sure that the NFL realizes that it would be unfair to pluck one sacrificial lamb from the barn when they’ve all got dirt on their wool. ”

    LOL….yeah right. Just like most of the “experts” said that Detroit wouldn’t be found guilty and penalized for tampering because NOBODY ever gets busted for that even though the league knows it goes on all the time. ANNNND what happened? Detroit got penalized for it……..there’s a sacrificial lamb for you!

  8. I volunteer to visit various industrial sites in my area to photograph a variety of locked gates so you can switch up your “lockout” photos more often.

  9. Shocking! After I investigated myself, I found that I never break the speed limit or fail to report money I find laying in the streets.

  10. “The league gains nothing from having such information make it into the media, especially during the lockout. So, as Aiello said, it’s “not an investigation, per se.” Indeed, it’s not an investigation, at all.”

    Instead of the pic of the lock and chains, you should have used a pic of the 3 monkeys, see no evil, hear no evil and speak no evil…

  11. The league knows that contact between coaches and players will divide the NFLPA. Coaches will get more players revved up to play.

    No surprise the NFL isn’t enforcing contact rules strictly.

  12. “No inappropriate contact” after the players swore they were just trying to “get back on the tit” for the purposes of replenishment rather than sexual gratification.

  13. When pressed to define what would constitute improper contact between team staff and a player, an unnamed league insider responded by evoking the horrifying imagery of the dry humping Rashard Mendenhall put on Big Ben in the AFC championship game last season.

    The insider added that what Mendenhall did was not only improper, but pretty freaky, too.

  14. So how much money did all the lawyers for each side cost? How much money is THAT? I bet it’s not peanuts.

    If both sides are so worried about money and who gets how much, why is NOBODY concerened about how much the lawyers are getting for doing all this? I’d like to see that number in the end.

    Free money if you could sort it out yourselves..

    I’d like to sign up for some of that free money you guys are handing out. Ya know.. since I’m not a player or an owner that shouldn’t be a problem right?

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