Lurie: Evaluating Plaxico would be similar to evaluating Vick

AP

Although the Eagles aren’t coming right out and saying they’re interested in signing Plaxico Burress, owner Jeffrey Lurie talked generally about the possibility, saying that deciding to sign Burress shortly after his release from prison would require a process much like the team went through before deciding to sign Michael Vick shortly after his release from prison.

It would be similar,” Lurie said, per Philly.com. “Any player, if there’s issues off the field, we have to ascertain . . . are they going to represent the Eagles and the community that we serve? Are they going to be part of events like this? Michael has shown this. If a player is not willing to be part of the culture we have, then I don’t think it’s a good fit.”

Although Burress and Vick are obviously similar in the sense that they’re NFL players who missed two seasons while in prison, Lurie said that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick doesn’t necessarily make them more interested in Burress.

“We evaluate case by case. It involved a lot of research into Michael — what kind of teammate he was. What his motivations were. How much he cared for the game,” Lurie said. “We’ve shown we’ll take chances if it’s warranted.”

Lurie says that until the lockout ends and teams can sit down and talk to free agents, there’s not a whole lot the Eagles can do in their assessment of Burress.

“You can evaluate his talent,” Lurie said. “You can evaluate his age. But you can’t evaluate where his heart and his head are at the moment.”

But once the lockout ends, Lurie sounds like he wants to find out where Burress’s heart and head are. And if they’re in the right place, Burress may be in Philadelphia.

16 responses to “Lurie: Evaluating Plaxico would be similar to evaluating Vick

  1. Sorry, Jeff, but you failed the evaluation of Bad Newz MISERABLY-

    Unless you intended to hire a no-character, STD spreading sociopathic highlight reel loser all along.

  2. Vick:

    #1 Vick repeatedly did something that was horrific in the general publics eyes, tried to hide it, and was making money off of it.

    #1a hes a QB theres alot more thought process at that position.

    Plaxico:
    #1: what he did was just plain stupid and it was a one time thing.

    #1a: how does a receiver evaluate mentally like a QB?

  3. I think it speaks volumes to how unbalanced our judicial system is. Vick and Burress receiving roughly the same sentence/time in jail, when in my opinion Vick’s crime was much, much dispicable.

  4. How are they similar? One dude shot himself in the leg. The other dude systematically murdered dogs, and had an elaborate alter lifestyle setup to hide these acts.

    To even remotely place these two in the same category is a huge insult to Plaxico.

  5. “And if they’re in the right place, Burress may be in Philadelphia.”

    Yep, and if not he won’t.
    That is some brilliant analysis there!!

  6. Burress wasn’t exactly a humanitarian who practiced hard and put the team before himself before prison.

    I’m not sure why anyone would think that after two years of inactivity in a prison setting he’d become a different person.

    For a low salary with incentives he’d be worth it to a bad team that would view the gawk factor – the attention they’d get from fans just waiting for Burress to implode – as a positive.

  7. kspl1 says: The eagles need a tall receiver. I hope we sign him
    *****************************

    We already have Riley Cooper. 6’3″ is tall enough, and Cooper has never shot himself!

  8. Plax deserves a second chance to prove everyone either right or wrong. He did his time. We did it with Vick why not with Plax. Give him a chance.

    E-A-G-L-E-S!!!!!

  9. ChapNastier,

    The only thing HUGE in your brilliant analysis is the discrepancy in your judgement. Age has nothing to do with it. He was 27 when he was convicted. 22 when he started. Young would be mid teens, not a grown a$$ adult man. If he is old enough to accept a 10 year – $130 million dollar contract extension at the age of 24, he is old enough to know better about running, lying about it, trying to hide a dog fighting operation.

    I simply can not comprehend why people defend this guy’s guilty actions. Hey, feel free to cheer him on for his ressurected career. Be happy as hell when he wins you a fantasy or actual football game… but the nerve of some people to justify his crime (because of his upbringing) or downplay it due to his age makes me sick to my stomach.

  10. @ lucky

    I am using their age to compare their value to an NFL team when they got out of prison. I am not defending either of their actions my friend.

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