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Whisenhunt sees Pat Tillman jerseys while visiting troops

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Cardinals coach Ken Whisenhunt, one of several coaches visiting U.S. troops in the Middle East, has provided a first-person account of his experiences to the team’s official website.  One experience seems particularly appropriate, especially as we prepare to celebrate the anniversary of our nation’s birth — and as we remember once again the sacrifices made by thousands of men and women to secure and preserve the freedoms we enjoy.

“I’ve had a couple of guys bring up Pat Tillman jerseys and want those signed and it’s cool,” Whisenhunt writes.  “I’ve had one guy who told me he trained Pat Tillman when he came over here.  That makes you think about how much Pat meant to so many people.  That’s been special.”

Tillman quit football after 9/11 and joined the military.  He was killed by friendly fire in April 2004.

Whisehunt also explains a “zero gravity” experience in a C-130, and riding in a helicopter as it avoided the Red Zone, which has an entirely different meaning in matters of war than it does in football.

Kudos once again to Whisenhunt, Texans coach Gary Kubiak, and the father-son Jim Moras for devoting their time, and taking a fairly significant risk, for those who currently serve.

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18 Responses to “Whisenhunt sees Pat Tillman jerseys while visiting troops”
  1. redskinsrt says: Jul 3, 2011 11:25 PM

    The Tillman story is a dark window into what really goes on within our military and government.

    No tin foil hat crew here, just truth.

  2. warner2fitz says: Jul 3, 2011 11:33 PM

    I wear my Tillman jersey proudly & 2morrow will think of him & thank all of the veterans who allow me and my family the freedoms we have been given by them.

  3. cw3214 says: Jul 3, 2011 11:49 PM

    You forgot to add that the military disgraced Pat Tillman’s legacy by lying to his family regarding the circumstances of his death.

  4. facebookuser111 says: Jul 4, 2011 1:20 AM

    And to clarify what I meant is there are no good or appropriate even in the ‘he went there’ jokes about the Tillman situation.

  5. paulbrownsrevenge says: Jul 4, 2011 1:30 AM

    I still stink this guy needs to be of the cover of Madden or NCAA. A good role model for kids.

  6. cavredleg15 says: Jul 4, 2011 2:15 AM

    As a member of the Military I would like to see the term Friendly Fire make a quick exit. Fratricide is the correct term. There is nothing friendly in what Pat Tillman endured.

  7. jasku880 says: Jul 4, 2011 7:39 AM

    God bless America! Happy 4th of July everyone!

  8. pappysarcasm says: Jul 4, 2011 8:13 AM

    oops..wrong post. Please move to top ten!

    Absolutely agree on the Wisnehunt/Kubial/Moroa/ Well Done Gents!

  9. MichaelEdits says: Jul 4, 2011 8:28 AM

    Yeah. And have a great holiday, everybody.

  10. phillyfinsfan says: Jul 4, 2011 8:29 AM

    Guys like Pat Tillman still exist in the NFL. It’s a shame that their great character and charitable work are overshadowed by these selfish punks who get into trouble because they have a ten cent brain to go with their million dollar talent.

  11. knightringonow says: Jul 4, 2011 11:30 AM

    Mike-

    When you write, “Kudos once again to Whisenhunt, Texans coach Gary Kubiak, and the father-son Jim Moras for devoting their time, and taking a fairly significant risk, for those who currently serve.

    you might want to also give kudos to THOSE WHO SERVE!

  12. radiodujour says: Jul 4, 2011 11:39 AM

    Go to youtube and search for “Pat Tillman Trailer” and watch the video. Then download/rent the movie. Its my opinion that Pat was killed because he saw too much and was going to talk about it. Watch and see what you think.

  13. pigeonpea says: Jul 4, 2011 2:29 PM

    Despite the White House lying about the circumstances of Tillman’s death, or the alleged conspiracies the lunatic fringe dream up to explain “why” he died, Pat Tillman was an exceptional role model and true patriot who gave his life in the service of duty to the country he loved and believed in.

    Put your partisan BS aside and seriously think about that for a minute.

  14. darthhitman says: Jul 4, 2011 3:54 PM

    He was shot from within 10′ as he signed on to hunt terrorists responsible for attacking his country on 9/11 NOT babysit the Afghanistan poppy fields for the CIA and the federal government’s opium trade. They couldn’t allow him, considering his position in the public eye, come back state side and call it like it is. If I’m wrong, why the run around with his family and cover up after cover up? “Truth” fears no investigation and it needs no cover up

  15. bennyblanco99 says: Jul 4, 2011 3:58 PM

    I played against Pat Tillman when he was a Sr at LeLand High in San Jose… I followed him at ASU and watched him become a starter in the NFL. I remember when he quit football to join the Rangers after 9/11… And I remember exactly where I was when I first heard the tragic news of his untimely death. 1st Guniness is for you today brotha =) and a SINCERE THANK YOU to all the men and woman who put their life on the line for our freedom!!! Time to BBQ!!!

  16. pigeonpea says: Jul 4, 2011 4:35 PM

    darthhitman says:
    He was shot from within 10′ as he signed on to hunt terrorists responsible for attacking his country on 9/11 NOT babysit the Afghanistan poppy fields for the CIA and the federal government’s opium trade. They couldn’t allow him, considering his position in the public eye, come back state side and call it like it is. If I’m wrong, why the run around with his family and cover up after cover up?

    Gee… Maybe because a guy who gave up a $2 million a year NFL contract to join the U.S. Rangers makes a great story to inspire other Americans to join the service? It sure as heck sounds better when one believed he died in combat with the enemy, and not by one of his own (not that lessens his sacrifice, by any means).

    If you honestly believe all that the U.S. military is doing in Afghanistan is playing security for the “CIA and federal government’s opium trade” and that these hundreds of soldiers are maintaining a complete code of silence about it to the point they had to kill Tillman to keep it that way, I have some oceanfront property in Kentucky you may be interested in buying.

  17. jimmylions says: Jul 4, 2011 9:57 PM

    Pat Tillman’s fratricide death was the result of lack of discipline and training. It was not an assassination.

    The effort to pervert Pat’s death into a recruiting tool for Bush’s Iraq war isn’t a conspiracy theory – the conspiracy is a fact. It also exposes that no one who served in the Bush White House, gives a damn about the men and women who serve in the military.

    Pat Tillman’s heroic and selfless reasons for become a Ranger aren’t typical. Most of the guys in the Rangers, by their own admission, are there because they want to shoot things and blow up things. The kid who killed Pat wasn’t an assassin, he was just an undisciplined soldier who made a massive mistake.

    The soldier who killed Pat stated that he just wanted to get into a firefight. By his own admission he shot Pat, nearly decapitated him, just because he was bored and wanted to shoot someone. He didn’t know it was a friendly, and ignored the rules of field combat that (had he followed) would have stopped him from shooting a fellow Ranger.

    This kind of trigger happy, gung-ho mentality isn’t that uncommon among the young Rangers. Also, fratricide deaths like Pat’s aren’t that uncommon. Also, the way the military lied to the Tillman family is standard procedure, and usually works to cover up the truth. What the military and the Bush White House didn’t count on Pat’s family refusing to accept a bs story.

    The behavior that followed Pat Tillman’s death, the actions by Donald Rumsfeld, the Bush administration, and also the NFL, was shameful, sick, and completely inexcusable.

    When it finally came out that Pat’s death was fratricide, and that Pat was a liberal who thought President Bush was a war criminal, the initial response of the NFL was to distance itself from Pat Tillman.

    On Memorial Day, 2005, when the NFL Network was talking about players who had served in the military, Pat Tillman’s name was not mentioned.

    After helping the Bush administration conspire to use Pat Tillman as a recruiting tool for the military, the NFL turned its back on Pat Tillman. Apparently the league was too afraid of the controversy created by Pat’s parents when they demanded to know the truth.

    Be sure to remind Rich Eisen about that the next time you see him.

  18. jimmylions says: Jul 4, 2011 9:59 PM

    One more thing … Pat isn’t in heaven. He’s dead.

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