New CBA has protections for career-ending injuries

AP

One item in the new CBA that has slipped below the radar over the last few days was uncovered by Peter King of SI.com: Players that suffer career-ending injuries will have more protection.

In the past, a rookie that suffered a career-ending injury during the regular season could keep his first-year salary and signing bonus.  Under the new rules, players can get $1.5 million maximum in injury protection.

So if the rest of the rookie’s contract in years two-through-four totaled more than $1.5 million, he would get $1.5 million.  If the remainder of the rookie’s contract was less than $1.5 million, he would get all the money due to him.

That’s a nice added wrinkle which will help players that need long-term help.

12 responses to “New CBA has protections for career-ending injuries

  1. Not a bad deal, if the player is intelligent. If someone handed me a million and a half dollars, plus the hundreds of thousands, if not millions from my salary + signing bonus, I could probably live pretty comfortably the rest of my life without working. If you can get a 5% return on $2M, thats $100K a year in interest alone. If you bought a $350-400K house cash, and had no debt, you’d be pretty ballin with $100K a year.

  2. My question, how would the cap be impacted by this? Would the remaining years paid out be protected from being included in the salary cap?

    @bleedgreen – you need to read this more closely. The players don’t get a $1.5M payout, plus their salary. They get $1.5M maximum. Some players may get far less (imagine a UDFA making rookie minimum for three years with no bonus).

  3. @bleedgreen

    You ever heard of taxes agents and attorney fees? Now, how much do you have to live on for the rest of your life? What a dumb azz.

  4. Is it just me or does it seem like this sentence by Rosenthal was reversed?

    “So if the rest of the rookie’s contract in years two-through-four totaled more than $1.5 million, he would get $1.5 million. If the remainder of the rookie’s contract was less than $1.5 million, he would get all the money due to him.”

    That’s saying that the player would get the lesser of the two amounts… shouldn’t he be getting no less than $1.5 million?

  5. @KIR

    I’m pretty sure you don’t have to pay an agent a fee for an injury related insurance settlement. And lawyers fees for an injury settlement should be provided by the Union.

    If you’re gross is 2 million, and you’re going to pay taxes on it no matter what, you still end up with over a million dollars. If its invested properly and you live within your means, you should be able to live the rest of your life.

    Of course most people here would get a million bucks and immediately go buy a Bentley and party like its going out of style, so I wouldn’t expect anyone to really understand how to live an extended period of time on a lump sum of cash.

  6. Or you could just have a great owner like Robert Kraft, who took care of Robert Edwards after a career ending, off seaon injury.

  7. the 1.5 million is the MAX.
    A player could have 3 million remaining on his deal, but he would only get 1.5.
    if he was to make 750,000, he wouldn’t get any more then that, but would be paid off.

  8. @ sanjose61

    If a rookie gets injured in year 1, he keeps his year 1 salary AND signing bonus.

    THEN, if years 2-4 of his rookie contract total MORE than $1.5 million (say $2M), then he’ll only get $1.5 million as protection (losing out on $500K).

    If years 2-4 of his rookie contract total LESS than $1.5 million (say $1M) , then he’ll get that full $1M.

    Meaning the most he’d get as protection for career ending injury is $1.5M. Before, they got nothing. So, it is a better deal for the players.

  9. From MMQB

    “Guaranteed contracts for injury. This went over everyone’s heads all weekend. Let’s say a player signs a three-year, $6-million contract with a $2-million bonus and salaries of $1.1 million, $1.3 million and $1.6 million. And say he gets a career-ending injury in game five of the first season. He keeps his bonus. He keeps his first-year salary. That’s normal. Now he’d get to keep $1 million of his year-two salary and $500,000 of year three. In the old days, he’d have been able to keep the bonus and year-one salary, a total of $3.1 million. Now he’d be able to pocket $4.6 million because of the maximum of $1.5 million in injury-protection money.”

    Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/peter_king/07/24/labor/index.html#ixzz1T89XDMzy

    I trust the way he breaks it down.

  10. @bleedgreen

    I’m pretty sure you don’t have to pay an agent a fee for an injury related insurance settlement. And lawyers fees for an injury settlement should be provided by the Union.
    ____________________________

    Wrong again my clueless friend. Those agents fees are earned when the rookie contract is first negotiated. Obviously, you’ve never been around money.

  11. @bcgreg and dcbassguy,

    Thanks.

    I see it was explained much better in the SI/Peter King link.

Leave a Reply