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New CBA has protections for career-ending injuries

Mike Tolbert AP

One item in the new CBA that has slipped below the radar over the last few days was uncovered by Peter King of SI.com: Players that suffer career-ending injuries will have more protection.

In the past, a rookie that suffered a career-ending injury during the regular season could keep his first-year salary and signing bonus.  Under the new rules, players can get $1.5 million maximum in injury protection.

So if the rest of the rookie’s contract in years two-through-four totaled more than $1.5 million, he would get $1.5 million.  If the remainder of the rookie’s contract was less than $1.5 million, he would get all the money due to him.

That’s a nice added wrinkle which will help players that need long-term help.

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12 Responses to “New CBA has protections for career-ending injuries”
  1. jimmysee says: Jul 25, 2011 9:46 AM

    Probably covered by an insurance policy taken by each owner.

  2. bleedgreen says: Jul 25, 2011 9:47 AM

    Not a bad deal, if the player is intelligent. If someone handed me a million and a half dollars, plus the hundreds of thousands, if not millions from my salary + signing bonus, I could probably live pretty comfortably the rest of my life without working. If you can get a 5% return on $2M, thats $100K a year in interest alone. If you bought a $350-400K house cash, and had no debt, you’d be pretty ballin with $100K a year.

  3. m2karateman says: Jul 25, 2011 10:23 AM

    My question, how would the cap be impacted by this? Would the remaining years paid out be protected from being included in the salary cap?

    @bleedgreen – you need to read this more closely. The players don’t get a $1.5M payout, plus their salary. They get $1.5M maximum. Some players may get far less (imagine a UDFA making rookie minimum for three years with no bonus).

  4. KIR says: Jul 25, 2011 10:24 AM

    @bleedgreen

    You ever heard of taxes agents and attorney fees? Now, how much do you have to live on for the rest of your life? What a dumb azz.

  5. sanjose61 says: Jul 25, 2011 10:34 AM

    Is it just me or does it seem like this sentence by Rosenthal was reversed?

    “So if the rest of the rookie’s contract in years two-through-four totaled more than $1.5 million, he would get $1.5 million. If the remainder of the rookie’s contract was less than $1.5 million, he would get all the money due to him.”

    That’s saying that the player would get the lesser of the two amounts… shouldn’t he be getting no less than $1.5 million?

  6. bleedgreen says: Jul 25, 2011 10:57 AM

    @KIR

    I’m pretty sure you don’t have to pay an agent a fee for an injury related insurance settlement. And lawyers fees for an injury settlement should be provided by the Union.

    If you’re gross is 2 million, and you’re going to pay taxes on it no matter what, you still end up with over a million dollars. If its invested properly and you live within your means, you should be able to live the rest of your life.

    Of course most people here would get a million bucks and immediately go buy a Bentley and party like its going out of style, so I wouldn’t expect anyone to really understand how to live an extended period of time on a lump sum of cash.

  7. bcgreg says: Jul 25, 2011 11:03 AM

    Or you could just have a great owner like Robert Kraft, who took care of Robert Edwards after a career ending, off seaon injury.

  8. thetooloftools says: Jul 25, 2011 11:04 AM

    the 1.5 million is the MAX.
    A player could have 3 million remaining on his deal, but he would only get 1.5.
    if he was to make 750,000, he wouldn’t get any more then that, but would be paid off.

  9. bcgreg says: Jul 25, 2011 11:08 AM

    @ sanjose61

    If a rookie gets injured in year 1, he keeps his year 1 salary AND signing bonus.

    THEN, if years 2-4 of his rookie contract total MORE than $1.5 million (say $2M), then he’ll only get $1.5 million as protection (losing out on $500K).

    If years 2-4 of his rookie contract total LESS than $1.5 million (say $1M) , then he’ll get that full $1M.

    Meaning the most he’d get as protection for career ending injury is $1.5M. Before, they got nothing. So, it is a better deal for the players.

  10. dcbassguy says: Jul 25, 2011 11:21 AM

    From MMQB

    “Guaranteed contracts for injury. This went over everyone’s heads all weekend. Let’s say a player signs a three-year, $6-million contract with a $2-million bonus and salaries of $1.1 million, $1.3 million and $1.6 million. And say he gets a career-ending injury in game five of the first season. He keeps his bonus. He keeps his first-year salary. That’s normal. Now he’d get to keep $1 million of his year-two salary and $500,000 of year three. In the old days, he’d have been able to keep the bonus and year-one salary, a total of $3.1 million. Now he’d be able to pocket $4.6 million because of the maximum of $1.5 million in injury-protection money.”

    Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/peter_king/07/24/labor/index.html#ixzz1T89XDMzy

    I trust the way he breaks it down.

  11. KIR says: Jul 25, 2011 12:17 PM

    @bleedgreen

    I’m pretty sure you don’t have to pay an agent a fee for an injury related insurance settlement. And lawyers fees for an injury settlement should be provided by the Union.
    ____________________________

    Wrong again my clueless friend. Those agents fees are earned when the rookie contract is first negotiated. Obviously, you’ve never been around money.

  12. sanjose61 says: Jul 25, 2011 5:49 PM

    @bcgreg and dcbassguy,

    Thanks.

    I see it was explained much better in the SI/Peter King link.

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