Jason Garrett bans rookie hazing in Dallas

AP

Cowboys coach Jason Garrett is telling his veteran players to treat rookies as equals.

Garrett has joined Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio in banning rookie hazing from training camp.

“It’s just something I believe in and we believe in as a staff,” Garrett said, via Tim MacMahon of ESPNDallas.com. “The young guys are part of our football team. They certainly need to get themselves acclimated in a lot of different ways, and our veteran players are in charge of welcoming them to the NFL in a real positive way. . . . There’s not going to be anything that’s demeaning in any way that a rookie has to do. We just don’t believe in that.”

Last year, a controversy began in Dallas when rookie receiver Dez Bryant refused to carry the pads of veteran receiver Roy Williams. This year, Cowboys rookies aren’t carrying veterans’ pads at training camp.

41 responses to “Jason Garrett bans rookie hazing in Dallas

  1. Wow, and the players are calling Goodell a pansy. No shoulder pads stacked high on someone’s shoulders, no people taped up for not performing, i’m sure that also means the rookies no longer are required to bring donuts, tub dunks, etc…. It’s not like people are rolling around hitting people with sacks of coins or broomsticking dudes.

  2. Ridiculous. Absolutely ridiculous. Hazing, though to the outside observer may appear cruel, helps build a sense of unity amongst members of an organization. “every guy here went through it,” helps the rookies endure the harmless, good natured ribbing their new teammates dish out. Jack del rio and jason garrett are pansies.

  3. Ridiculous. Absolutely ridiculous. Hazing, though to the outside observer may appear cruel, helps build a sense of unity amongst members of an organization.

    —–

    You are an idiot.

  4. Like hazing every truly hurt someone’s ability to play….I guess having a rookie sing his college theme song or run and get some fried chicken for the offensive lineman or something is just truly devastating to their potential…Hell, why stop there. Have the veterans hold their hands when they walk to practice…..

  5. The rookies in Dallas are too sensitive to get hazed. They wined to Jason Garret like a 5 year crying cause his big brother is being mean. So, Garrett had to give the veterans a stern talking to and told them to be nice to the young sensitive players.

  6. Jason Genius prefers instead to divide his lockerrom by only allowing select players wear the TEAM’s logo on their helmet.

  7. They have to say they won’t allow it or it looks like Bryant was getting special treatment. Which he was. he was being coddled, and still is.

  8. Good move. Wish all coaches would do this. Hazing mostly occurs in high school and these guys are suppose to be grown men. Let the rookies come in, learn the playbook/ pic some vets brain for some advice. Why make them set there focus on carrying others pads, or dancing and singing on tables?

    Time to grown up, and two teams have figured that out now.

  9. They have to say they won’t allow it or it looks like Bryant was getting special treatment. Which he was. he was being coddled, and still is.

    —————————————————————-

    So do you think they should have suspended him for refusing to carry Roy Williams’ shoulder pads?

  10. WOW!!! I agree with all these guys coming down on Garrett for his hazing stance. I mean really, why should anyone expect highly paid professionals to act like, well, how about highly paid professionals.

    I can see it all now. Fourth game of the season some veteran gets beat on his assignment and he goes to the press and says “You know if I had just been allowed to give our FA rookie Guard a bad haircut, we would have won that game.”

    Come on people. Humiliating others for your own amusement is not the path to team unity. It is an indication of insecurity.

  11. I see both sides of the argument.

    SOME forms of hazing can be used effectively in a team building exercise. Believe it or not, there are some things that can unify the players, make them closer, and therefore play more cohesive as a team. This has everything to do with breaking down a player, and then building him back up. The military does the same thing. These sorts of things are where EVERY one is included, things like all rookies getting a haircut, as a group exercise. Most players will agree it is harmless fun, and everyone laughs.

    The problem is too often people get carried away with making rookies “do” stuff. The Roy Williams incident is one example. That’s not about building “trust”, or showing any kind of veteran leadership, or anything of the sort. That is simply a veteran player showing his (undeserved in this case) ego, and trying to put a rookie down.

    Because players like RW entirely miss the point of bringing players together, and do stuff that actually divides them, hazing gets a bad rap.

    It’s entirely too arduous to make a list if “this is good/this is bad”, hazing is being phased out all together.

  12. Like hazing every truly hurt someone’s ability to play….I guess having a rookie sing his college theme song or run and get some fried chicken for the offensive lineman or something is just truly devastating to their potential…Hell, why stop there. Have the veterans hold their hands when they walk to practice…..

    —————————————————————

    Sean Taylor was temporarily blinded during a hazing incident when Lavar Arrington nailed him in the face with shaving cream pie. Missed practice time. Cam Cleeland was injured when he was hit in the face with a bag of coins as a rookie. Jeff Danish was thrown through a window and had to get a lot of stitches. A lot of people have been killed or severely injured, even sexually assaulted during hazing rituals. Maybe you should have read the linked article, where Garrett says “There are some things we won’t do. There are some other things that will still probably be in place. The more harmless things will still be in place.”

  13. Wow, hazing in the NFL?

    Yet another example of people using the broad structure of the English language to conjure up certain emotions and feelings.

    If you can walk away, say no and generally NOT HAVE to do an action or activity, that is NOT hazing.

    If Dez Bryant could just say NO and walk away, how the hell is that hazing? He wasn’t forced to do anything?!?!?!?

    What a joke

  14. Jason Genius prefers instead to divide his lockerrom by only allowing select players wear the TEAM’s logo on their helmet.

    —————————————————————

    Yeah… guys that have already earned a spot on the TEAM get to wear the TEAM’S logo. You have a problem with this exactly why?

  15. Hazing bad, shoplifting ok. Got it.

    ——————————————————————

    WTH does shoplifting have to do with anything?

  16. If you can walk away, say no and generally NOT HAVE to do an action or activity, that is NOT hazing.

    —————————————————————-

    So basically you’re saying that hazing really doesn’t exist?

  17. What all the haters and idiots don’t get is that Jason Garrett only wants one thing; his team to win the Superbowl.

    All he is doing is trying to remove all the distractions and getting the players to concentrate on football.

    How can a rookie concentrate on the practice field when he knows at any moment he can be grabbed, tied to the goal post, and have powder thrown in his face??? He can’t. He’ll always be looking over his shoulder, missing something that he needs to know.

    Not saying this is guaranteeing them a playoff win or anything, but it gives them a better chance to win if everyone is paying attention when they should be. If it was the Packer or Steelers who were in the SB last year; fine, do whatever you want. But the Cowboys need to get back on track. Don’t really see how this can be anything but positive for the franchise.

  18. And FYI…Garrett says it’s just the demeaning stuff he is nixing, such as the crazy haircuts.

  19. “Hazing” beyond the innocuous singing of one’s alma mater or paying for meals and other things of that nature should not be a part of professional sports. Especially stuff that might injure or demean others. It sends the wrong message to people who see these professionals as role models.

  20. Garrett is probably still upset that he had to carry aikmans purse as a rookie

    ——————————————————————

    Steve Young is upset because he could never carry Aikman’s jock!

  21. If I was a rookie and my coach banned hazing I would send a message to veterans that I dont believe I deserve any special treatment that they werent afforded when they entered the league by offering to carry their pads and by getting up and singing in front of the group. That will earn any in coming rookie whos coach has banned hazing a lot of respect.

    Hazing might be dumb but the fact that most NFL players had to do it is why I think rookies should continue the tradition. Just as an quick easy way to build camaraderie with their new teammates.

  22. Childress banned hazing his 1st year in MN and it was fine. The rookies still got hazed in creative ways without hurting them and bring about resentment.

  23. I can understand why they would do it this year, there is not enough time for horse play this year. Everyone needs to have there minds on playbooks. “We’ve not got time for you guys to be play’n grab ass out here”! If you haven’t herd that one you have been to very many football practices!LOL

  24. I agree…Hazing is childish and stupid. Veterans has had a way of entertaining themselves when rookies come in. Well no more. Rookies have enough to think about with learning the schemes,and making the team. They dont need this sideshow BS.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!