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Pryor reverses course, plans to appeal

Terrelle Pryor Workout Session Getty Images

On Thursday, agent Drew Rosenhaus told PFT that former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor won’t appeal the five-game suspension imposed by Commissioner Roger Goodell as, in essence, a favor to the NCAA.  Pryor’s lawyer, David Cornwell, is now singing a different tune.

Cornwell, who made a passionate case on Pryor’s behalf earlier this week on PFT Live, told ESPN Radio’s Mike & Mike in the Morning that Pryor eventually will appeal.

“[Commissioner Roger Goodell] indicated that we have the right to appeal within three days after Terrelle signs an NFL contract, and given some of the developments both in reaching the decision and comments out of the [NFL Players Association] regarding the decision, I think it’s likely that we will file an appeal, and give the Players Association an opportunity to make it’s objections to this on the record,” Cornwell said.

Even though the NFL insists that the decision to suspend Pryor, which arises from a vague and broad provision of the NFL Constitution and By-Laws, sets no precedent, players should be concerned — and that’s probably the ultimate reason for the appeal.  The NFL clearly wants to do right by the curators of its free farm system, and while there’s no “precedent” in a legal sense (indeed, the NFL would prefer not to be bound by past cases when considering the merits of new ones), the move represents the first attempt by the NFL to “help” the NCAA with the possibly unsolvable problem of enforcing inconsistently enforced rules with substandard resources and no real desire to ferret out every possible violation for fear that star players wouldn’t be available for big games such as, say, the 2010 Sugar Bowl, as the NCAA continues to implement an inherently unfair and hypocritical culture of using the talents of young men and women to make a ton of money while at the same time giving them the wholesale value of an “education” that many of them wouldn’t have wanted in the first place.

If the NFLPA lets this one slide, then the NFL will try in the future to take similar action when a former college player who has gotten himself in trouble with the NCAA wants to play pro football.

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96 Responses to “Pryor reverses course, plans to appeal”
  1. billinva says: Aug 19, 2011 11:28 AM

    What a tool.

  2. flyerscup2010 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:29 AM

    This has nothing to do with Pryor or his agent and everything to do with the NFLPA. When I heard he was getting suspended upon entering the league, my first thought was that if the NFLPA doesn’t appeal it, then a precedent is set going forward, and it’s a precedent that isn’t in the NFLPA’s interests.

    So what I gotta think happened here, given that Pryor’s not going to be on the field this season anyway most likely, is that the NFLPA told Cornwell they need to appeal this and asked them to not stand in the way.

  3. chc4 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:30 AM

    So the NFLPA is appealing its own ruling? Nice… gotta love unions.

  4. wryly1 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:33 AM

    This supplemental draft business is the most publicity Pryor will get in his NFL career. 5-6 years from now he’ll be the answer to a trivia question.

  5. darthhitman says: Aug 19, 2011 11:34 AM

    Who REALLY expected a dishonest person like Pryor to become honest in one off season? Up yeah, Down Nay

  6. pftstory says: Aug 19, 2011 11:34 AM

    not too much opinion leaked into that post.

  7. marcus158 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:34 AM

    Pryor gets suspended for FIVE NFL games when he’s not even part of an NFL team yet?

    Yeah, that makes complete sense.

    Not.

  8. mjkelly77 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:36 AM

    The NFL cuts him a break and he’s going to appeal? This guy is showing that he’s trouble already.

  9. nomoreseasontix says: Aug 19, 2011 11:36 AM

    Why does this idiot kid keep acting like a victim?
    Go away already.

  10. marvsleezy says: Aug 19, 2011 11:36 AM

    With about only 2 weeks of practice and no dominant skills, who would put this guy in a game before week 6 anyway??

  11. sportsreporterusa says: Aug 19, 2011 11:36 AM

    Oh Terrell…..Take the advice of your agent. Don’t appeal. This is not how you want to proceed. He better hope that the Commissioner’s decision is still binding after the appeal.

  12. FinFan68 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:38 AM

    Didn’t one of your previous posts state that the NFLPA approved of the suspension?

  13. hobartbaker says: Aug 19, 2011 11:38 AM

    And. So. They. Should.

  14. mikea311 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:41 AM

    if the ncaa wants to clean up its act, they need he nfl to win this case.

  15. sterling7 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:42 AM

    Moron, he’ll be lucky to get drafted, should’ve penalized him a full year-the added 11 games for being an idiot!

  16. wilddeuce03 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:43 AM

    If Pryor is suspended before he’s even in the league, for something he did in college, then everyone that had an indiscretion in college that is currently in the league should have a suspension coming. Right, Mr. Goodell?!

    Whole thing is a joke! I’ve tried to defend things the commissioner is doing but this is indefensible!

  17. melikefootball says: Aug 19, 2011 11:44 AM

    GEE did anyone think anything different. This guy yesterday was all happy with the penality to get in the NFL. Now a new tune…..have we heard this from Pryor before.

  18. 3octaveFart says: Aug 19, 2011 11:45 AM

    HAAHAAHAAHAAA
    Making friends already, eh Pryor?

  19. eaglebobby says: Aug 19, 2011 11:46 AM

    He shouldn’t be eligible period. The NFL is doing him a favor by including him in this draft. He made himself ineligible for his senior year by engaging in actions he knew were against the NCAA rules. Then to make himself further ineligible, he hired an agent. And quit crying about the NCAA using “the skills of athletes…..”–when they sign scholarship papers, they know the deal.

  20. wutliss07 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:46 AM

    O.H.!!

  21. qdog112 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:47 AM

    This is a predictable outcome. This time the NFL overlord has overstepped his bounds. Any 1st year law student could win this case. The courts will have rule that the NCAA is a defacto, farm system for the NFL (which is illegal), for the NFL to prevail.

    I’m glad he appealed, now let’s talk damages.

  22. ks718 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:48 AM

    He should appeal. Could you imagine having your pay garnished by your new job because you were late to work all the time at you old job? Maybe a bit oversimplified, but it’s about the same.

  23. ajknox88 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:49 AM

    NCAA rules don’t govern the NFL. Goodell is going too far w/ his “power”.

  24. deleteadjective says: Aug 19, 2011 11:51 AM

    NFL should reverse course and make him ineligible!

  25. cosmoman11 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:55 AM

    Good chance to win since his appeal will be heard by an independent third party. Oh, never mind.

  26. doe22us says: Aug 19, 2011 11:56 AM

    yep confused greedy tool nuff said. And he expects to be drafted oh k good luck

  27. lawyermalloy says: Aug 19, 2011 11:58 AM

    It appears that Drew made a deal to Not Appeal if the let the kid be involved in the supplement draft.Drew had his agent hat on Not his lawyers hat. Maybe he should have talked to the lawyer he hired for his client to disuss!

  28. kingdm8 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:58 AM

    I couldn’t care less about Pryor, but there is NO WAY he should be getting penalized for what he did in college once he signs with an NFL team. The NFL and the NCAA are two completely separate institutions and they should act as such. And, five games for what he did seems like a pretty harsh penalty considering what other players who actually are playing in the NFL have received in the past.

  29. 12strikes says: Aug 19, 2011 11:59 AM

    Come on Pryor….
    Can’t you just save us from this by
    going to the CFL or AFL, your going to be there in a season or two anyway.

  30. scomibord says: Aug 19, 2011 11:59 AM

    not surprising in the least. what do you expect from an entitled athlete?

  31. whoknowsnothing says: Aug 19, 2011 12:00 PM

    If the NFL really wants to help the NCAA, they should attack the agents or the companies they work for. The NFL should put out a statement that any agent that contacts any college player will be ban from working with any future NFL player and if this continues to happen within the same company then that company will face fine’s or a permanent ban from doing work with the NFL.

    The NCAA needs a better system period!!!
    They can make money of the players, but the players can’t make any. C’mon now!
    Pryor was selling memorabilia, with his own signature on it. NCAA needs to come to an agreement with college teams and the players they make money off, to allow them to organize events where players can sell their memorabilia and make some money.

    The NCAA makes millions of dollars of these kids, why can’t they make a couple of bucks themselves, but with the supervision of the NCAA and the teams and have them report the income. Every college kid needs some type of spending money.

    The NCAA should have done the right thing and suspended all the Ohio State players involved for the Bowl game instead of the oncoming season, but if they did that they would have lost money.

    USC got a stiff and heavy penalty from the NCAA for Reggie Bush. Now I expect Ohio State to face the same or even more restrictions from the NCAA. Anything less than what USC got would be a slap in the face to USC.

    NCAA needs to act quickly and let every college team they mean business instead of taking so long to come to a conclusion.

  32. hobartbaker says: Aug 19, 2011 12:03 PM

    Penalizing Pryor in this fashion BEFORE he is drafted or signed to a contract is the equivalent of BREAKING HIS WRIST in terms of what it does to his draft standing and immediate earning potential. The sixth game of the 2011 season comes around the beginning of November, and considering that he isn’t allowed to practice you can set his usefullness date back another month or two. A broken wrist probably would heal before that time.

    Ludicrous decision.

  33. cbass59 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:06 PM

    I would also appeal a made up rule. Like Pryor or not, the rule is bogus. Goodell just makes up things as he goes along. I can’t wait until he’s gone.

  34. dcbronco says: Aug 19, 2011 12:07 PM

    I love the way people are so willing to see one person punished while so many others do far worse and don’t even get mentioned. The “Regular Joe” gets screwed because he makes it clear that’s the way he wants it. If coaches and AD’s came do things and move on to new jobs. Players should be able to move on to new jobs too. The NCAA is a huge continuing criminal enterprise and should be disbanded. And the NFL punishing a new employee for what happened at an old job brings collusion and a whole new anti-trust issue into play. They need to learn to quit while they are ahead. Maybe they should start hiring and then firing people who lost their previous jobs because of what happened on the first. Maybe people will wake up then.

  35. scomibord says: Aug 19, 2011 12:09 PM

    next we will hear of scan newton’s dad suing because his son signed a contract for 1/3 of what last years number 1 pick received.

  36. thingamajig says: Aug 19, 2011 12:13 PM

    The NFL needs to get together and just not draft Pryor, problem solved.

  37. destroyedbydansnyder says: Aug 19, 2011 12:13 PM

    Jolly way to start a SHORT/BUST of a career.

  38. itsmammoth says: Aug 19, 2011 12:14 PM

    It’s kind of like being in a wreck, and then not being able to get a new car.

  39. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:16 PM

    mjkelly77 says:
    The NFL cuts him a break and he’s going to appeal?

    They didn’t cut him a break of any kind. According to the NFL’s own rules, he was eligible. Period.

    Bang up job by Roger Goodell keeping the slaves in their place.

    And the NFLPA sucks. They should have held firm instead of giving Goodell arbitrary powers where he can make up his own rules as he pleases.

    Terrelle Pryor, please, please, please sue the NFL for violating anti-trust law the minute the supplemental draft ends. I’m begging here.

  40. flyerscup2010 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:16 PM

    I think Pryor is a clown, but the bottom line is that Goodell is overstepping his legal authority. They screwed everyone not named Terrelle Pryor by postponing the supplemental draft to figure out what they’re gonna do about Pryor, knowing that despite the fact that he’s a turd they had no way to make him ineligible, so they tried this so they could look like they’re being tough on him while still letting him in. The bottom line is that this is all PR on the league’s part. To a fault. They overthought all of this and they look foolish for it. That doesn’t mean that Pryor isn’t scummy, it just means there’s nothing Goodell can do about it.

  41. kaveech says: Aug 19, 2011 12:16 PM

    This is sad. I don’t know anyone who thinks it’s fair to bolt for the NFL cause they got in trouble from the NCAA and not be punished. Why the NFLPA is sticking up for him I don’t know. Actually I do. They fear it could lead to opening what Scott Fujita called “Pandora’s Box”. Really the league is gonna start being more strict on ineligible college players trying to come into the NFL? I could see how that could be bad, why disrupt the integrity of the league (in a sarcastic voice). The only bad thing is that I used to side with the players, it seems like the lawyers are still fresh in their minds.

  42. Chris Guest says: Aug 19, 2011 12:17 PM

    This is more than likely all for show.

    The NFL has said for ages that Pryor was not eligible for the draft. But, the NFL didn’t want to stop the entire supplemental draft and screw other eligible players because Pryor was likely going to file an injunction to stop the the supp. draft.

    The NFL seeing the issue takes the sensible position that it will let Pryor in but needs to face a suspension for conduct unbecoming. In short, this is to stop other college players from doing it.

    Cornwell is pretty tight with the NFL and is more than likely fighting this as an “appearance” to give more power to the NFL to stop similar Pryor instants that might occur because the NFL is breaking its supp. draft rules. Once the NFL, says no (and the NFLPA is with the NFL on this one). He can say he tried and the NFL has the appearance of a stronger hand than they have.

    Also, isn’t strange for Pryor to have such expensive help given he is likely to be making at best 5-6th round money.

  43. kaveech says: Aug 19, 2011 12:19 PM

    However, in the grand scheme of things, it’s not gonna matter, Pryor is a complete bust. He should save his time and energy and go hang out with Maurice Clarett, or Troy Smith, or Vernon Gholston, or Ted Ginn Jr, or David Boston, or Andy Katzenmoyer, or (insert any Ohio State player). Outside of Eddie George, they’re all busts

  44. elgramo84 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:20 PM

    Hey we don’t want him in the cfl

  45. elgramo84 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:21 PM

    Hey we don’t want him in the cfl try india

  46. capslockkey says: Aug 19, 2011 12:24 PM

    NFL should have declared him ineligible. Now they’ll end up looking stupid. He skirted the rules, he should have been forced to wait until next year’s draft. A bad precedent has been set and it’s going to look even worse once he appeals and wins. I guess players can now “change their minds” after the April draft and still get in the NFL the same year simply by hiring an agent to make themselves ineligible.

  47. whatswiththehate says: Aug 19, 2011 12:24 PM

    I’m beginning to get the feeling that this kid’s agent and lawyer is intentionally doing what they are doing to keep this kid’s name in the media and have the media paint him as a victim for sympathy and to help his cause in the NFL.

    It seem everytime his lawyer say something PFT jumps on it with the usual NFL “needs to be ashame of themselves” article; when not to long ago Pryor was “bad news” to these sports guys. Now he is a victim and everytime an article comes out painting the NFL as bad people, his lawyer and agent change their minds, when not to long before they had a different attitude.

    It seems as if they are being swayed by the media and public’s perception of Pryor. Maybe Pryor should stop saying things until this whole Suplementary stuff is over.

    Also, I can see this kid having a sense of entitlement. But he’s no different than any rich kid with money and a good lawyer to get themselves out of trouble.

  48. shackdelrio says: Aug 19, 2011 12:25 PM

    Pryor should just change his name to Trouble.

    No way I would take him in the expansion. Not only is he a mediocre QB, he is not worth the headache that will certainly accompany him.

  49. dickroy says: Aug 19, 2011 12:32 PM

    What did you expect from a lawyer?

    The best thing would be if he is not drafted. Can the NFL reverse their decision and make him ineligable?

  50. kingdm8 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:34 PM

    itsmammoth says:
    Aug 19, 2011 12:14 PM
    It’s kind of like being in a wreck, and then not being able to get a new car.

    _________________________________

    No, it’s like being a high school kid and McDonald’s suspends you from work because you got detention at school.

  51. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:35 PM

    Chris Guest says:
    The NFL has said for ages that Pryor was not eligible for the draft.

    Right, except that they never said that. Not even once.

  52. phillycheez says: Aug 19, 2011 12:36 PM

    Is it just a coincidence that Maurice Clarett was also a Buckeye? Outcome will be similar in my opinion.

  53. FinFan68 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:44 PM

    ks718 says:
    Aug 19, 2011 11:48 AM
    He should appeal. Could you imagine having your pay garnished by your new job because you were late to work all the time at you old job? Maybe a bit oversimplified, but it’s about the same.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    You’re right; it is oversimplified…and off the mark. If you were constantly late at your old job, odds are you don’t get a new job.

  54. 3yrsnfl says: Aug 19, 2011 12:49 PM

    If you want to work for us… This is what you have to do. I believe he will be a bust. The only guys that make it are the guys that work. He has made it on talent alone and has no idea what work is.

  55. cbass59 says: Aug 19, 2011 12:50 PM

    kaveech,

    You forgot Santonio Holmes, Chris Carter, Nate Clements, Antoine Winfield, AJ Hawk, Nick Mangold, Joey Galloway, Will Smith, James Laurinaitis, Shawn Springs, Orlando Pace, Korey Stringer, Mike Vrabel, Terry Glenn.

    I could go back further (Pepper Johnson, Speilman, Keith Byars) but I think I made my point.

    Keep hating bro…it’ll ruin your health.

  56. pleasantsurpriselefty says: Aug 19, 2011 12:51 PM

    Nice package: Tyrelle, rookie dive in training + Drew “next question” Rosenhaus =s tempting combination for any GM contemplating wasting a draft choice here. I predict middle of the sixth round.

  57. ghostofgilchrist says: Aug 19, 2011 12:52 PM

    How many games will Reggie Bush and Pete Carroll be suspended?

    If you’re going to make up law, at least be consistant.

  58. m2karateman says: Aug 19, 2011 12:55 PM

    If there were still 10 rounds of the NFL draft, Pryor wouldn’t be worth a 10th round pick…..

    Enough of giving this spoiled “me first” brat quite more than his 15 minutes of fame.

  59. nomoreseasontix says: Aug 19, 2011 12:57 PM

    The bottom line is that the kid’s gonna flop. A team will take him and want him to switch to WR. He’ll pout because he thinks he’s a QB. He’ll get cut and bounce from team to team for a couple of years, mostly as an extra training camp body.

    Three years from now nobody will remember his name.

  60. nomoreseasontix says: Aug 19, 2011 1:02 PM

    And for the last time, He’s not being suspended for anything he did at OSU. He’s being suspended for trying to circumvent the draft process. The ONLY reason he’s been allowed in the supplemental is to avoid the court case that surely would have followed a decision to exclude him.

    He has no future in the NFL. He’s nothing but a sideshow and a way for good ol’ Drew to get a little media attention.

  61. sf987 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:05 PM

    I’m no Pryor fan but the inconsistent response between this and the Miami stuff is pretty pronounced. If Wilfork etc. got punished for their transgressions you people would be livid

  62. l6ozbud says: Aug 19, 2011 1:06 PM

    Playing college football and playing in the NFL is a privilege, not a right. Take what you get and don’t throw a fit.

  63. jlinatl says: Aug 19, 2011 1:06 PM

    If the kid and his attorney are going back on a negotiated settlement that allowed him into the draft, it does show a consistency is his make up. If it wasn’t an agreed upon contigency, he certainly has the right to appeal but it does look bad based upon stating he would not.

    Either way, he has some physical skills but from an NFL team perspective, the kid doesn’t show the maturity and leadership that you would want with a QB coming out of college.

  64. nahcouldntbethat says: Aug 19, 2011 1:16 PM

    The NFL is insane for attempting to punish somebody for behavior that occurred before they entered the NFL and that is widely known at the point that they enter the NFL.

    Terrelle Pryor violated no laws in the process of his interactions with Ohio State and the NCAA. He did violate NCAA regulations, but that’s an issue for the NCAA to sort out with appropriate sanctions at that level.

    The NFL has no business enforcing NCAA regulations unless the NFL and the NCAA are somehow organizationally linked under the same enforcement umbrella, which they are clearly not.

    If the NFL wants to make Terrelle Pryor ineligible for the NFL draft for some reason they should do so and then deal with the consequences in court after that fact.

    It’s totally bogus for the NFL to claim that they have some kind of statutory authority to deal with individual’s prior circumstances and actions at the time they enter the NFL. No such authority exists.

  65. 1bigtex says: Aug 19, 2011 1:20 PM

    Let’s see, Pryor had not used up his eligibility at Ohio State and had not declared for the regular draft. That means the only way he could get in the supplemental was to fess up to some things such as signing with an agent and taking money, which he did. Rather than opening a can of worms, the commisioner decided to let him in the supplemental with the suspension stipulation. Pryor agreed. Now, Terrelle wants to back out of his deal. Fine. Let him back out, but don’t let him in the draft. Ohio State clearly doesn’t want him back. They want to get as far away as fast as possible. Let him go play at some NAIA school for a year and see how much he improves his draft status.

    What a complete and total scumbag. He screwed up his life. Then, when given a second chance, he appears to be bound and determined to screw that up as well. Quit listening to your “stuck in the ‘hood” homies and get a clue. Great athlete? You bet. Would want him on my team? Wouldn’t even want him in my state. A douche bag extraordinaire!

  66. tjv027 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:31 PM

    I don’t get you people. Why is Pryor “lucky to be eligible”? How does violating the NCAA’s corrupt and flimsy rules make you any less worthy of being drafted than failing out of school like Caleb King? I don’t hear any whining about him.

  67. gadzod says: Aug 19, 2011 1:37 PM

    Maybe Roger Goodell suggested that Prior should appeal the suspension……

  68. denverdude7 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:41 PM

    The NFL / Roger Goodell have overstepped their authority on the Pryor suspension.

    The punishment simply doesn’t fit the crime. He sold a few jerseys and autographs true enough. However, he is not the one guilty of covering it up.

    Secondly, the NFL has no right to impose a penalty on a player who isn’t even in the league yet.

    That being said, Terrelle Pryor is a big steaming turd and I hope he fails miserably.

    Terrdelle, have you ever uttered one word of apology for your actions?

  69. tjv027 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:41 PM

    1bigtex says:
    Aug 19, 2011 1:20 PM
    Let’s see, Pryor had not used up his eligibility at Ohio State and had not declared for the regular draft. That means the only way he could get in the supplemental was to fess up to some things such as signing with an agent and taking money, which he did. Rather than opening a can of worms, the commisioner decided to let him in the supplemental with the suspension stipulation. Pryor agreed. Now, Terrelle wants to back out of his deal. Fine. Let him back out, but don’t let him in the draft. Ohio State clearly doesn’t want him back. They want to get as far away as fast as possible. Let him go play at some NAIA school for a year and see how much he improves his draft status.

    What a complete and total scumbag. He screwed up his life. Then, when given a second chance, he appears to be bound and determined to screw that up as well. Quit listening to your “stuck in the ‘hood” homies and get a clue. Great athlete? You bet. Would want him on my team? Wouldn’t even want him in my state. A douche bag extraordinaire!
    ——————————————-
    1. He didn’t have to fess up to anything. The only prerequisitie for supplemental draft eligibility is to have your college situation notably and drastically changed. His certainly was.

    2. Goodell didn’t “let him in with the suspension stipulation.” He let him in, and then suspended him. Pryor has just as much of a right to appeal his suspension as anyone else. Like any member of the NFLPA, he has nothing to lose by appealing. Which is why, undoubtedly, the NFLPA is pushing for the appeal. To appeal wouldn’t be worth putting on a tie for Pryor, who won’t sniff the field this year regardless. The NFLPA, however, has something to gain here.

    3. It’s not that Ohio State doesn’t “want him back”. He can’t come back, he hired an agent.

    4. Playing for an NAIA school against inferior competition would do nothing to show what he could do at a pro level. If, for whatever reason, he withdraws from the supplemental draft, all he would have to do is keep himself in shape and hold a pro day next year like every other draft-eligible player.

    5. Saying he “screwed up his life” is harsh. He’s not a drug addict, he didn’t get fired, he didn’t break any laws. He displayed poor judgement, and will pay dearly for it in his bank account. But he’s 21 years old, and has plenty of time to improve and earn himself a fat contract.

    6. Don’t believe everything you see and hear, don’t blindly follow the masses so much, and think for your freaking self for God’s sake.

  70. svcfilmguy says: Aug 19, 2011 1:47 PM

    He’s lucky to be eligible because he reneged on his word and was too stupid to declare when he had the chance. The supplemental draft was designed *specifically* to keep out people like Pryor. He knew exactly what he was doing. The NFL let him in. Fine. But they don’t want to set a precedent that you can break the rules and try to skirt the system. Nope.

  71. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:47 PM

    tjv027 says:
    I don’t get you people. Why is Pryor “lucky to be eligible”? How does violating the NCAA’s corrupt and flimsy rules make you any less worthy of being drafted than failing out of school like Caleb King? I don’t hear any whining about him.</i?

    Agreed. Why does no one complain about Caleb King flunking out of school and then becoming eligible? Is that so much better than the Pryor situation?

    For God's sake, are some of you really buying Goodell's fairy tale about Pryor coming up with some elaborate scheme to dance around the regular draft and then apply for the supplemental? How in the world would that benefit Pryor?

  72. hobartbaker says: Aug 19, 2011 1:51 PM

    The most glaring example to underline the hypocrisy of the whole situation is Cam Newton. Two guys who play the same position, are about the same size and age, similar athletic gifts, similar stats in their draft year.

    Pryor attends classes and works hard enough to make Big 10 All Academic team, but trades a few trinkets he earned through his football skill for cash or favors. A couple thousand dollars worth.

    Newton is expelled from school for theft, cheating, and poor academic performance, then attempts to sell his football skills for $200,000. 99% certain that he not only attempted, but succeeded in selling his skills for at least that amount. Still under investigation.

    So which guy is glorified by the league, the sponsors, and most of the fans, and which guy is vilified and deemed untouchable?

  73. jml4343 says: Aug 19, 2011 1:55 PM

    Pryor says he’s leaving school because he’s a distraction to hsi teammates. Then says he’s leaving because he was inelligible to play. Then he says he won’t appeal that he “elated” to just be able to play. Then says he will appeal.
    Either this guy doesn’t know how to tell the truth or he’s the puppet and someone else is pulling the strings.
    Sure—he’s got the makings of a team leader…..

  74. patpatriotagain says: Aug 19, 2011 1:59 PM

    so he changed his mind.

    the nfl should change their mind and make him ineligible for the draft

  75. bvanbvan says: Aug 19, 2011 2:03 PM

    Packer fan here who doesn’t have a dog in this fight, but how do you justify Pryor’s 5 game suspension against Roethlisberger’s 4 games?

  76. patpatriotagain says: Aug 19, 2011 2:09 PM

    cbass59 says:

    half your list are OSU players from the 90’s:
    Chris Carter, Nate Clements Shawn Springs, Mike Vrabel, Terry Glenn, antoine winfield, and Korey Stringer

    and Joey Galloway belongs nowhere near the list of good players

  77. svcfilmguy says: Aug 19, 2011 2:17 PM

    For God’s sake, are some of you really buying Goodell’s fairy tale about Pryor coming up with some elaborate scheme to dance around the regular draft and then apply for the supplemental? How in the world would that benefit Pryor?

    Well yeah. He didn’t declare, realized the massive stupidity involved in that decision, ran like a coward, and realized he wanted in the NFL rather than take his lumps in the minors.

    This isn’t exactly a faked Apollo moon landing.

  78. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 2:21 PM

    hobartbaker says:
    Newton is expelled from school for theft, cheating, and poor academic performance

    Get your facts straight- Newton was never expelled from anywhere. Look it up.

    Newton went #1 overall due to his arm strength. Pryor has similar size and athleticism, but he’s not as accurate with the pass and can’t get it downfield quickly like Newton can.

  79. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 2:26 PM

    svcfilmguy says:
    He didn’t declare, realized the massive stupidity involved in that decision, ran like a coward, and realized he wanted in the NFL rather than take his lumps in the minors.

    Oooooooh, a coward! I love internet namecalling.

    Reality is, Pryor’s situation changed. He wanted to serve the five game suspension and play the rest of the season, but it became clear there was no way Ohio State could ever put him on the field again. So he applied for the supplemental draft.

    This should not be difficult for someone as smart as you to understand.

  80. jetsetfred says: Aug 19, 2011 2:37 PM

    If I want to quit school to feed my family or for what ever reason I desire.. I should have a right… esp if I did my three years.. and if the NFL is my best suited line of work.. I should be able to join them without penalty… NFL has no right to dictate what I did was right on wrong in another corporation… If soo.. they need to draft players right out of high school and or college.. while players are still enrolled…. that’s the only way.. it should always be a grey area for players between NCAA and the NFL…. besides these schools are their own enemies by having donors and boosters… When you making Billions and you telling the young Men you can’t have ishh but a fat zero.. I say slavery!!! and you got your “own” Boosters doing things for these players under the table but you get mad.. You can’t have it both ways! Pay These Men!

  81. hooptie says: Aug 19, 2011 3:14 PM

    Pryor needs to hire Jim Brown.

  82. tjv027 says: Aug 19, 2011 3:15 PM

    svcfilmguy says:
    Aug 19, 2011 1:47 PM
    He’s lucky to be eligible because he reneged on his word and was too stupid to declare when he had the chance. The supplemental draft was designed *specifically* to keep out people like Pryor. He knew exactly what he was doing. The NFL let him in. Fine. But they don’t want to set a precedent that you can break the rules and try to skirt the system. Nope.
    ———————————————–

    Wrong, wrong, and wrong again. It’s amazing to me how little people actually know about the Pryor story in relation to how much they like to run their mouth about how “unworthy” he is to play in the NFL. Pryor was suspended for five games of Ohio State’s 2011 season, and then gave Head Coach Jim Tressel his word that he would return the next season. AFTER the 2011 NFL Draft, Pryor was informed that he would not be eligible to play in ANY games this season, around the same time that the man he promised to see this through with, Jim Tressel, was given his walking papers. If that’s not having your circumstances change after the draft deadline, then I don’t know what is.

  83. pigskinswag says: Aug 19, 2011 3:16 PM

    Good for him. He has every right to appeal. If he’s getting a five game suspension, then everyone in Miami-gate should get suspended. Oh yeah, and don’t leave Pete Carroll out either.

  84. tashkalucy says: Aug 19, 2011 3:16 PM

    Yes, it helps the NCAA in administering college football — colleges would back off of suspending players for fear they would leave the program for the NFL.

    But a bigger consideration is that the NFL doesn’t need to be know as a league that offers a safe haven to rule breakers. These “kids” are older then many fighting 24/7/365 in the Middle East. They know darn well what they’re doing.

    And Pryor is a joke. If OSU grads Troy Smith and Maurice Clarett couldn’t cut it in the NFL, what makes anyone think this overgrown kid can? Smith has a better arm, a much higher football IQ, character and leadership ability – Pryor has no character and will be laughed at by professionals if he tries to get out from under his coaches apron strings and assert himself as some sort of leader.

    By the way, is Cornwell the “representative” of Pryor that admitted the other day that golly gee shucks….he must have forgotten these many months, but yes, he did in fact put down a nice chunk of money on one of Pryors cars?

    A group of totally disgusting individuals.

    In 3 years Pryor will be playing in Canada, Arena Football, or some other second rate league. The only “accomplishment” he’ll has to show for his lie is taking down a major college program and its coach.

  85. jimyritz says: Aug 19, 2011 3:18 PM

    Still not sure how the NFL can suspend him when the issues took place in college.

    Is Goodell going to suspend all of those Miami guys once that unvestigation has been completed and what about as somone else said–Pete Carroll?

    The kid shouldn’t be allowed in the supplemental draft and be told to wait til next year’s NFL draft.

  86. hobartbaker says: Aug 19, 2011 3:19 PM

    @svcfilmguy – Good thing they didn’t hire you to fake the Apollo moon landing. It would have failed spectacularly and thousands of lives would have been lost as a result.

  87. tommyf15 says: Aug 19, 2011 3:29 PM

    tashkalucy says:
    If OSU grads Troy Smith and Maurice Clarett couldn’t cut it in the NFL, what makes anyone think this overgrown kid can?

    Right. That’s why Peyton Manning was a flop in the NFL- because if Heath Shuler and Joey Kent were flops, that means Manning was a flop as well.

    For the record I don’t think Pryor will make a major splash in the NFL. But that’s really not the issue at hand, is it?

  88. drbob117 says: Aug 19, 2011 3:33 PM

    As a matter of fairness, he should appeal. The NFL has never disciplined a player for gifts or kickbacks a player received in college; and with no one in their right mind believing that Pryor was the first guy to ever benefit from that kind of treatment in college, why should he be the first to be sanctioned by the NFL for it?

  89. svcfilmguy says: Aug 19, 2011 3:44 PM

    @svcfilmguy – Good thing they didn’t hire you to fake the Apollo moon landing. It would have failed spectacularly and thousands of lives would have been lost as a result.

    What does this mean? And how would thousands of lives been lost? From the shuttle exploding? From a fire in the studio?

    Could you please clarify your ridiculous and confusing comment?

  90. tdk24 says: Aug 19, 2011 3:49 PM

    Good for the kid. The NFL is messing around with him and it makes no sense.

    It’s like a kid working at McDonalds spills a vat of ketchup on the floor, the boss says clean it up. The kid says no and quits. He then goes to work for Burger King and his new boss dumps some ketchup on the floor and says clean that up before you start working for me.

  91. jakpsu1 says: Aug 19, 2011 4:58 PM

    Is there a bigger douche bag in sports than Terrelle Pryor? The league is nice enough to let you be apart of the supplemental draft, but you’ll be suspended for the first fives games. Let’s not forget you wouldn’t even be playing in those games if you weren’t suspended. But now you are going to appeal the suspension. You are by far the biggest douche in sports. Can’t wait to see you fail miserably in the NFL.

  92. 1bigtex says: Aug 19, 2011 5:00 PM

    @tommyf15

    While it’s true that Cam Newton never got expelled, it’s also true that he left school before he had to answer to the charges of theft and academic fraud. In other words, he walked out before they could throw him out. Not much of a difference.

  93. trojanwarrior007 says: Aug 19, 2011 11:54 PM

    he’ll never make it as a QB. the last drive against USC two years ago was proof that he has 0 awareness when it comes down to crunch time.

  94. truthserum4u says: Aug 20, 2011 2:57 AM

    The NFL clearly wants to do right by the curators of its free farm system, and while there’s no “precedent” in a legal sense (indeed, the NFL would prefer not to be bound by past cases when considering the merits of new ones), the move represents the first attempt by the NFL to “help” the NCAA with the possibly unsolvable problem of enforcing inconsistently enforced rules with substandard resources and no real desire to ferret out every possible violation for fear that star players wouldn’t be available for big games such as, say, the 2010 Sugar Bowl, as the NCAA continues to implement an inherently unfair and hypocritical culture of using the talents of young men and women to make a ton of money while at the same time giving them the wholesale value of an “education” that many of them wouldn’t have wanted in the first place.

    Conrats Mike – you’ve made it into the Guinness Book of World Record for the longest run-on sentence! (148 words)

    You’ve had some doozies in the past, but this one takes the cake! Too funny!!

  95. tatum064 says: Aug 20, 2011 9:52 AM

    Its the principal. You shouldnt be punished for anything, but this means whatever team that would want to develop him then has to take on baggage – Hello Washington Redskins!!!! LOL

    anyway, its unfair, but its best to take the “L” on this one, primarily because you wont play for the first 5 even if you do make the team….is this guy going to the “Maurice Clarett school of Public Relations” or what?!

    If you lawyer up; Plead the FIFTH! Get the playbook, get in the filmroom and get busy. The buzz going is the Colts would make a run at this guy b/c he’d be learning from one of the best to ever play the game- but NOW THIS!?

  96. freddyjones198420 says: Aug 20, 2011 11:49 AM

    Everyone is talking about this whole Pryor NFL fiasco. Now you seemed to be focused on whether or not the NFL did the right thing.

    Let’s get back to those Ohio state allegations.
    If what Pryor says is true Ohio State should be in a lot more trouble and everyone is brushing over that. Pryor and his mom getting money, cars and God knows what else is as bad as what Miami has allegedly done and everyone is brushing over that. This is so clear it’s pitiful.

    Gene Smith has bamboozled his way out of this with his buddies in the NCAA. I think this “agreement” with the NFL was all set up so that one can simply ignore all of Ohio States allegation and that is BS.

    As far as athletes getting paid is everyone crazy? How would you enforce this? I work for a company…My company makes a butt-load of money…shouldn’t I get a majority of the profits? That is crazy.

    There is no way athletes should get paid. When in fact they are already. They are not “slaves”. As David Cornwell would have you think and just for the record I am black and i am a former college athlete. Some get room and board, food, all those other perks, and especially an education. Most people in America are not fortunate enough to get that. Besides there is no way to determine who…how much…what sports(and they all should get paid if one does)…how to tax it…etc…etc… so stop with all this talk.

    These kids aren’t some naive flowers that are so overwhelmed by these sports these are kids playing on a sport in college.

    So stop all this other talk and please someone investigate the “real” Ohio state I am so tired of everyone pretending that they have been so good all of these years because Tressel was such a great man…coach…recruiter.

    These kids over the years knew what they could get if they came to Ohio State that is why so many of them came here. Ohio State is just as bad if not worse than Miami.

    By the way Pryor will fail in the NFL. Just like Clarett. It’s amazing to me that now the media is simply ignoring that fact. Way to educate young men OSU & Tressel.

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