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Letter to Pryor makes clear Goodell’s desire to assist enforcement of NCAA rules

Terrelle Pryor Pro Day Getty Images

Although the NFL publicly has claimed that the five-game suspension of former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor does not represent the first step in an effort by the NFL to help the NCAA enforce its eligibility rules, the private communication from Commissioner Roger Goodell to Pryor makes clear the league’s belief that NCAA rules violations can, and should, jeopardize NFL eligibility.

In Goodell’s letter of August 18, 2011 to Pryor, a copy of which PFT has obtained, Goodell outlines the facts relating to Pryor’s NCAA rules violations, and regarding Pryor’s decision to leave school, hire an agent, and enter the NFL’s supplemental draft.

“I do not believe that a player who has affirmatively acted contrary to NCAA rules should automatically and immediately be deemed eligible to pursue a potentially lucrative career in the NFL,” Goodell writes.  “Doing so would be inconsistent with common-sense notions of accountability and personal responsibility, and distorts our own eligibility principles.  Accordingly, I believe that it would be entirely appropriate to find you ineligible for the Supplemental Draft, and to require you to defer entry into the NFL until the regular April 2012 College Draft.”

Though Goodell then softened his position to mirror the five-game suspension that was imposed by Ohio State late last year on Pryor, the link between the sanction and Pryor’s NCAA violations is clear.  Goodell even cites “the NFL’s historic support for college football” in explaining the decision.

And so, while the league insists that the Pryor suspension sets no precedent, the letter provides a window into Goodell’s mind regarding the issue of NCAA violations.  That belief will continue to be a factor in any similar cases that land on Goodell’s desk.

Whether or not this constitutes a “precedent” is a matter of semantics.  The NFL, under Goodell, believes that the “historic support for college football” includes erecting barriers to entering the NFL when players have violated NCAA rules.  The NFL, under Goodell, should thus be expected to adopt a similar attitude and mindset in the future, regardless of whether violations were uncovered before or after the player joins the NFL.

That’s why Pryor needs to appeal the decision.  It’s not just about him — it’s about the question of whether the NFLPA will allow Goodell to rely upon vague notions of “detrimental conduct” to fashion specific sanctions that fit his intended outcome in each given case, regardless of whether the broader approach reflects any sense of consistency, justice, or fairness.

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69 Responses to “Letter to Pryor makes clear Goodell’s desire to assist enforcement of NCAA rules”
  1. iamgoodkid says: Aug 21, 2011 1:18 PM

    come on terrell pryor play with atlanta as a back up

    Depth Chart Atlanta: 1. Matt Ryan
    2. Terrelle Pryor
    3. Chris Redman

    That’s how it should go like that

  2. skoobyfl says: Aug 21, 2011 1:19 PM

    Next, Roger will become the Vice-Chancellor of the US & all decisions are to be made through him, Master of all he can see.

  3. dapell says: Aug 21, 2011 1:22 PM

    Why wasn’t Pete Carroll suspended 5 games? This better extend to coaches who get their NCAA teams into trouble and then try to run to the NFL.

  4. dannomac21 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:22 PM

    “That’s why Pryor needs to appeal the decision. It’s not just about him”

    pryor would be the first one to disagree.

  5. jacunn2000 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:26 PM

    What was Goodell thinking? I am pretty sure Pryor cant read.

  6. phillyfan4ever says: Aug 21, 2011 1:27 PM

    LAME

  7. depotnator says: Aug 21, 2011 1:27 PM

    Once Pryor joins a team and the NFLPA, can the NFLPA not appeal any decision that adversely affects its membership? It is the NFLPA that should be concerned about precedent, not Pryor. It’s understandable that Pryor just wants to get on with his career and not be at odds with the league. The NFLPA is already regretting that it caved on the issue of Goodell alone being judge, jury, and executioner of NFL discipline.

  8. 6stairwayto7 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:28 PM

    This league is going to hell. I can’t wait till the Steelers win this next Super Bowl and start their own league. All this mess won’t happen in the SFL, you can count on that. 6 rings (about to be 7.) Hurray for us…

  9. raiderlyfe510 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:31 PM

    Tired of hearing about the power drunken NFL Grand Dragon…He’s a joke of a commissioner.

  10. tommyf15 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:31 PM

    Not sure how anyone could cheerlead a corporate bully like Goodell abusing his authority to disallow an eligible employee from entering his chosen field, but we’re about to see lots of it.

    But I’m glad Goodell has gotten away from subtly violating anti-trust laws and is now flagrantly doing so. If anyone needs to be disciplined it’s Roger Goodell, and hopefully the courts will be doing it soon.

  11. Patriot42 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:33 PM

    These people believe the rules shouldn’t apply to them because they are somehow special shouldn’t be allowed to jump into the NFL and I believe Pryor should be denied from coming into to the NFL until 2012.

  12. nomoreseasontix says: Aug 21, 2011 1:34 PM

    Seems like all he’s saying is it’s not right to allow a kid to break the rules, get caught, then cut and run to the NFL through a back door.

    And I can’t stand Goodell, but he’s right.

    That’s exactly what Pryor has done.

    At least after the draft he’ll start to fade away. He’s used up way more than his 15 minutes.

  13. raiderlyfe510 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:34 PM

    He could discipline athletes with his warped sense of justice..but that’s ALL he’s known for..

    Meanwhile he’s destroying the NFL by turning it in to National Flag Football league.

    Won’t stop this Raider thang though…we’re still gonna be bullying these teams..smacking players around, making them tap out, and making QBs get carted off the field..just like 2000.

  14. lionpride10 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:35 PM

    I think that having the NFL dole out suspensions to players for taking money in college is a great idea. Look, these players don’t care if they get caught taking money or gifts, they can just declare for the NFL and they are clean (if they qualify), but if they make it so they so the pros have consequences, it might discourage players from taking that chance.

  15. doe22us says: Aug 21, 2011 1:37 PM

    And that is why i like Roger Goodell he just gets it… If a lot of playes know that their ability to pursue a career in the NFL may possibly be affected a lot of them will think twice before accepting illicit cash for their rims, tats and skrippers.

  16. chacochicken says: Aug 21, 2011 1:37 PM

    Yes, the NFL and NCAA pristine bastions of truth, justice and accountability.
    Is Pryor old enough? Is he currently committing a felony? You’ve already got convicted felons playing and numerous other players that have qualified for NCAA violations. Bad play Rog.

  17. talkintrashallday says: Aug 21, 2011 1:38 PM

    Get tattoos at Ohio State – 5 game suspension
    Rape 2 women in one year – 4 game suspension

    yea….now that’s justice.

  18. hobartbaker says: Aug 21, 2011 1:41 PM

    Pryor is getting the tough love because Goodell is concerned about the Newton effect. Having some guy come along who is completely corrupt and ends up being the high profile top draft pick. Michael Vick. O.J. Simpson. They end up as the faces of the league and drag the image into the dirt. You can tell Goodell doesn’t like Newt very much and is very uneasy about the situation. He doesn’t want to face the same thing every year.

  19. jetsetfred says: Aug 21, 2011 1:41 PM

    It shouldn’t matter what the cause maybe.. rules breaking or just wanna quit.. He did his 3 years.. and isshh changes between April… and before the football season start.. So if he want to try to go in the supplemental draft he should! He owes Ohio State nothing! Should he work for MetLife or some other Company should they penalize him as well?

  20. rcali says: Aug 21, 2011 1:41 PM

    I got a great idea. How about some of these college players clean up their act? How may companies do you think hire kids out of college who can’t seem to follow the rules?

  21. wamzlee says: Aug 21, 2011 1:42 PM

    Welp, Goodell better fire Pete Carroll then. As well as suspend everyone from USC and the U.

  22. Arun Krishnan says: Aug 21, 2011 1:48 PM

    The supplemental draft is for players whose eligibility changed since the April draft. Which means a lot of players who flunk out, or get banned or something along the lines of ‘detrimental conduct’ will be in it.

    Either completely remove it and make everyone wait for the April draft, or admit that the NFL isn’t here to fix the NCAA’s problems. This half-hearted 5 game suspension does no one any justice, it’s just the Commissioner being arbitrary. Which wouldn’t be as troubling if not for the fact that he is judge, jury and executioner for the next decade.

  23. cosmoman11 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:50 PM

    Let’s see what kind of discipline Goodell imposes when Jim Tressel is hired as a coach/consultant/advisor by some team. I’m guessing “none”.

  24. tommyf15 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:50 PM

    lionpride10 says:
    I think that having the NFL dole out suspensions to players for taking money in college is a great idea.

    So do I. That way the players could sue and take all of the owners’ money.

    Is anyone else tired of being LIED TO by Roger Goodell? First the problem was that Pryor allegedly tried to backdoor the NFL’s draft system (which he didn’t), then Goodell changes his story.

    What a steaming pile of brown stuff Roger Goodell is.

  25. steelerdynasty2010 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:50 PM

    should’ve just made him to be ineligible for the supplemental draft and then let him enter the 2012 draft. the only one who would be interfering with his ability to work would be him. he’s ineligible as a result of something HE did. had he not “agreed” to return to school, he wouldve gotten out ahead of this and declared for the 2011 draft in the first place. the fact that he decided to sign an agreement just to play in a bowl game (which only prolonged the inevitability of a prolonged suspension) should not give him the benefits associated with being included in the supplemental draft. the supplemental draft should be reserved for players whose post draft circumstances have changed due to forces outside of their control (such as a delayed decision on an extra year of eligibility due to hardship or medical reasons) or an unforseen setback of some sort (maybe academic ineligibility such as failing a second semester class)
    instead, roger’s decided to take another opportunity to flex his muscles.

  26. richie215 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:52 PM

    If Goodell decides to enforce NCAA rules, I can see someone suing the NFL for entry into the league directly after high school.

  27. iknowitallandmore says: Aug 21, 2011 1:52 PM

    Mr. Goodell is too nice. He needs to get tougher on these kids and players

  28. 89seminole says: Aug 21, 2011 1:54 PM

    It is not anyone’s “right” to play in the NFL.

  29. philyeagles5 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:54 PM

    i remember the good ol days when the NFL and NCAA tried to distance themselves from each other.

  30. 3octaveFart says: Aug 21, 2011 1:55 PM

    All hail Roger Goodell.
    Grand Master of the Universe.

  31. dgrowe213 says: Aug 21, 2011 1:57 PM

    So… if that’s the case then where is Reggie Bush’s suspension? How about the players implicated in the Miami scandal?

    Seems to me that they’re using Pryor as a scapegoat.

    I agree “something” needs to be done to discourage college athletes from breaking NCAA rules, but I don’t see how suspending Pryor accomplishes that.

  32. bobnelsonjr says: Aug 21, 2011 2:00 PM

    1) Pryor is not a member of the NFLPA*

    2) Why should rulebreakers be rewarded for their immoral acts? It is very bad policy.

    3) The NFL has to have some minimum standard for player conduct. Lawyers always argue that the minimum is set too high. Most still think the minimum standard of conduct for NFL players is too low now.

    4) Pryor has not earned anything including an opportunity to play in the NFL.

    5) The NFL commisioner is cutting him too much a break. Pryor could have his opportunity in the UFL . Joining the NFL is a priiledge not a right.

  33. derekjetersmansion says: Aug 21, 2011 2:06 PM

    If Goodell doesn’t suspend him, it sets an even worse precedent.

    Yeah, you can screw up in college. The NFL will help you escape!

    My only problem with this is why it’s 5 games. That seems harsh.

  34. derekjetersmansion says: Aug 21, 2011 2:08 PM

    @tommyf15

    Doesn’t Pryor HAVE to go through a draft of some sort?

  35. jacksaysfu says: Aug 21, 2011 2:10 PM

    This raider thang ? lol that was corny .. When was the last time the Raiders were even a playoff team ? Thats why Asomugha left , thanks though he is awesome .

  36. hobartbaker says: Aug 21, 2011 2:14 PM

    Goodell’s intentions are sincere, I’m sure, but you can’t sacrifice the individual for the principle. Terrelle Pryor is neither stupid nor corrupt. He would stand above half the players taken in the first round of the regular draft in terms of intelligence and ethics. A good number of them served (or dodged) more serious NCAA rule violations than Pryor is accused of. Why should he carry the burden for all?

  37. nomoreseasontix says: Aug 21, 2011 2:16 PM

    “Won’t stop this Raider thang though…we’re still gonna be bullying these teams..smacking players around, making them tap out, and making QBs get carted off the field..just like 2000.”
    ______________________________

    Man… I’m a Raider fan, and that even sounds idiotic to me.

    I guess you couldn’t catch the game yesterday.

  38. citizenstrange says: Aug 21, 2011 2:18 PM

    Goodell is unfit to give lectures on corruption unless it’s a “how to” type situation.

    If only someone could discipline Goodell for destroying the Patriot cheating tapes a nanosecond after he received them.

    That was a dirty little sleazy move. A thousand times worse than trading jerseys for tattoos.

  39. citizenstrange says: Aug 21, 2011 2:20 PM

    Add to previous:

    If I were Goodell I would be hard at work trying to make sure fans don’t get murdered at games.

    Seriously.

  40. dontouchmyjunk says: Aug 21, 2011 2:28 PM

    I have no idea if Pryor will amount to anything in the NFL, but I support the decision by Goodell in this instance. It doesn’t mean anything anyway. It’s not as if Pryor has any chance of contributing to a team in 2011. And he’s not going to get a large guaranteed contract, either.

    The NFL and NCAA have two choices: Either punish players and programs like the U, Ohio State, and USC severely, or give it up and pay the collegiate players above board as the minor league pros they actually are.

    This head in the sand approach of half hearted disciplinary action does nobody any good.

  41. cbass59 says: Aug 21, 2011 2:29 PM

    So I guess Reggie Bush and all U of Miami player should be expecting a punishment in the near future?

    Goodell is making it up as he goes along.

  42. ihateannouncers says: Aug 21, 2011 2:29 PM

    I am not a Goodell fan but have to agree with his thinking in this case. Not sure he is ready for the giant can of worms he opens with this decision though. As a fan of college and pro football, I like the idea that college coaches and players can’t just bail out and go to the NFL to avoid penalties from the NCAA. Its obvious that winning and money are the only things that motivate elite players and coaches these days. Maybe the NFL saying that you will lose money by cheating in college will make some of these guys think twice. Nothing else has worked so why not??

  43. 10yardslant says: Aug 21, 2011 2:32 PM

    If Roger Goodell is going suspend future NFL “PROSPECTS” for there NCAA Violations, than the same rules and judgement’s should apply to all future NFL Coaches as well.

    dapell makes this very point above and couldn’t agree more.

    If Goodell wants to show that he is for a better NFL and protecting its brand image, then holding coaches accountable for their actions are just as important.

    Coaches are the leaders and example setters for each individual team. If players see coaches are not examined and reviewed under the same microscope then I don’t believe anything changes.

  44. willjasper says: Aug 21, 2011 2:34 PM

    The suspension might also wake some kids up to the fact that breaking rules has consequences. That you can’t break them at one level then move to the next like nothing happened (this really needs to apply to coaches to).

    Is it any different than a company being leery of hiring someone when they see that they stole from the cash register at their last job?

  45. cliffordc05 says: Aug 21, 2011 2:42 PM

    I believe the key factor is that Pryor had an opportunity to declare for the last draft but did not do so. At the time he knew he was facing a five game suspension by the NCAA. He waited until after the draft and then hired an agent which immediately made him ineligible for NCAA participation. He hired the agent voluntarily, knowing that this action would make him ineligible. At that time, nothing else regarding his eligibility had officially changed.

    The NFL does not want players to game the system for their benefit. This case was obviously complicated because of the revelations coming to light at OSU and Pryor’s eligibility may have been revoked. However, Pryor made the decision to change his eligibility status after the date the NFL has set for such decisions.

  46. imasturbate says: Aug 21, 2011 2:46 PM

    The real question is…what’s he going to do to the “U” players that are going to want to go pro? Where does it stop? Will Reggie Bush be penalized? What about all the “U” players that are in the NFL? Cam Newton? I just don’t know how he can punish Pryor and not all the players that have had shady college careers. Seems hypocritcal to me….just sayin

  47. tommyf15 says: Aug 21, 2011 2:47 PM

    dontouchmyjunk says:
    I have no idea if Pryor will amount to anything in the NFL, but I support the decision by Goodell in this instance. It doesn’t mean anything anyway. It’s not as if Pryor has any chance of contributing to a team in 2011.

    If it “doesn’t mean anything” why suspend him?

    And you’re wrong- Pryor isn’t just suspended from games, he’s suspended from practices. This will impede his development, and thus lessen his value.

    The NFL and NCAA have two choices: Either punish players and programs like the U, Ohio State, and USC severely, or give it up and pay the collegiate players above board as the minor league pros they actually are.

    A third choice for the NFL and NCAA is to stay out of one another’s business.

  48. tommyf15 says: Aug 21, 2011 2:51 PM

    cliffordc05 says:
    I believe the key factor is that Pryor had an opportunity to declare for the last draft but did not do so. At the time he knew he was facing a five game suspension by the NCAA. He waited until after the draft and then hired an agent which immediately made him ineligible for NCAA participation. He hired the agent voluntarily, knowing that this action would make him ineligible.

    That’s not what happened.

    In May we learned that in addition for receiving free tattoos Terrell Pryor also received cash for him signing memorabilia.

    When that was discovered it became obvious that Pryor would permanently lose his eligibility.

  49. motobus says: Aug 21, 2011 3:00 PM

    Why is this guy being vilified? I would like to see anyone here, chastising Pryor for taking money, turn down free money as a college student.

  50. santolonius says: Aug 21, 2011 3:02 PM

    when goodell suspends a player for conduct such as a bar fight, nobody protests. why should behavior that causes the vacating of wins for a college team as well as the needless misery to millions of fans be considered more trifling than the bar fight? goodell is wholly justified in suspending college violators. and the nflpa should back him up all the way.

  51. santolonius says: Aug 21, 2011 3:09 PM

    if an nfl player merely shot a bird at an average citizen, goodell could suspend him a game for conduct unbecoming. no one would argue very much. is pryor’s wilfull violations of ncaa rules and the trainwreck they caused not much more than the shooting of a middle finger at the entire state of ohio? i really do not think you have fully thought out the entire premise of your position. or if you have, you should do an entire post explaining it.

  52. derekjetersmansion says: Aug 21, 2011 3:11 PM

    To everyone,

    Coaches are employees, players aren’t.

  53. d. b. cooper says: Aug 21, 2011 3:11 PM

    I’m thinking of starting a “Bring Back Tagliabue” campaign.

  54. hobartbaker says: Aug 21, 2011 3:27 PM

    If you look at the top 5 players taken in the regular draft, three of them, Dareus, Green, and Peterson, served game suspensions of varying length for academic or conduct violations. The Blessed Individual dodged consequences repeatedly through outrageous lies. Von Miller was the only one who seems clean coming out of college.

  55. usmutts says: Aug 21, 2011 3:31 PM

    Two things:

    1. If “detrimental conduct” requires punishment then Goodell himself needs to be punished. It’s a compete scandal that he participated in steering M. Vick to one team rather than another. The commissioner of a sports league has no business even discussing which team a player should choose.

    2. No coach will ever be disciplined under this rule, because coaches are a part of management, like the owners, not a part of labor, like the players. Goodell is employed by management and is owned by management. He is their in-house flunky. This is not the way it should be. The commissioner of the NFL should be selected, and employed, by both the owners and the players.

  56. cliffordc05 says: Aug 21, 2011 3:36 PM

    tommyf15

    In May when Pryor hired his agent, he was still eligible according to the NCAA. Allegations were made that he had received money for memorabilia. I believe that at this time they are still unproven allegations and that no other members of the Ohio State team, facing the same allegations, have been ruled ineligible.

    Pryor chose not to challenge the charges that he violated NCAA regulations. Many other players charged with NCAA violations actually cooperate with investigators to prove that allegations of misconduct are not true. Maybe Pryor’s conduct after the charges were made public indicates that he is guilty. Who knows. There has never been a published finding of facts by the NCAA.

  57. qball59 says: Aug 21, 2011 3:53 PM

    The root of the problem here is that the NCAA is trying to distort the present-day economic realities of college football in a vain attempt to preserve the sentimental notion of the student-athlete. If a person, in this case a football player, has talents which have commercial value, then why should he be denied the right to financial remuneration in the exercise of those talents? The IOC figured this out a few decades ago with respect to professional athletes participating in the Olympics, so why can’t the NCAA wake up and deal with reality as well?

    I think the solution here is to simply base athletic scholarships not only on the skills of the player but also on his economic situation, just like any other recipient of financial aid. For example, if a prominent college football player like Terrelle Pryor or Reggie Bush is receiving income from boosters, agents or whoever, then let them keep the cash, with the stipulation that it be considered income and, if it exceeds a certain threshold, then that player is no longer eligible for financial aid and his scholarship goes to someone else. He could still continue to play college football but he would be paying his own way through school.

    If a computer science major entered college on a financial aid/scholarship and at some point thereafter began writing and selling his own software programs while he was still in school, he would be lauded for his intelligence and initiative. But if a “student-athlete” starts receiving any compensation whatsoever outside of room and board and a helmet, he’s branded as a “cheat” and a “rule-breaker”. Sorry, but that’s just a crock.

    The NCAA needs to stop trying to live in the past and face the economic realities of big-time college athletics in the 21st century. And Roger Goodell needs to have his power to hand out arbitrary, capricious and discriminatory punishments severely curtailed.

  58. covercorner says: Aug 21, 2011 3:57 PM

    How can the NFL suspend a player for actions committed before the player is a member of the league. This is highly illegal.

  59. jamie54 says: Aug 21, 2011 4:03 PM

    Don’t get it. I thought Goodell’s statement also indicated the NFL discussed the option with the NFLPA, of which Pryor is NOT a member. So who the heck would he appeal to since he’s not a union member?

  60. tommyf15 says: Aug 21, 2011 4:04 PM

    @cliffordc05

    I’m unaware of the discovery of any other player receiving cash for signed memorabilia.

    Pryor’s seemingly honest mistake was leaving school before being officially kicked off the Buckeyes , but make no mistake- there’s no way he was ever playing for them again,no matter what.

    I mean seriously, they told Jim Tressel to resign. Who thinks they would have kept Pryor around after that?

  61. cliffordc05 says: Aug 21, 2011 4:19 PM

    tommyf15

    I agree that Pryor was never going to be playing for Ohio State. I also suspect that Ohio State and the NCAA were willing to drag on any investigation so that Pryor could not possibly petition the NFL for inclusion in the supplemental draft. He was being squeezed and the school/NCAA wanted its pound of flesh.

    The bigger question in all of this is the financial restraints placed upon out of state scholarship athletes. At some point the NCAA should require schools to pay scholarship players a minimum of $500 per month for expenses in addition to what they currently receive.

  62. tiffpats4eva says: Aug 21, 2011 5:06 PM

    Pryor should appeal the decision.

    What about Pete Carroll’s “detrimental conduct” towards the USC football program?

  63. whatswiththehate says: Aug 21, 2011 5:10 PM

    hobartbaker says:Aug 21, 2011 1:41 PM

    Pryor is getting the tough love because Goodell is concerned about the Newton effect. Having some guy come along who is completely corrupt and ends up being the high profile top draft pick. Michael Vick. O.J. Simpson. They end up as the faces of the league and drag the image into the dirt. You can tell Goodell doesn’t like Newt very much and is very uneasy about the situation. He doesn’t want to face the same thing every year.
    —————–
    U are so transparent.

    How benevoant of u. Quickly running to the defense of one black kid, who u more prefer, while maliciously bashing another based on false charges. I guess that’s a good way to show that ur not a stone cold bigot.

  64. laxer37 says: Aug 21, 2011 5:30 PM

    More exhausting discussion about a guy that won’t see the field this year, if at all.

    Can we finally put a bullet in this topic already?

  65. Derty Ernie says: Aug 21, 2011 5:52 PM

    I agree with the decision but think the league made a huge mistake that will bite them in the ass years to come.

    First black atheletes have so much support from the Rev Jackson and Al Shartons of the world that any ruling against them means tons of lawyers.

    Second, the NFL by not laying down the gauntlet is saying were afraid of litigation. Were afraid of the fight,and they may have screwed college football. Instead of great football in college you’ll have altletes showcase their talents for one year, leave promissing programs hanging and go pro without a tussle. The teams and schools suffer.

    Third, I like to tell Mr Pryor, I would have loved a scholarship but I had vietnam looking at me instead. So don’t play the poor black kid routine, you could have joined the military and earned a living.

  66. vicksprman says: Aug 21, 2011 7:13 PM

    Okay so this is now officially going to far, where is Goodall’s letter to Pete Carroll suspending him for the USC nonsense, when can we expect the U players in the NFL’s suspension? Ridiculous

  67. vicksprman says: Aug 21, 2011 7:19 PM

    So Caleb King decides to stop going to classes and he’s eligible just total nonsense. Here’s a though do away with the supplemental draft and if you get kicked out of school you wait until the next year or become a free agent.

  68. godofwine330 says: Aug 21, 2011 7:59 PM

    God I do hate that guy. I hope Pryor’s lawyers win, even though I am not a fan of Pryor.

  69. mitchitized says: Aug 22, 2011 5:45 AM

    First, if you read this and think it is a rant, you’re right. I apologize for nothing and to no one. This one is well deserved.

    Whoever it is, please stop shooting everyone with the stoopid gun, already!

    Idiotic Point 1: What he did in college was bad, therefore he needs to be punished in the NFL.That’s exactly like saying “Well son, we love you enough to give you the job, but since you were caught stealing toilet paper from your high school back when you were a student, we’ve decided to not pay you for your first month and a half.” Yeah, that sounds perfectly reasonable to me.

    Idiotic Point 2: This is the NFL, he has no right to be included but it is a privilege, gotta keep the shield clean, blah blah. Yeah, professional athletes define the ethical and moral standards of modern society. They do such a better job than parents, teachers, and other adults, right?

    Idiotic Point 3: Goodell is only trying to protect the image of the NFL by punishing those that flaunt the rules and think they can get away with it. We got fans shooting and beating each other at games (and this is actually nothing new – so who exactly is Roger trying to protect the image of the NFL for, and from?

    This is professional sports. These are professional athletes. They are paid to run, throw, catch, block, and tackle. They are barely paid to think, their physical abilities are 99% of what they are there for. Otherwise you’d have accountants and janitors holding down the line with bus drivers on go routes. Come on mailman, you gotta checkdown to that bank teller over there!

    If you need a role model, look at your parents, uncles, aunts, LOOK IN THE MIRROR.

    Roger Goodell has introduced dogma and zealotry to the NFL, making him the biggest mistake the league has made in its entire history.

    Agreed on the above points that it is absolutely hypocritical that Goodell punishes a player for offending the NCAA and turns a blind eye to a coach that did a whole heckuva lot more damage to the NCAA than one student can.

    Hey Roger Goodell, please take a moment and read this Wikipedia article that was written about you:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigotry

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