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Pryor’s decision to appeal remains unclear

Terrelle Pryor Pro Day Getty Images

Terrelle Pryor may have notified the league about his intention to appeal his suspension, there remains doubt about whether it will happen.

ESPN’s Adam Schefter reports that Pryor’s lawyer David Cornwell filed a letter to appeal two weeks ago without talking to Pryor, Pryor’s agent, or the NFLPA.  Furthermore, Cornwell’s letter reportedly just reserves the right to appeal.

In the meantime, Cornwell has sadly suffered a stroke.  He hasn’t spoken with Pryor about the decision to appeal. Pryor hasn’t granted his approval for any appeal to move forward.

Pryor told the NFL he wouldn’t appeal the suspension when he was allowed to be drafted.

“The feeling is Cornwell won’t proceed without Pryor’s consent, though some players around the leauge would like to see an appeal,” Schefter reports.

In short: This is a mess, with a lot of conflicting interests from Pryor to Cornwell to the NFLPA.

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22 Responses to “Pryor’s decision to appeal remains unclear”
  1. edmazeing1 says: Sep 4, 2011 12:54 PM

    Go T.P…Go Raiders!!!

  2. tommyf15 says: Sep 4, 2011 1:00 PM

    The mindset in the Pryor camp may be “if Jim Tressell can work for the NFL without suspension, why can’t Prior?”

    Before you respond by saying “Pryor is suspended for attempting to circumvent the regular entry draft”, consider that Roger Goodell specifically cited the NFL’s relationship with the NCAA when announcing the suspension.

    Of course, there was no need to suspend Prior in the first place, and Goodell continues to lose public support in the face of his arbitrary and inconsistent rulings.

  3. jaggedmark says: Sep 4, 2011 1:01 PM

    I can’t think of anything NFL related that is more irrelevant than this story.

    If he’s suspended 5 games or not, what is the impact either way?

    Answer: There is no impact

  4. hobartbaker says: Sep 4, 2011 1:07 PM

    I think it’s “Brett Favre Syndrome” being applied to Pryor. The media changes it’s storyline more often than they change socks, and the blame is laid on the subject of their obsession. Favre could take a vow of silence, live by it for a year, and still be accused of waffling. Same situation here. Pryor has said very little, but the media keeps throwing out false information, (LIKE THE BULLSH*T WONDERLIC SCORE from Bob McGinn), and he is perceived as changing his tune all the time.

  5. jh500 says: Sep 4, 2011 1:11 PM

    He shouldn’t have been suspended in the first place.

  6. joetoronto says: Sep 4, 2011 1:31 PM

    It’s only a mess if you listen to the mess master himself, Adam Schefter.

  7. t16rich says: Sep 4, 2011 1:36 PM

    Kid should just serve it and end it. But this suspension is stupid based off the fact Pete Caroll gets to walk around Seattle and act like he was never around for the USC problem. And the same thing will apply when Jim Tressell gets an assistants job in the NFL and gets no punishment. So lets suspend a kid, but the coaches who mentor them and cover up the allegations can come back scotch free. Stupid stuff. I hate USC and I hate even more the way Pete Caroll left them. Guy is a lying coward.

  8. tampajoey says: Sep 4, 2011 1:41 PM

    I’m not a Pryor fan or Oakland fan, BUT Pryor should appeal his suspension, and it should be dismissed. It’s a dangerous precedent allowing the NCAA nazis to dictate punishments in the NFL. The NCAA is already ruining college football. Keep their BS out of the NFL!

  9. scudbot says: Sep 4, 2011 2:01 PM

    The tension is unbearable.

  10. kevinfromth says: Sep 4, 2011 2:04 PM

    It’s pretty clear to me, especially with the appeal coming so soon after Tressel skated into the Colts job free and easy.

    The NFL should either suspend both Pryor and Tressel the same amount of games, or forget suspending either of them.

    I’m pro suspension, but you can’t give the coach a pass and shiv the player.

  11. huthuthut says: Sep 4, 2011 2:06 PM

    Cornwall was interviewed by ESPN radio in LA when Pryor’s acceptance into the supplemental draft was announced. He said flatly and repeatedly that he and Pryor were not going to appeal the decision. Cornwall noted that his client would still be able to attend team meetings and perform other important functions, just not practice or play with the club that chose him. So its not like he’s sitting at home, he’s got a playbook and access to the coaches – and for a young backup QB that means a lot.

    Sounds like Cornwall was just doing his job by formally reserving the rights of his client, even though there is no intention to do so.

  12. polegojim says: Sep 4, 2011 2:12 PM

    I never weighed in on this topic… and I’m in the minority on this… but the kid forfeited his most critical year of NCAA football, significantly lowered his draft and cash values.

    He’s paid his price… the suspension and bleed-over is ridiculous.

    Mr. Goodell – take care of your own NFL family problems.

    Ok, that’s my take – you can all now stop holding your breath.

  13. bwisnasky says: Sep 4, 2011 2:45 PM

    Where are all the idiots condemning the kid in the last piece for appealing after he said he wouldn’t? It appears it’s a sleazy lawyer and some other players that want him to appeal… and not the kid himself…

  14. thetooloftools says: Sep 4, 2011 3:32 PM

    And the “hot mess” gets hotter.

  15. tommyf15 says: Sep 4, 2011 3:33 PM

    jaggedmark says:

    I can’t think of anything NFL related that is more irrelevant than this story.

    If he’s suspended 5 games or not, what is the impact either way?

    Answer: There is no impact

    You don’t think a precedent of the commissioner suspending players for their conduct in college is impactful?

    Just…wow.

  16. cosmoman11 says: Sep 4, 2011 4:01 PM

    Goodell will lift the suspension of Pryor so it will take the heat off concerning Tressel.

  17. marcsasharc says: Sep 4, 2011 4:46 PM

    this all comes down to the fact that Pryor makes dumb decisions. he makes them on the field and off. he screwed up and apparently he hired an idiot lawyer.

    and if the wonderlic report was false, like the Pitt Gm says, why wouldnt he comment on the actual score? sounds fishy to me.

  18. pec2b says: Sep 4, 2011 4:49 PM

    These players have no regard for their school. They don’t care about a degree. They are just looking for that big NFL paycheck. I know if I broke the law or messed up in school, it would affect my future career. It’s time that athletes are subject to the same rules. Suspended him! Send a message to College players. Break the law, it’s going to haunt you!

  19. pftstory says: Sep 4, 2011 4:54 PM

    He will appeal or he wont. Its only confusing if you care about it before he actually does. It dont matter if we know 2 days or 2 minutes before he does or doesn’t. He either will or he wont. It will happen or it wont. Worry about its effect after he does or does not.

  20. pftstory says: Sep 4, 2011 5:01 PM

    Can you see the possibility of a player opting to “come clean” on violations in the NCAA after the NFL draft, so they can get kicked out of college?
    That is allot of what Pryor did. He agreed to the NCAA suspension with a promise to return if allowed to play the bowl game. Then he sent out his people to talk about all the other violations he committed. So the NCAA would not let him back. That in turn left him eligible for the NFL.

  21. tommyf15 says: Sep 4, 2011 5:10 PM

    pec2b says:
    pec2b says:
    Sep 4, 2011 4:49 PM
    These players have no regard for their school. They don’t care about a degree. They are just looking for that big NFL paycheck. I know if I broke the law or messed up in school, it would affect my future career. It’s time that athletes are subject to the same rules. Suspended him! Send a message to College players. Break the law, it’s going to haunt you!

    Pryor didn’t break any laws, but thanks for the boring, grandmotherly lecture.

  22. nsevh76 says: Sep 5, 2011 1:14 AM

    pec2b says:
    Sep 4, 2011 4:49 PM
    These players have no regard for their school. They don’t care about a degree. They are just looking for that big NFL paycheck. I know if I broke the law or messed up in school, it would affect my future career. It’s time that athletes are subject to the same rules. Suspended him! Send a message to College players. Break the law, it’s going to haunt you!

    I agree with in regards to respect for their school. But he didn’t break a law. You want the NFL to send a message to College players. Why should the NFL punish college players? What about the coach that chose to turn his head and ignore everything?

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