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Three-year StarCaps delay will cost Kevin Williams, Will Smith big money

Michael Vick, Kevin Williams AP

In 2008, Vikings defensive tackle Kevin Williams decided to fight his four-game StarCaps suspension.  He successfully delayed the suspension for three years.  In the end, however, he’ll serve a two-game suspension and give up another two games checks.

Per Tom Pelissero of 1500ESPN.com, it means that Williams will lose 4/17ths of his $6 million base salary, which amounts to $1.41 million.  If, as Pelissero points out, Williams would have accepted the suspension in 2008, he would have lost less.

A lot less.

Williams’ base salary was $1 million in 2008.  A four-game suspension would have cost Williams $235,294.  The difference?  $1.176 million.

And so Williams understandably isn’t happy.  “Two games, of course, is better than four, but to still get a four-game fine is unbelievable,” Williams told Pelissero. “I can’t believe it. We were offered that deal [by the NFL] before and we turned it down.”

On top of the extra $1.176 million in lost game checks, Williams and former Vikings defensive tackle Pat Williams forked over a bunch of money in legal fees.  “I’m not even sure [of the figure],” Williams said. “I can’t even remember how much we paid to be exact. . . .  But it was worth the fight, because it’s going to help future guys out in a similar situations.”

Williams got the official word from the league office on Saturday, when he received the letter via FedEx.  “At the end of the day, you can say from the outside that they cut us a break, but you look close, they’re not putting that out there for the public to see that we’re still going to get fined four games,” Williams said. “Who wants to work for free?”

The amount of the lost pay should be determined by the lesser of the salary earned in the year the infraction occurred and the salary at the time the suspension is finalized.  The current approach serves as a deterrent for star players like Williams to fight a suspension, knowing that delaying the suspension could eventually make the final bill much more expensive.

The same dynamic affects Saints defensive end Will Smith, who like Kevin Williams will receive a base salary of $6 million in 2011 — and thus lose $1.41 million of it.  If the four-game suspension had been enforced in 2008, when Smith’s base salary was only $700,000, he would have lost only $164,000.

Thus, Smith will lose even more money, even though his legal challenge ended in 2009, and the league decided not to suspend him while the Williams case was still pending in Minnesota.

That said, Pat Williams potentially won big.  If his career is over, he’ll never have to pay a dime to the NFL.

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44 Responses to “Three-year StarCaps delay will cost Kevin Williams, Will Smith big money”
  1. proBirdie says: Sep 4, 2011 9:57 AM

    If they hadn’t delayed suspensions early it could have delayed their growth as a players. Their future contracts may not have been as lucrative.

  2. thesmartest1 says: Sep 4, 2011 10:02 AM

    Worth the fight? Lol, I’m sure that’s not what you’re REALLY thinking….

  3. wtfru2 says: Sep 4, 2011 10:05 AM

    It still sucks! Even if the fine was 10 dollars it would be too much, for what those guys did. Getting fined almost 2 mil because you didn’t use the NFL products is a travesty…

  4. canetic says: Sep 4, 2011 10:10 AM

    Boo hoo. You know what costs people a lot of a money? A 9% unemployment rate.

  5. thetechnocrat says: Sep 4, 2011 10:12 AM

    You forgot to factor in the lawyer costs into your calculations.

    Which one was the guy that complained that he had spent more on lawyer fees than the suspension would have taken?

    Seems like all of them lost by trying to fight something that was banned. Just drink gatorade and stop going to gnc to look for an advantage.

  6. jutts says: Sep 4, 2011 10:16 AM

    If you cheat, your gonna get caught. They should have setteled this when it happened. I have no sympathy for these dudes or their agents.

  7. realitypolice says: Sep 4, 2011 10:17 AM

    Maybe it was important to them to keep fighting it because they didn’t do anything wrong.

    It happened so long ago that maybe people have forgotten the details:

    The supplement these guys took contained a banned substance that didn’t appear in the list of ingredients. The NFL knew the supplement contained the banned substance, but the players did not.

    The league did not tell players around the league what they knew about Starcaps, but admitted after these guys tested positive that they knew it contained the banned substance.

    These guys had a case, and did what they thought was right. I’m sure it occurred to them (or at least their agents) that they would be making more money now than they were three years ago, but they obviously decided it was a fight worth fighting.

    Good for them.

  8. welzy says: Sep 4, 2011 10:17 AM

    Williams said. “Who wants to work for free?”

    —————————————–

    I believe there are a whole lot of players from yesterday’s cuts that would be willing to play those 2 games for you Phat Pat. Unbelievable, but some players actually would play for free.

  9. sdw2001 says: Sep 4, 2011 10:27 AM

    Bullsh*t

  10. Carl Gerbschmidt says: Sep 4, 2011 10:27 AM

    If you don’t like it, then don’t cheat.

  11. touchdownroddywhite says: Sep 4, 2011 10:30 AM

    Even if his carreer isn’t over, how can the fine him once he returns to the NFL if he served his punishment while not making any money?

  12. eagleswin says: Sep 4, 2011 10:33 AM

    The amount of the lost pay should be determined by the lesser of the salary earned in the year the infraction occurred and the salary at the time the suspension is finalized. The current approach serves as a deterrent for star players like Williams to fight a suspension, knowing that delaying the suspension could eventually make the final bill much more expensive.

    ——————————————–

    You do realize the league would rather they not fight a suspension?

    That said, the league get’s screwed on Pat Williams so why does the league always need to take the loss?

  13. drstrangelust says: Sep 4, 2011 10:50 AM

    So…when does Clay Matthews start HIS suspension for HGH use? Oh, thats right…the hypocrisy of the NFL rears its ugly head again!

  14. buhbay1c says: Sep 4, 2011 10:52 AM

    Carl Gerbschmidt says:
    If you don’t like it, then don’t cheat.

    Take it easy Carl. I wouldn’t call taking a diuretic cheating. If that’s the case then I guess you could call the packer fans that take them to squeeze into size 48 jeans cheaters too.

  15. voiceofrealism says: Sep 4, 2011 10:54 AM

    Everyone knows that if you take a supplement and don’t know what’s in it, you take the risk of there being a banned substance in it. The players could have asked the NFL if the product was safe or not and saved themselves the wasted fight and money.

  16. bears46 says: Sep 4, 2011 10:56 AM

    All the fine money goes to charity so stop whining, and think about who that money may help…Big babies.

  17. misfit74 says: Sep 4, 2011 11:02 AM

    “That said, Pat Williams potentially won big. If his career is over, he’ll never have to pay a dime to the NFL.”

    That’s it! ONLY do steroids when you are about to retire!

  18. indianheadmeatpackingcompany says: Sep 4, 2011 11:18 AM

    It’s fine to suspend and fine guys for failing the drug test. The only issue with this is that it was not listed on the label so there is no way a person can be expected to know that it was in the supplement they were taking. If it’s not listed on the ingredients, how could you possibly know? Starcaps wasn’t on the NFL’s list of banned substances either. There is NO WAY a person other than the guys who took the supplement could ever prove that the players knowingly took the banned substance. Starcaps needed to be added to list when this came about along with a stern warning. Seems only fair.

  19. textexington says: Sep 4, 2011 11:19 AM

    Packers > Vikings

  20. indianheadmeatpackingcompany says: Sep 4, 2011 11:25 AM

    bears46 says:
    Sep 4, 2011 10:56 AM
    All the fine money goes to charity so stop whining, and think about who that money may help…Big babies.

    ————————————————-

    It’s great that it goes to charity, but if you are the person they are taking money from forcefully and you believe they are doing it for the wrong reason, you would be upset too. It is possible to be mad that they are taking you money but still have the “at least it goes to charity” attitude. It is possible that not all the players involved with this punishment knew what they were taking. It’s also possible that they all knew. Unless somebody is going to admit they knowingly took, there is no way to prove one way or the other.

  21. scarletmacaw says: Sep 4, 2011 11:28 AM

    realitypolice – No one except the players know for sure they took StarCaps, that’s just what they claim. All that’s known for sure is that a banned diruretic was detected in their NFL drug tests. They could have knowing taken the diruretic and then claimed ‘StarCaps!’ after finding out the NFL made a mistake by not listing it.

  22. welzy says: Sep 4, 2011 11:39 AM

    drstrangelust says:Sep 4, 2011 10:50 AM

    So…when does Clay Matthews start HIS suspension for HGH use? Oh, thats right…the hypocrisy of the NFL rears its ugly head again!

    —————————————

    I suppose we might wait until Matthews actually uses HGH and there is proof of it. Last I checked, this is still America.

  23. lexnekst says: Sep 4, 2011 11:39 AM

    Williams said. “Who wants to work for free?”

    ———————————————————-

    I would play football for free. Unfortunately, Mr. Williams, the rest of us have to go to real jobs, where we get paid slightly above free.

  24. lexnekst says: Sep 4, 2011 11:40 AM

    Somewhere, Clay Mathews is biding his time…..and taking HGH.

  25. lexnekst says: Sep 4, 2011 11:42 AM

    “Who wants to work for free?”
    ==================================
    Every free agent trying to make a roster in the preseason.

  26. welzy says: Sep 4, 2011 11:43 AM

    bears46 says:Sep 4, 2011 10:56 AM

    All the fine money goes to charity so stop whining, and think about who that money may help…Big babies.
    ————————————-
    So they get their money back?

  27. lexnekst says: Sep 4, 2011 11:44 AM

    This reminds me of the rich complaining about taxes- If you make enough to where millions of dollars is a PERCENTAGE of your income. I don’t feel sorry for you. My check is $400 (bi-weekly!) and I’d kill to make $6million and pay $1.7 million in fines, and half in taxes, it still equals….MORE THAN $400 EVERY 2 WEEKS!

  28. drstrangelust says: Sep 4, 2011 11:49 AM

    canetic says:
    Sep 4, 2011 10:10 AM
    Boo hoo. You know what costs people a lot of a money? A 9% unemployment rate.
    ————

    Best post of the day!

  29. drstrangelust says: Sep 4, 2011 11:52 AM

    misfit74 says:
    Sep 4, 2011 11:02 AM
    That’s it! ONLY do steroids when you are about to retire!
    —————

    Holy God, are you that much of an Fing idiot? Or are you just an A-hole? Nobody has ever accused him of doing steroids! If you dont know the facts of the case, just stay away from the adult conversations!

  30. deconjonesbitchslap says: Sep 4, 2011 12:00 PM

    so when can we expect Clay Matthews Jr. to get busted? what a mystery it is that he AND cushing test positive before the draft, but magically, those tests are thrown out and everything is just fine. pete carroll would never advocate cheating. I guess I must be a bitter Vikings fan, just jealous. I mean, USC during that decade had the highest standards, and would never, ever cheat on anything…they were boyscouts over there. you look up morals and ethics, USC set those standards.

  31. quirtevans says: Sep 4, 2011 12:12 PM

    They chose to fight it. Sometimes, when you fight, you lose. Football players should understand that as well as anyone.

    The upside would have been no suspension at all. Surely, if they want to take a chance on getting the upside, they have to risk a downside.

  32. ytsejamer1 says: Sep 4, 2011 12:33 PM

    I have been shocked by the NFL’s refusal to let this thing die…they were doggedly determined to fine these guys…and at this point a few years after the fact, what really was the impact to the game? Nothing…they just wanted to prove their point. That’s what grates me about the whole issue.

  33. doe22us says: Sep 4, 2011 12:41 PM

    Booyah exactly what I said, sometimes its better to have lost the war than to drag it on.

  34. kennyrogerschicken says: Sep 4, 2011 12:59 PM

    realitypolice says: Sep 4, 2011 10:17 AM

    Maybe it was important to them to keep fighting it because they didn’t do anything wrong.

    It happened so long ago that maybe people have forgotten the details:

    The supplement these guys took contained a banned substance that didn’t appear in the list of ingredients. The NFL knew the supplement contained the banned substance, but the players did not.

    The league did not tell players around the league what they knew about Starcaps, but admitted after these guys tested positive that they knew it contained the banned substance.

    These guys had a case, and did what they thought was right. I’m sure it occurred to them (or at least their agents) that they would be making more money now than they were three years ago, but they obviously decided it was a fight worth fighting.

    Good for them.

    ———————————————-

    Yeah, good for them. I mean, it’s not like only 5 players out of several hundreds tested positive for something the NFL didn’t let anyone know was banned, right?

    Yeah, good luck arguing that case and winning.

  35. kennyrogerschicken says: Sep 4, 2011 1:08 PM

    deconjonesbitchslap –

    You’re bitter, I get it. Seriously, do any Vikings fans think that maybe, just maybe, Matthews is good because he’s got the pedigree? His dad, his uncle, hell, even his brother is in the NFL. Or is it just the supposed HGH use making him great?

    Nevermind, Vikings fans, I already know your answer.

  36. claymath52 says: Sep 4, 2011 1:34 PM

    Sometimes we reap what we sow. That is the case for Kevin.

  37. scudbot says: Sep 4, 2011 2:09 PM

    drstrangelust wins today’s Viketard Total Hypocrite Award by posting “when does Clay Matthews start HIS suspension for HGH use?” and then mere minutes later assaulted another poster with “If you dont know the facts of the case, just stay away from the adult conversations!”

  38. Land Snark says: Sep 4, 2011 2:59 PM

    @wtfru2

    These guys weren’t suspended for *not* taking NFL approved products.

    They were suspended for having a banned substance in their system.

    It’s completely their fault. There’s a list of banned substances the NFL has published. It’s upon the players to know what their “supplements” contain.

    If they don’t want to go through the trouble of getting it checked out they can stick with EAS, the only NFL approved supplement supplier.

    These guys had to pay more because they fought it rather than taking responsibility for their error.

    I have zero sympathy for them.

  39. truthserum4u says: Sep 4, 2011 5:54 PM

    Couldn’t Williams renegotiate this year’s contract this week, before he starts getting paid on Sunday? The NFL is docing him game day pay checks and he hasn’t started receivig those yet. He could take a salary of say 1 million and the remaining five million adjusted to a bonus. Renegotiating the contract could also help the team with the salary cap.

    Many of you on here are forgetting that one of the players (Duece McAllister I believe) asked about the product via the NFL’s hotline and never got a straight answer.

    Also, the league allowed previous players who tested positive for the same thing to get off without punishment. In the regular working world, non systematic punishment would open up a whole can of worms.

  40. truthserum4u says: Sep 4, 2011 5:57 PM

    @ kennyrogerschicken

    If it were pedigree, why didn’t he play more in high school? Why wasn’t he highly recruited? Why didn’t he start before his final year @ USC? Why did he experience a massive and sudden body change in a short period of time?

    If you’ve got the pedigree then you have the pedigree. The skills are natural and inate, you don’t don’t suddenly develope them so much later in life.

    The story in and around USC was that there were numerous players “enhancing” their bodies and Matthews was among them.

    While people are right, until they catch him he is presumed innocent in a court of law. However, he’s in the court of public opinion, and as many celebrities have found out throughout the years, no such edict exists there.

  41. Carl Gerbschmidt says: Sep 4, 2011 7:52 PM

    buhbay1c says:
    Sep 4, 2011 10:52 AM
    Carl Gerbschmidt says:
    If you don’t like it, then don’t cheat.

    Take it easy Carl. I wouldn’t call taking a diuretic cheating. If that’s the case then I guess you could call the packer fans that take them to squeeze into size 48 jeans cheaters too.

    ______

    yeah, I’m sure they were just trying to lose weight. What are they? High school wrestlers….

  42. mikemcsaint says: Sep 4, 2011 9:02 PM

    i’ll have to hold my breathe while I side with the Viking fans here, but what the NFL did in this situation is even worse than given. Deuce McAlister was also part of this. He called the NFL office before taking the diuretic, as is prescribed by the NFL drug polcy, and was told BY THE NFL, that the no illegal substance was included in the ingredients. Once he took it, it was discovered that, randomly, some bottles contained the banned substance and some did not. The NFL’s response was still,” policy dictates that a player is repsonsible for what he ingests, injects, or otherwise uses.” I am all for the NFL’s stance on PED’s but this case is absurd.

  43. mikemcsaint says: Sep 4, 2011 9:04 PM

    And as far as them trying to loose weight, yes that is what they were trying to do. Almost all NFL players have bonuses tied to reporting weight when training camp starts.

  44. lnfinite says: Sep 4, 2011 10:15 PM

    Huge fine for using water pills…. Just another way the Vikes get screwed over by the NFL. Replay goofs and uncalled penalties and when all else fails find a scapegoat in purple.

    Get bent Goddell..

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