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Aaron Rodgers says league deserves some of the blame for Johnny Jolly

Packers' Rodgers run for a touchdown against the Broncos in the first half during their NFL football game in Green Bay Reuters

Over the weekend, Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly was arrested for the fourth time on drug charges.  On Tuesday, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers spoke out in support of Jolly, who has been indefinitely suspended by the league.

It’s just disappointing,” Rodgers told Jason Wilde of ESPN Milwaukee, via SportsRadioInterviews.com.  “And I’ll be honest, I think the league deserves some of the blame in this case.  When you look at some of the other guys that have been reinstated in the league after jail sentences, and justly, rightly so, Johnny didn’t serve any days in prison, sat out for a year and still couldn’t get his case heard, from what I was told.  I just think that that’s wrong. . . .  I think the Commissioner’s done a great job of cleaning up some of the stuff in the league.  That said, if you take a guy away from his support system . . . I don’t think that’s helping.”

Because the league attempts to maintain confidential on matters of this nature, it’s unclear why Jolly has been suspended indefinitely.  It’s possible that he tested positive for a banned recreational drug while in Stage 3 of the substance abuse program.  It’s possible that he failed to show up for a test while in Stage 3.  It’s possible that he otherwise failed to comply with the terms of his treatment plan while in Stage 3.  Unless the league provides the details (it can’t) or Jolly chooses to do so (to date, he hasn’t), there’s no way to know what specifically resulted in the suspension.

That said, Rodgers’ point is a valid one — and it’s one that his predecessor once made regarding former Packers receiver Koren Robinson.  Banishing a guy from his team puts him in position to potentially get in trouble again.  And that’s what happened to Jolly.

Still, there’s likely a lot more to the story.  And the details may never surface.

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123 Responses to “Aaron Rodgers says league deserves some of the blame for Johnny Jolly”
  1. kayotiicdat says: Oct 5, 2011 3:09 PM

    Yea it’s the leagues fault, are you on drugs too?? Moron

  2. medtxpack says: Oct 5, 2011 3:10 PM

    sucks for it happening, JJ really does have a problem if he keeps doing it. the news report i saw said they were pulled over because an occupant in the car littered out the window. stupid stupid stupid

  3. jdandcoke says: Oct 5, 2011 3:10 PM

    sorry….just cant buy into the idea that the nfl is responsible for the actions of any of its players. last i checked they were all adults. as adults they get to make their own decisions in life….and suffer the consequences of bad ones. maybe im alone here….but i kill myself working 80 hours a week to make sure my wife and kids have a roof over their heads and food onthe table, like im sure many posters here have to do…..its impossible for me to feel sorry for a clown like johnny jolly.

  4. favreforever says: Oct 5, 2011 3:13 PM

    But Jolly Johnny wasn’t having difficulty getting in trouble while he was with the team. Somehow he found the time.

  5. pigskinswag says: Oct 5, 2011 3:13 PM

    Roger Goodell: Johnny Jolly answer me! Who taught you how to do this stuff?

    Jolly: YOU ALRIGHT! I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!!

  6. gregjennings85 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:14 PM

    Rodgers – Intelligent.
    JUDAS – Dense.

  7. benh999 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:14 PM

    What are these guys, children? Maybe if they weren’t coddled so much in the first place, they would be able to function without being under team supervision.

  8. favreforever says: Oct 5, 2011 3:14 PM

    Maybe he was suspended for blowing off little old ladies with cancer wanting his autograph.

  9. jessieboom says: Oct 5, 2011 3:15 PM

    Yea NFL, stop selling Jolly drugs!!!

  10. shaggytoodle says: Oct 5, 2011 3:15 PM

    I think Rodgers does have a good point, but Jolly had MULTIPLE chances to get set himself straight.

    I really don’t know if Jolly didn’t get a fair shake like the Plaxico’s or Vick’s. I wasn’t there, but I do think the Packers are missing Jolly’s skillset atleast before the suspension on the DL.

  11. hoobsher says: Oct 5, 2011 3:16 PM

    well, think about it.

    vick was arrested once and served a year and a half in prison and was deemed rehabilitated by the state and by the league.

    jolly (lol) was arrested 4 times, for the same thing, and served 0 years, therefore giving him no reason to stop.

  12. 2chronix7 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:16 PM

    Much respect to Aaron Rodgers for having the balls to speak out for a team mate and for what he thinks is right. Aaron Rodgers has nothing to gain from speaking out and it would be safer and easier for him to say nothing.

    Not only is he the best football player in the world right now, he is a good team mate too.

  13. packattack1967 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:16 PM

    Good reference to the Robinson story. I’m sure there is a file on Jolly we’ll never see. It’s sad and an incredible waste nonetheless.

  14. Tadd says: Oct 5, 2011 3:16 PM

    Yeah Jolly has been a fool but Rodgers just said something I have always kind of thought. Its a shame really.

    Maybe if the Packers still hold his rights we can trade him to Oakland, he would fit right in there.

  15. philtration says: Oct 5, 2011 3:17 PM

    Poor Johnny Jolly.

    Had to go it on his own just like he was an average, every day person.
    Screwed up his job and was forced to support himself just like any other person would have to do.
    He is actually paying a price for his own stupidity and it is some how the league’s fault because they did not give him millions of dollars to keep him in the lifestyle that he was accustomed to.
    Like this would happen to you or me with our place of employment.

    Instead of asking why Jolly did not get a slap on the wrist Rodgers should be asking why the other turds in the league did.

  16. chetwynnr says: Oct 5, 2011 3:18 PM

    Manning up should apply to your off-field activities as well as what you do on the field. You don’t hit women (or anyone outside of football). You take care of your body. You take care of your family. Most NFL players manage to do pretty well but maybe there should be some sort of adult care facility for those who can’t seem to manage on their own.

  17. butternutzz says: Oct 5, 2011 3:18 PM

    Guess what? If I don’t adhere to my company’s substance abuse policy I wont get my job back. I’m tired of excuses for ignorant people. You had a great opportunity and you blew it. That’s life my friend.

  18. philyeagles5 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:18 PM

    maybe the NFL doesnt want drug dealers in their league.

  19. dohpey28 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:19 PM

    He doesn’t have a valid point. It’s not the NFL’s fault he has been a repeat offender enough times to get suspended indefinitely. The system was there for him to take advantage of the 1st and 2nd time he failed. It was Jolly’s choice to continue down that road, and to this day to make the dumb decisions he always had.

  20. dfeltz says: Oct 5, 2011 3:19 PM

    Boo hoo. A grown man has made not 1, not 2, not 3 but 4 “mistakes.” That isn’t an accident, that’s a habit. Support system or not. Feel free to take a little accountability and responsibility for your own actions.

  21. m2karateman says: Oct 5, 2011 3:20 PM

    Sorry, not buying it. Jolly is a professional football player and is supposed to be a man. If he can’t stay away from the drugs, that isn’t the fault of the league. That’s the fault of himself.

    I’m tired of this “it’s not my fault”, or “it’s not his fault” mentality in the world today. Johnny Jolly made poor choices, not the NFL. At least, not in this case.

  22. kingmj4891 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:20 PM

    Karon Rodgers needs to shut up, Jolly is never playing a down in the NFL again.

  23. swagjag says: Oct 5, 2011 3:21 PM

    Last I checked he’s a grown ass man Aaron. Don’t blame the league. He should know better than to mess with sizzurp.

  24. bozosforall says: Oct 5, 2011 3:22 PM

    gregjennings85 says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:14 PM
    Rodgers – Intelligent.
    JUDAS – Dense.

    __
    gregjennings85 – Wearing kneepads at the feet of ARodge, covered in splooge.

    Dude, STFU with the “JUDAS” crap. Makes you look even more bitter than you probably are.

  25. mikeheruki says: Oct 5, 2011 3:22 PM

    You are kidding me. Why doesn’t Aaron take his TEAM to task for not assigning a bodyguard to watch this addict 24/7. The league?? They kept letting him come back. Where in the real world can you fail multiple drug tests or have multiple drug arrests and still have a job? Not at any of my employers. This guy obviously needed more help than the team was willing to give him.

  26. NoWearMan says: Oct 5, 2011 3:22 PM

    Really Aaron?

    Was it the leagues fault the first THREE times?

    This is NOT a valid point by ANY stretch. There are people in society every day who don’t get busted FOUR TIMES on drug charges.

    There is one person at fault here, and it’s Johnny Jolly.

    I Have Spoken.

  27. fatcamper says: Oct 5, 2011 3:23 PM

    I respectfully disagree, but think it’s nice Rodgers goes to bat for a teammate when they’re down.

    As for Jolly, it seems like another case where there is a lack of personal responsibility. It’s selfish that he has guys like Rodgers who have his back and he abuses their trust. He obviously can’t be counted on and deserves what he gets from here out.

  28. bostonbias says: Oct 5, 2011 3:23 PM

    Sounds like someone had a Cal education….(not a positive thing btw)…..Rodgers needs to live in the real world. It is not your boss’s fault if you do drugs…many many many times ..after they try to give you help.

  29. ruvelligwebuike says: Oct 5, 2011 3:26 PM

    I don’t know. Part of me agrees with Rodgers. Seriously, Donte Stallworth killed a guy and got the same suspension.

    The other part of me thinks Jolly is a worthless piece of ghetto trash that will never amount to anything no matter what, so why try?

  30. pigskinswag says: Oct 5, 2011 3:26 PM

    Maybe Rodgers has a point. After all, everyone deserves a first…um…second…er…third….umm…forty-seventh chance.

  31. glac1 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:26 PM

    He made his own nest. Now, it’s time to move on.

  32. scoops1 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:26 PM

    philyeagles5 says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:18 PM
    maybe the NFL doesnt want drug dealers in their league.

    ————–

    but they will gladly accept players who get behind the wheel and kill someone while intoxicated…..

  33. bombayjon says: Oct 5, 2011 3:28 PM

    If your work place is your only system of support, you really need to re-evaluate the importance of God and family in your life.

    Besides, you have to take someone like that OUT OF THE LEAUGE before he influences other players and starts poisening the rest of the team.

  34. scudbot says: Oct 5, 2011 3:28 PM

    You guys who change AR’s name to something female, do your mommies let you stay up on on Mondays to watch football?

  35. packerrube13 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:28 PM

    I see Rodger’s point, but you can’t make excuses for the guy. Support system or not, if he wants an NFL career, he needs to set aside the drugs. Whether he’s alone, or with 60 guys on a football field daily, he needs to be stronger on his own.

    4 arrests on drug charges?! There is no excuse to be made here for that. He is who he is, and whether or not he was playing football and around his teammates, he would be doing the same things. I like the guy, but you can’t make excuses for someone that unintelligent.

  36. vikingdoode says: Oct 5, 2011 3:31 PM

    ahhh finally drama in Green Bay rather here in Minneapolis….Sad for the person Jolly dude man you have such a short NFL career. Sad, hoping you can find sobriety this coming from a Viking fan…

  37. rodgerthat says: Oct 5, 2011 3:31 PM

    This is all really meaningless…… The least of his worries is the suspension by the NFL. The only thing on his mind is what they have to “drank” in prison.

  38. tedknight40 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:33 PM

    Aaron is speaking as though Jolly is ENTITLED to his “support system”, when in reality it is a PRIVILEGE to in his “support system”.

    There are many players that are in the “program” and get to a point where they understand what a PRIVILEGE it is to have a support system in place to help them through, but they also adhere to whatever rules that are set to continuing earning the PRIVILEGE.

    As each of us that has a valid drivers licenses knows, driving is not a right but a PRIVILEGE!

  39. zoellner25 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:34 PM

    A-Rod’s point was that suspended guys should be able to be at team facilities, for camraderie, access to staff, etc, and not banished from the team. He was OK with the suspension, but not the exile. and he’s right. I’m not saying Jolly doesn’t deserve what he got, but suspended guys should be able to contact the team at least.

  40. Cowboys-Forum says: Oct 5, 2011 3:35 PM

    whaaaaaaaaaa!!! im a grown man and i need someone to make the right decisions for me whaaaaaaaaaaa!!!

    Grow up Rodgers, Jolly made his bed, let him sleep in it.

  41. bombayjon says: Oct 5, 2011 3:37 PM

    Tadd says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:16 PM
    Yeah Jolly has been a fool but Rodgers just said something I have always kind of thought. Its a shame really.

    Maybe if the Packers still hold his rights we can trade him to Oakland, he would fit right in there.

    ———————————————

    Really, Tadd? Your guy gets arrested and you want to turn it into a shot against The Raiders. Check the ‘Turd Watch’ tab and you will see that The Packers are listed more often then The Raiders. We have had our fair share of arrests (none of which I would defend because there should be ZERO arrests), but I’m pretty sure we have less than the average.

  42. herlies says: Oct 5, 2011 3:39 PM

    Once suspended, you are not allowed back into team facilities. Basically you are banned until reinstated, right?

    For players with obvious drug and alcohol issues, being in a strong locker room culture every day probably has more positive effect on that player than simply telling him to take a hike and figure it out on his own. Especially when teammates and the organization are willing to help.

    The Packers probably wanted Jolly in house everyday but the league does not allow it. It’s not the league’s fault, as Jolly made his own decisions.

  43. vadog says: Oct 5, 2011 3:39 PM

    Oh good grief!! What is it with these Green Bay qb’s??

    Every recovery program, from any kind of substance abuse, will tell the person that recovery starts when they can admit to themselves that they are responsible for their behavior! The NFL doesn’t owe Jolly anything. If Jolly wants to reenter the league let him begin by earning the leagues trust.

  44. ishoulbeagm says: Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM

    If I get suspended from work for failing a drug test, I can’t go hang out on the jobsite to stay out of trouble! If my employer chooses to give me a second chance, the employment opportunity should be good enough for me to stay clean and get my job back!

  45. nflofficeadmin says: Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM

    Some real uninformed opinions here that appear to not really understand some fundamental things about addiction and substance abuse. What a shame…

    On another note… Great example of leadership here by Rodgers. This is sort of the opposite of what Eli would do for a teammate that finds himself in trouble. Plaxico is still waiting for a letter…

  46. dellied says: Oct 5, 2011 3:42 PM

    Lol it’s hilarious how you morons read the title, skip the article, and then comment on things never said.

    Rodgers isn’t blaming the league for Jolly taking drugs. He’s basically asserting that separating the guy away from a potential support system doesn’t help him either. In the end, the NFL still looks bad when former players act like this.

    Like 99% of the other article titles in the sensationalized medium of sports journalism, Rodgers didn’t even come close to blaming the NFL for Jolly’s problem.

    You all can listen to the ESPN Milwaukee interview with Rodgers. It’s as plain as day what he’s actually saying, and it’s not “blaming” the NFL for Jolly’s problems.

  47. contra74 says: Oct 5, 2011 3:43 PM

    Yea Aaron, its also medicines fault that it couldnt cure cancer because if it did then you wouldnt have been pegged as bad guy for walking past a cancer survivor who was looking for your autograph.

  48. bombayjon says: Oct 5, 2011 3:45 PM

    fatcamper says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:23 PM
    I respectfully disagree, but think it’s nice Rodgers goes to bat for a teammate when they’re down.

    ————————————-

    Well said, fatcamper. There is way to much disrespect in our society, especially on the www. Thanks for being a gentleman. And I agree with both of your points.

  49. irishgary says: Oct 5, 2011 3:47 PM

    Did most of you miss the part where Rodgers said the league deserves SOME of the blame? Some comprehension issues on this site.

  50. youdownwithjpp says: Oct 5, 2011 3:48 PM

    kayotiicdat says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:09 PM
    Yea it’s the leagues fault, are you on drugs too?? Moron

    ————————————–

    Rodgers has more intellect in a flake of dandruff than you have in your entire head.

    Which is why he is a class act super bowl MVP champion, Moron.

  51. skoobyfl says: Oct 5, 2011 3:48 PM

    Jolly said he’s clean unless your buying.

  52. packfaninpackland says: Oct 5, 2011 3:48 PM

    Not surprised at all that this story was generated out of a Jason Wilde butt-kissing Q&A with Rodgers.

    Wilde is such an ass-kisser to anything Rodgers says and does that it isn’t even funny.

    At least he isn’t at the Wisonsin State Journal anymore, and is at some web site that about 80 people read, and on a radio show that, literally, no one listens to. I mean his ratings waiver between a 0.0 and 0.1 it sooooo bad.

  53. getweird4u says: Oct 5, 2011 3:49 PM

    You have a chance to make millions of $ and fulfill a lifelong dream….STOP USING it is nobody’s fault but his own.

  54. rexismybff says: Oct 5, 2011 3:49 PM

    Its called personal responsibility, Aaron. Something you and Brett apparently know nothing about, and the reason you will never be a leader, and why you will never win a real Super Bowl that isn’t handed to you by Kemeauotu and Mendenhall.

  55. bombayjon says: Oct 5, 2011 3:51 PM

    nflofficeadmin says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM
    Some real uninformed opinions here that appear to not really understand some fundamental things about addiction and substance abuse. What a shame…

    ——————————————

    Really? Most of them sounded pretty informed to me. “Personal responsibilty” and “admitting you have a problem” were the common themes. Is that not fundamental in addiction and substance abuse treatment?

  56. rbirving says: Oct 5, 2011 3:52 PM

    It’s a league that creates drug addicts.

    In pain? take a shot, pop a pill, get back in the game.

    Once addicted, common sense evaporates. I agree with Rodgers in that it makes no sense to separate the addict from a potential source of support.

    No, Jolly doesn’t deserve a spot on the roster, but access to the training staff and coaches could help the kid get back on track. Nothing is served by cutting him off from that sort of support unless that’s what the team wants to do.

    If they want to continue to help the kid, they should be able to, since they are partly to blame for the addiction in the first place.

  57. capslockkey says: Oct 5, 2011 3:52 PM

    Yeah, it’s the league’s fault the guy was a repeat offender and earned his way to a year long vacation. I understand the guy is/was your teammate, but he brought it on himself and it’s not the league’s responsibility to reinstate him simply because he can’t help himself from committing crimes when he’s not playing/practicing.

    I’m sure there were outlets of help the league provides that he simply didn’t take advantage of. If you are so concerned about Jolly’s well being and his addiction problem, then why didn’t YOU or some of your teammates intervene?

  58. capslockkey says: Oct 5, 2011 3:53 PM

    “You all can listen to the ESPN Milwaukee interview with Rodgers. It’s as plain as day what he’s actually saying, and it’s not “blaming” the NFL for Jolly’s problems.”I guess you missed this line from the interview:

    “And I’ll be honest, I think the league deserves some of the blame in this case.”

  59. peytonwantsaflag says: Oct 5, 2011 3:55 PM

    “Banishing a guy from his team puts him in position to potentially get in trouble again.”

    unless of course he makes a concerted effort to clean up, maybe goes out and gets another job like anybody else that gets canned would do.

    Oh I forgot these footballers shouldn’t ever have to work anywhere else again once they make it all the way to the N F L.

    gimme a break.

  60. doe22us says: Oct 5, 2011 3:55 PM

    Hey simple, he choose purple drank over a very lucrative career case closed. Or sipping Sizzzurp

  61. Carl Gerbschmidt says: Oct 5, 2011 3:56 PM

    Rodgers is standing behind his teammate. As any good leader should do. I think you vike fans might be too used to Mcnabb already, so you don’t recognize good leadership when you see it.

  62. nflofficeadmin says: Oct 5, 2011 3:56 PM

    Besides, you’re only allowed to abuse cocaine and other drugs freely if you are the owner or boss of the company… Those are the rules.

  63. packfaninpackland says: Oct 5, 2011 3:57 PM

    To; nflofficeadmin at

    “Some real uninformed opinions here that appear to not really understand some fundamental things about addiction and substance abuse. What a shame…”
    —– Like any addiction, recovery from it HAS to begin with one’s self – NOT expecting handouts from other people. Geesh.

    “On another note… Great example of leadership here by Rodgers. ”
    —– No it’s not. Rodgers is blaming everyone BUT Jolly. Sorry, but after getting busted 3 or 4 times now for the exact … same … thing, the blame falls squarely on himself. And only himself.

  64. firethorn1001 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:00 PM

    “Every recovery program, from any kind of substance abuse, will tell the person that recovery starts when they can admit to themselves that they are responsible for their behavior!”

    I don’t think there is any recovery program that tells you that you can’t contact your friends, family and co-workers. If they did, I’m not sure alot of people recovering would have alot of success.

    That was Aaron’s point.

  65. charism4 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:02 PM

    By now, if you’ve read through everyone’s posts. You probably noticed there sure are a lot of idiots on here, starting with the author of the article.

    Rodgers said the league deserves SOME of the blame, I’m sure he’d tell you it is still Jolly’s fault. But by taking away Jolly’s support system, they certainly didn’t help.

    kayotiicdat says: Oct 5, 2011 3:09 PM

    Yea it’s the leagues fault, are you on drugs too?? Moron
    ___________________
    Everyone that disliked your post thinks that you are the moron.

  66. shieldsisland37 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:03 PM

    Oh please. He is a grown man who is responsible for his life. Dont want to lose your job? Dont want to go to jail? Dont do drugs. Ok, Welcome to the real world.

  67. favreforever says: Oct 5, 2011 4:05 PM

    Jolly Johnny and Waaaaahhjahs don’t think the league gives the players sufficient warning time to deal with the drug tests. I mean, it takes more than a couple days for that stuff to get out of your system. Geez!

  68. wethog66 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:09 PM

    NFL Players are adults. Why is it someone elses fault that they don’t act like it?

  69. hystoracle says: Oct 5, 2011 4:09 PM

    this is the same support system that was there the first 3 times he got in trouble and didn’t do much to stop him from doing it a 4th time. If you break the rules and get suspended from your job, then you don’t get the ability to come back to work until your suspension is over.. that’s the way it works. If you want to play football don’t do drugs… or at least don’t get caught doing drugs. There are consequences to the choices we make and the things we do.

  70. falconsfan says: Oct 5, 2011 4:11 PM

    So where are the rest of Jolly family or his friends? I understand being part of a team is helpful but doesn’t this guy have friends and family outside of football?

  71. murphyov says: Oct 5, 2011 4:11 PM

    In the article above a quote from Rodgers clearly says the NFL deserves “some of the blame”. Plain as day.

    I’m glad Rodgers has the stones to state his opinions because in order to protect his “brand” Roger Goodell has seemingly become an iron-fisted dictator. However, it doesn’t seem like anybody really knows anything about Jolly’s situation, so we can’t really assign blame. I’ve never been addicted to drugs, and it’s unfortunate for anyone that is – I refuse to pile on insults. I hope people can do whatever it takes to get control.

  72. ravenfan820 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:13 PM

    Here is what I know to be true….If I fail one drug test for the corporation I worked for I am fired, period. No second chances, no suspensions, etc…. I am gone….that is how it is in the real world…..football players should be no different…..

  73. favreforever says: Oct 5, 2011 4:15 PM

    After rigorous self examination, the league fined itself 100,000 dollars over the incident. 50 grand for letting a dope like Jolly into the league in the first place, and 50 grand for letting a dope like Rodgers become it’s poster boy.

  74. flyboy123456 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:16 PM

    Rodgers, play football, that’s what you’re good at. Isn’t anyone accountable any more? What the hell is going on with this pussification of America?? I’m sick of it. He’s an adult and he should act like one. How many guys get to that level?? He won the lottery, so-to-speak and he blew it…not the NFL.

    Maybe Rodgers should set-up a chain of day care centers to take care of the players in the offseason.

    Mr. Rodgers Neighborhood Day Care Centers of America.

  75. thejuddstir says: Oct 5, 2011 4:17 PM

    I think the NFL should drug test Rodgers, me thinks he must’ve got ahold of some of JJ’s purple drank. The idea that it’s the NFL’s fault for taking him away from his “support group”, cry me a river!! If this had ANY merit, then every felon that’s locked up could make the same asinine claim……”they were taken away from their support group”. My 8 yr. old has more accountability and takes more responsibility than any NFL player does and that now includes Rodgers. I have always liked Rodgers but his statements on this issue are idiotic. Truth be known, I bet Johnny Jolly has been given more chances than the average felon but yet he hasn’t learned……he’s missing his “support group” LOL Rodgers just lost a lot of cred with me.

  76. neer music says: Oct 5, 2011 4:17 PM

    purple drank + houston + illegal = typical instance.

  77. cosanostra71 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:20 PM

    Yes, the league does have some responsibility to help it’s employees with problems like this. But let’s get real. You can only help a person so much before they have to start taking some responsibility for themselves. And after four drug arrests, the only person left that can help Johnny Jolly is Johnny Jolly.

  78. silverdeer says: Oct 5, 2011 4:22 PM

    @dellied, I agree with some of what you said, but not all. I agree that Rodgers isn’t blaming the league for him taking drugs. However, he is blaming the league for taking away his “support”. What I find difficult in your argument is that by comparing him to Vick and Burress he is in fact stating that he would have been better off had he been incarcerated for his issues. Not sure, but it seems that Rodgers (with his comments) is insinuating that the NFL has support groups within the prison systems of the U.S. If that is the case then the NFL has some issues that are being brought to light that none of us as fans were aware of.

  79. polishrod says: Oct 5, 2011 4:23 PM

    So, Aaron, do you plan on paying Jolly his salary until the day he dies? Or should we just not care what happens to him after he’s done playing football? Because according to AR, this guy needs a support system to stay on track. Retiring or finishing his NFL career w/o a support system means he’ll end up selling nitrous balloons to teenagers at the County Fair.

    I mean, why should anyone in the NFL be expected to grow up and act like an adult?

    Ohhhh, that’s right, out in La-La Land (known as Green Bay) the entire universe is centered around the Packers.

    Worst part about his dumb comments are that this guy has now had 4 different chances and dropped the ball on all of them.

  80. thejuddstir says: Oct 5, 2011 4:24 PM

    dellied says, “You all can listen to the ESPN Milwaukee interview with Rodgers. It’s as plain as day what he’s actually saying, and it’s not “blaming” the NFL for Jolly’s problems”………………..A. Rodgers says, “And I’ll be honest, I think the league deserves some of the blame in this case”
    What part of his quote don’t you understand dellied?????? Only a Packer fan would attempt to take out of context what a Packer player was quoted as saying…….”potato potatoe” it’s the same freaking thing.

  81. zaggs says: Oct 5, 2011 4:25 PM

    “Banishing a guy from his team puts him in position to potentially get in trouble again.”

    So you are saying that the players are children that need to be looked after constantly? They’re adults! Also the league forces them into substance abuse treatment does it not? So no, not the leagues fault.

  82. polishrod says: Oct 5, 2011 4:27 PM

    dellied says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:42 PM
    Lol it’s hilarious how you morons read the title, skip the article, and then comment on things never said.

    Rodgers isn’t blaming the league for Jolly taking drugs. He’s basically asserting that separating the guy away from a potential support system doesn’t help him either. In the end, the NFL still looks bad when former players act like this.

    Like 99% of the other article titles in the sensationalized medium of sports journalism, Rodgers didn’t even come close to blaming the NFL for Jolly’s problem.

    You all can listen to the ESPN Milwaukee interview with Rodgers. It’s as plain as day what he’s actually saying, and it’s not “blaming” the NFL for Jolly’s problems.

    ———-

    Nice spin, but did you miss this part??? I mean, how much of a Homer do you have to be to ignore the OBVIOUS VERBAL statements.

    “And I’ll be honest, I think the league deserves some of the blame in this case. “

  83. jazz321 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:27 PM

    I just want to know how often Aaron Rodgers visited with Jolly during the off season to try and help him. During the lock out, did Mr. Rogers ever reach out and help Jolly? He had a lot of time on his hands since there was a lock out and there were no voluntary workouts.

    Aaron and his team mates should have been helping this man during the off season. His support group should be his every day friends and not his “in football season” friends.

    Quit blaming personal problems, that were likely started outside of football, on the NFL. The NFL is a business but not a baby sitting business. Jolly has an agent and probably enough money to pay for good medical treatment. If he wanted to be clean, he would be. Mr. Jolly chooses his life.

  84. pftisahalftruth says: Oct 5, 2011 4:28 PM

    there is more to it…he’s been selling this crap for a LONG time. the team knew about it and warned him MULTIPLE times to knock this crap off, and to break ties from his old pals in the Houston 5th ward, but he wouldn’t do it. ultimately it cost him millions of $$$.

  85. ishallcomment says: Oct 5, 2011 4:30 PM

    are you guys dumb?

    he isn’t blaming the NFL for Jolly being a screw up, he’s saying that the NFL should have programs in place to support/help people with problems rather than.

    suspension—>cut—>unemployed—>more trouble

    thats what i gathered anyway

  86. pappysarcasm says: Oct 5, 2011 4:31 PM

    Man, do any of you losers work?!?! or do you simply just collect welfare and complain like the rest of the lib losers in this world?!?!?

  87. wafflestomp says: Oct 5, 2011 4:32 PM

    As I have stated on these boards numerous times, playing in the NFL is not a God givin right.

    By nature of the job, You Are A Role Model. It comes with signing the contract. You represent a lucrative organization. I honestly believe these players should be held to a higher standard.

    Yes, people make mistakes, everbody is human, please save me the drivel, but with the benifits and spoils there should be consequences.

    Having said all of this, I am a huge Packers fan, have been for over 40 years and I am obviously a big supporter of Aaron Rodgers but, I can’t back his argument about Jolly.

  88. dukemarc says: Oct 5, 2011 4:34 PM

    ravenfan820 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:13 PM

    Here is what I know to be true….If I fail one drug test for the corporation I worked for I am fired, period. No second chances, no suspensions, etc…. I am gone….that is how it is in the real world…..football players should be no different…..
    ————————————————

    Does your job contribute significantly to generating hundred of millions of dollars for your employer each year? No? Do you see the difference? Your job is not equal to an NFL players, so stop using that line of reasoning.

  89. packerfantastic says: Oct 5, 2011 4:39 PM

    The point Rodgers is making is that if a player is suspended, the team can have no contact, and therefore offer no support to the individual. Instead, that individual is place in the situation where he is likely to spend more time with the wrong people doing the wrong things. I don’t blame the NFL. Jolly is responsible for his choices and now has to deal with the consequences of those choices. Yet, it would be good measure for the NFL to provide some level of support in these cases to help the individuals be influenced in a more positive way, especially since they have already proved they will make the wrong choice when left to their own devices.

  90. chobes68 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:39 PM

    As a Bear’s fan, I really enjoy watching Rodgers play, but he’s wrong on this.

    Saying that by not reinstating him, the league is further exacerbating the problem, is like saying KFC is wrong for firing a guy selling dime bags.

    If Jolly would have been reinstated, there’s no guarantee that he would have ceased doing what he’s been doing.

  91. jigwig13 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:44 PM

    In my opinion…I think taking someone from there support system is wrong its like sending them to the wolves…certain ppl needs that help and some ppl don’t..in any case u can’t take an addict away from their support system if u do there is a great chance they will use again its not a quick process and a couple of session it takes time…a lot. Of these players come in at 21 and 22 yrs old there over age but there not men yet guys don’t really mature until about 25 so alittle more help would be. Nice for them…with that being said the nfl should take alittle responsibility with helping there players succeed in life outside of football

  92. packerjb says: Oct 5, 2011 4:48 PM

    Maybe if Aaaron had not been wasting his time worrying about idiots like Johhny Jolly he would have won a Super Bowl in 2008 or 2009 like Brent suggested.

  93. scudbot says: Oct 5, 2011 4:48 PM

    This is getting pretty funny. These posts that are tangential to the game turn into henhouse battles among commenters. Name calling, foot stomping, hair pulling.

    Anyway Zombo’s back at practice today.

  94. farmmbig says: Oct 5, 2011 4:57 PM

    As Judge Smails once stated, “The World needs ditchdiggers too!” at Danny Noonan (Caddyshack)

    I wonder if Aaron Rodgers feels as bad for the numerous other druggies that can’t clean THEMSELVES up in order to maintain a job.

    Just focus on throwing the football, dummy.

  95. jobotjones says: Oct 5, 2011 5:01 PM

    . . I think the Commissioner’s done a great job of cleaning up some of the stuff in the league. That said, if you take a guy away from his support system . . . I don’t think that’s helping.”
    ———-
    Translation: violators should be suspended just not when they play for my team.

  96. howley1 says: Oct 5, 2011 5:01 PM

    I say the Packers deserve some of the blame for drafting a druggie.

  97. jabroni1 says: Oct 5, 2011 5:01 PM

    It couldn’t be because of his 3rd drug arrest in 3 years last monday could it? Mystery solved Inspector Clousseau

  98. jasncondit says: Oct 5, 2011 5:02 PM

    Wow Favre was right about teaching Rodgers everything he knows. He taught him to say stupid crap at random times just like Brett did. Or maybe it was the concussion we gave him near the end of the regular season last year. Goooooooooooooooooooo Lions!

  99. voiceofrealism says: Oct 5, 2011 5:04 PM

    I think Rodgers’ words are slightly off. Whether or not being with his teammates would have helped Jolly’s willpower, it’s not the leagues responsibility to babysit it’s players. In the end it was Jolly’s fault he couldn’t control himself.

  100. packerfantastic says: Oct 5, 2011 5:04 PM

    hystoracle says: Oct 5, 2011 4:09 PM

    this is the same support system that was there the first 3 times he got in trouble and didn’t do much to stop him from doing it a 4th time. If you break the rules and get suspended from your job, then you don’t get the ability to come back to work until your suspension is over.. that’s the way it works. If you want to play football don’t do drugs… or at least don’t get caught doing drugs. There are consequences to the choices we make and the things we do.

    ————————————-

    I agree there are consequences to the things we do, but let’s say we are not talking about a professional football player. Let’s say we are talking about a software developer in a high tech firm. If he was arrested (not jailed) for an instance like this, would his company legally be able to suspend him until the legal system ran its course. Beyond that, would he not only not be allowed to work for his current employer, but also no other employer in the entire high tech industry?

    I get the NFL wanting to clean up the image and take a stand against this stuff, but in some regards, they are creating a situation where individuals will be repeat offenders. A different approach might yield better results.

  101. Land Snark says: Oct 5, 2011 5:09 PM

    I give props to Rodgers for speaking out for his former teammate.

    I won’t ever agree with him though. The league gave him an overabundance of chances that he took and then messed up.

    Overcoming addiction isn’t easy, but it shouldn’t be upon the league or the team to provide unlimited chances to clean up.

    Having said that, I wonder how many of the people posting here have wrestled with addiction and have come out on the other side a winner. Probably few.

  102. hauts81 says: Oct 5, 2011 5:11 PM

    yeah, blame the NFL because Jolly can’t help himself and keeps trafficking butt loads of codeine. that makes total sense.

  103. kennyrogerschicken says: Oct 5, 2011 5:32 PM

    Amazing amount of comments on a story involving Rodgers. Nothing like piling on a guy for backing a teammate, especially with all of the drunk drivers, dog killers, murderers, wife beaters and drug addicts still employed in the league. Hilarious.

  104. scytherius says: Oct 5, 2011 5:53 PM

    @pappysarcasm

    *yawn*

    Hey, could you post a little something for us about what it’s like to be irrelevant to, well, anything?

  105. contra74 says: Oct 5, 2011 5:58 PM

    Carl Gerbschmidt says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:56 PM
    Rodgers is standing behind his teammate. As any good leader should do. I think you vike fans might be too used to Mcnabb already, so you don’t recognize good leadership when you see it.
    —–
    Funny how youre the first to try to spin this around and make it a Vikings thing. Youre such a loser.

  106. paulharghis says: Oct 5, 2011 6:29 PM

    herlies says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:39 PM
    Once suspended, you are not allowed back into team facilities. Basically you are banned until reinstated, right?

    For players with obvious drug and alcohol issues, being in a strong locker room culture every day probably has more positive effect on that player than simply telling him to take a hike and figure it out on his own. Especially when teammates and the organization are willing to help.

    The Packers probably wanted Jolly in house everyday but the league does not allow it. It’s not the league’s fault, as Jolly made his own decisions.

    ==================================
    What in the world would anyone in that locker room know about a support system for an addict?

    The support system he needs is a treatment facility and narcotics anonomyous. There, he would be around people schooled in helping addicts, being that many that work at these facilities are recovering themselves.

    Being around the team- he is surrounded with people that are addicts or abusing many different drugs and alcohol(potentially- relax packer fans- i’m generalizing the whole NFL not just the Packers-reference the turd watch if you don’t think there is a widespread problem).

    Anyway, I’m sure he was affored the chance of treatment- his response was to continue his idiotic behavior.
    Rodgers should have probably kept his mouth shut- he has no background in addiction – he most likely has no idea what the leaugue did or didn’t do for him. I understand he feels for his freind, but his freind is an idiot.

  107. paulharghis says: Oct 5, 2011 6:38 PM

    dukemarc says:
    Oct 5, 2011 4:34 PM
    ravenfan820 says: Oct 5, 2011 4:13 PM

    Here is what I know to be true….If I fail one drug test for the corporation I worked for I am fired, period. No second chances, no suspensions, etc…. I am gone….that is how it is in the real world…..football players should be no different…..
    ————————————————

    Does your job contribute significantly to generating hundred of millions of dollars for your employer each year? No? Do you see the difference? Your job is not equal to an NFL players, so stop using that line of reasoning.
    ================================
    It’s exactly this type of thinking that tells guys like Jolly that there is no reason to stop what they are doing. Once a person shows athletic talent in their early years- stupid behavior is tolerated or swept under the rug. That is, until it can’r be covered up anymore.
    That he is a 1/2000th cog in a corporation that generates billions of dollars is irrelevant.
    By you saying what you said, you are excusing his behavior-that;s sickening.

  108. axespray says: Oct 5, 2011 6:40 PM

    Anyone that knows anyone that has had drug addiction problems knows that the worse thing is when the Person becomes bored or doesn’t have a hobby.

    Jolly never had this whole Purple Drink problem during the season, football distracted him from using drugs. Dude was busted during the off-season and then suspended a whole season, kinda leaves him with a ton of time with no distractions…

    but can’t really blame the NFL office that much.

  109. axespray says: Oct 5, 2011 6:53 PM

    paulharghis says:Oct 5, 2011 6:29 PM
    “Being around the team- he is surrounded with people that are addicts or abusing many different drugs and alcohol…”

    Got evidence?
    Or are we just gonna roll with accusing people without evidence now like it’s the salem witch trials?

  110. Derty Ernie says: Oct 5, 2011 7:04 PM

    If Jolly would have gotten in drug trouble once, shame on the league for not assisting his recovery.
    If Jolly got in trouble twice, shame on him for jeapardizing his family and career.
    Apparently this is the fourth time assuming he did something during stage 3 suspension.
    Sadly, drugs have won out over football.
    I wish him well. He will need a lot of help.

  111. fmwarner says: Oct 5, 2011 7:17 PM

    nflofficeadmin says: Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM

    On another note… Great example of leadership here by Rodgers. This is sort of the opposite of what Eli would do for a teammate that finds himself in trouble. Plaxico is still waiting for a letter…
    =================================

    Eli was being a leader for the other 51 guys that didn’t make a dumb decision and shoot themselves in the leg but still had to suffer the consequences of losing a Pro Bowl talent on their team. Nothing happened to Plaxico, he DID something. He can keep waiting.

  112. paulharghis says: Oct 5, 2011 7:17 PM

    axespray says:
    Oct 5, 2011 6:53 PM
    paulharghis says:Oct 5, 2011 6:29 PM
    “Being around the team- he is surrounded with people that are addicts or abusing many different drugs and alcohol…”

    Got evidence?
    Or are we just gonna roll with accusing people without evidence now like it’s the salem witch trials?

    ================================
    Dude, yoiu are so F’n dumb. I wrote it out for tools like you . But nope, you have to take it as an affront to the Packers that I said there were other addicts on EVERY team.
    REading comprehension is a great thing, look into it.’
    Your post reads like you don’t think anyone else have a problem.

    Get your head out of the sand dummy.

    If he needs help- a tra
    eatment facility and narcanon are the place for him- not with his team.
    Do you get it yet?

  113. wicky888 says: Oct 5, 2011 7:33 PM

    I’ve been drug tested at every job I’ve ever. I failed one because I was on drugs, and I was fired. Pretty sure that was 100% my fault. These NFL players are such coddled babies, it’s pathetic. Take responsibility for your actions you douche.

  114. irishgary says: Oct 5, 2011 7:39 PM

    @contra74

    As you are a fan of the Vikings you can be accepted as an expert on losers.

  115. scomibord says: Oct 5, 2011 7:43 PM

    In life, you can only make a mistake once. When a person repeatedly commits the same infraction…it is called a choice. Your problems fall on you JJ!

  116. Gordon says: Oct 5, 2011 7:46 PM

    Stick to throwing a football

  117. philtration says: Oct 5, 2011 8:09 PM

    Rodgers is a great QB but the more he talks the more you can see a turd just under the surface.
    At this rate he will be just as much of a jag off as Favre is before he retires.

    Not to mention him stiff arming an old lady with cancer.

  118. joetoronto says: Oct 5, 2011 8:24 PM

    Gay men are much softer and more understanding of turds like Jolly.

    You can’t blame Erin, it’s just the way she’s wired.

  119. cactusranger71 says: Oct 5, 2011 11:54 PM

    2 white cups and I got that drank/
    Could be purple it could be pank

  120. korikill says: Oct 6, 2011 12:32 AM

    There is no place of employment that will let you come back to work to ‘be with your support group’ (or wtf-ever) once you have been suspended.

    Not until that suspension is lifted can you return to the workplace.

    That is how life is lived in the REAL world, not Enabler-Land where Rodgers comes from.

  121. nflofficeadmin says: Oct 6, 2011 7:40 AM

    fmwarner says:
    Oct 5, 2011 7:17 PM
    nflofficeadmin says: Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM

    On another note… Great example of leadership here by Rodgers. This is sort of the opposite of what Eli would do for a teammate that finds himself in trouble. Plaxico is still waiting for a letter…
    =================================

    Eli was being a leader for the other 51 guys that didn’t make a dumb decision and shoot themselves in the leg but still had to suffer the consequences of losing a Pro Bowl talent on their team. Nothing happened to Plaxico, he DID something. He can keep waiting.
    =============================
    You’re obviously to stupid to understand the point. Every dumb@ss here understands there are consequences for your actions. We’re not handing you a noble prize for that. The point is, it goes farther in a locker room when you support a teammate rather than not support a teammate. But you probably can’t understand that being the apologist that you are.

  122. nflofficeadmin says: Oct 6, 2011 7:47 AM

    bombayjon says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:51 PM
    nflofficeadmin says:
    Oct 5, 2011 3:41 PM
    Some real uninformed opinions here that appear to not really understand some fundamental things about addiction and substance abuse. What a shame…

    ——————————————

    Really? Most of them sounded pretty informed to me. “Personal responsibilty” and “admitting you have a problem” were the common themes. Is that not fundamental in addiction and substance abuse treatment?
    =======================
    Dear Bombayblowjob, nice try taking a few catch phrases on addicition and selling the idea that most of the comments on here had any depth to them as they apply to the article… The fact is they don’t, but there are a bunch of folks on here that get it… so put the generic phases down and add something original. douche.

  123. judsonjr says: Oct 6, 2011 12:58 PM

    Really if *anyone* had wanted to help Jolly (Packers, league, whoever) they should have got him out of Houston which is basically the mecca of codeine abuse. He doesn’t need to be with a team, he just needed to not be there.

    The Wisconsin equivalent would be like having alcoholic or convicted drunk driver live in an apartment above a bar.

    Jolly does have a drug problem, but I don’t think he some trafficking kingpin like some articles have made him out to be. I believe Texas law is such that if you put any codeine in a drink, the whole drink is counted toward the amount of your possession.

    It would be nice to know exactly what happened, but I would think if Jolly had been wronged by the league we would have heard about ti from him or his agent by now.

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