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Johnny Jolly gets six years in prison

Johnny Jolly AP

Suspended Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly, who has been arrested four times on drug charges, has been sentenced to six years in prison.

The Associated Press reports that Jolly tearfully asked Judge Denise Bradley for another chance, but Bradley decided he’s had enough chances.

This sentence is the result of a probation violation for getting arrested with codeine and tampering with evidence in October. His probation stemmed from a plea deal he got in April over a previous arrest for codeine possession.

According to a Houston TV report, Jolly could be eligible for parole in January of 2013.

Jolly started all 16 games for the Packers in both 2008 and 2009 and was looking like one of the most promising young defensive tackles in football, but his addiction to codeine has torn his career — and his life — apart. And this sentence could mean he’s done playing football for good.

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104 Responses to “Johnny Jolly gets six years in prison”
  1. bigjdve says: Nov 17, 2011 2:55 PM

    Let me guess, this is the NFL’s fault as well.

  2. bozosforall says: Nov 17, 2011 2:58 PM

    Looks like he will be playing with the “Packers” for the next six years.

  3. dukemarc says: Nov 17, 2011 2:59 PM

    Maybe Johnny can get the help he needs in prison.

  4. mvp43 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:01 PM

    This is probably the best thing for him. Prison will remove any opportunity that he’d have to screw uip again. I don’t condone anything he’s done, but for some people prison is a life saver.

  5. childressrulz says: Nov 17, 2011 3:01 PM

    As a Packer fan I am glad this team had the stones to cut him. Most teams would not have cut him until he got sentenced to 6 years.

  6. bjorntorock says: Nov 17, 2011 3:02 PM

    yea, i have a problem with the NFL banning the guy from team facilitys for a year and giving him no support with his addicition. SO yea I do think its the NFL’s fault.

  7. catman72 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:02 PM

    Feel bad for this guy, codeine is powerful stuff and it can turn anybody into a junkie.

  8. grudenthediva says: Nov 17, 2011 3:04 PM

    Meanwhile Leonard Little is off polishing his rims somewhere.

  9. KIR says: Nov 17, 2011 3:05 PM

    That seems harsh for a basic drug user and addict who has not robbed, stolen or caused any harm to anyone except himself. How about 6 months and a treatment program with a cause to redeem himself and his career. The laws are so different depending on the state and the drug/addiction. We’ve seen repeated drunk drivers pill addicted individuals who have cause accidents and injuries get less time. Hope the judge believes this is the best way to make him a future long term productive citizen and not just punishment.

  10. packers291 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:05 PM

    Unless he was dealing, this sentence is very excessive. Think about how much time MV got for the dogs.

    The guy is screwing his own life up, so we throw him in jail (paid for by taxpayers) so that his life can remain derailed. Someone please explain to me how hard time is what is best for him? Someone explain how it is what’s best for ALL those people he has wronged with codeine use?

  11. ironhawk says: Nov 17, 2011 3:09 PM

    Our justice system is too focused on punishment. It’s basically just a revenge system. You hurt someone, or something, so now we are going to hurt you. We also have the highest rate of repeat offenders in the first world, and the first world’s most crowded prison system.

    Norway for example, focuses on rehabilitation rather than punishment and has one of the world’s lowest rates of repeat offenders.

    I realize Norway also doesn’t have the bloods and the crips waging gun battles on the street, but maybe we need to rethink how our judicial system works.

    Jolly isn’t going to get any help in prison. All it’s going to do is make him broke and depressed and more likely than ever to use drugs.

  12. ambitoos says: Nov 17, 2011 3:10 PM

    He needs help, not prison. Prison will only make his life worse. Put him working in the morg like Lindsey Lohan. He needs rehab.

  13. NoWearMan says: Nov 17, 2011 3:11 PM

    The NFL forced this loser to tamper with evidence as well, right?

    Obviously, it’s everyone’s fault EXCEPT the person who committed the crimes.

    The NFL doesn’t allow me access to team facilities but I don’t have a codeine addiction.

    We all are responsible for our own actions. Blaming the Packers or the NFL for your troubles is…well….assinine.

  14. daysend564 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:12 PM

    @bjorntorock

    Shouldn’t you be at an “Occupy” event?

  15. pacificamjr says: Nov 17, 2011 3:13 PM

    the Judge should have cut him a break, he’s a good football player

  16. brewcrewfan54 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    Childress, Jolly hasn’t been cut by the Packers.

  17. skinsrock says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    Nice work judge… Just put another addict in prison… That’ll fix him. You are dumb.

  18. uwsptke says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    childressrulz says:
    Nov 17, 2011 3:01 PM
    As a Packer fan I am glad this team had the stones to cut him. Most teams would not have cut him until he got sentenced to 6 years.

    ============================

    I’m a Packers fan as well, but I think your facts are wrong. I think the team still has retained his rights since he signed his RFA tender before being suspended. I don’t think he was ever released by the team.

  19. ken0west says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    Got to fill those private for profit prisons with someone. If no real criminals are available why not round up the junkies?

  20. judsonjr says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    6 years for possession of cough syrup? Gotta feed the prison industry I guess.

  21. blackdonnelly says: Nov 17, 2011 3:15 PM

    Well, the judge has rendered sentence, and that is that.

    I can understand the “powers” of addiction, but c’mon man, the folks that cannot place their 6 or 7
    figure salaries over ‘purple drank” is puzzling indeed.

    Now look at him – what chance does he have to redeem himself once he’s out of the clink? As a Div IIIA assistant coach?

    This is messed up. I feel bad for Jolly, but cannot sympathize with him.

  22. chocolatebaconbutter says: Nov 17, 2011 3:15 PM

    Purple Drank. Serious business.

  23. buckhuckster says: Nov 17, 2011 3:16 PM

    Johnny ain’t so Jolly now is he? (That was the best I could come up with)

  24. daysend564 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:17 PM

    @ironhawk

    How many strikes does a guy need/get before he’s out? If he wanted help, he could have gotten help. Granted, the NFL washed their hands of him – as would any other job in the nation if a person is consistently getting arrested for drug possession. The difference is that he had millions of dollars that he could have used to check into a drug abuse facility. Jolly did not want to change, maybe this will force something in his life.

  25. rpiotr01 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:17 PM

    For those complaining about the length of punishment, please keep in mind that Jolly was found to be in possession of such quantities of codeine that intent to distribute was almost guaranteed. No one busted his door down and arrested him for drinking it in front of the TV. He was caught driving around Houston in possession of large quantities of the stuff. Multiple times. What more can a judge do?

    I don’t dispute that he has a problem and needs help, but Johnny Jolly was a drug dealer. Make no mistake about that either.

  26. jcusa514 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:18 PM

    ironhawk says: Nov 17, 2011 3:09 PM

    Our justice system is too focused on punishment. It’s basically just a revenge system. You hurt someone, or something, so now we are going to hurt you. We also have the highest rate of repeat offenders in the first world, and the first world’s most crowded prison system.

    Norway for example, focuses on rehabilitation rather than punishment and has one of the world’s lowest rates of repeat offenders.

    I realize Norway also doesn’t have the bloods and the crips waging gun battles on the street, but maybe we need to rethink how our judicial system works.

    Jolly isn’t going to get any help in prison. All it’s going to do is make him broke and depressed and more likely than ever to use drugs.
    —————————————————-
    i knew some clown on here would make some comment on how “over in europe” its so much better. in norway, its sooooo much better.

    repeat offenders like this are born that way. they are innately impulsive. prison nor rehab would work for this goof.

  27. bigjdve says: Nov 17, 2011 3:19 PM

    This wasn’t a first offense. He was on probation already for drugs, then he got busted with them again.

    With regards to the NFL, the year suspension wasn’t a first time offense either, that is a 3rd time offense. He had a support system for the other 2 times and chose not to use it.

    I don’t blame them for kicking him out of the facilities after that. I mean really he does the same thing 2 more times after you first warned him, at that point he isn’t going to get better with that system, however he might cause problems to the rest of the locker room.

    In regards to prison sentencing, if the judges cut you a break and you don’t use it wisely, of course they are going to hammer you. That is to try and get you to learn something because obviously you didn’t before.

    At the end of the day, beating addiction is hard no matter to what you are addicted, however the person is the one responsible to fix it. They have to want to fix it themselves. That is when a support system will work. Maybe, hopefully this will help him get on the right path by realizing he doesn’t want to stay in prison any longer.

  28. daysend564 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:19 PM

    @judsonjr

    Cough syrup…right..just like being in possession of coca leaves

  29. jacunn2000 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:20 PM

    “Codeine is a helluva drug” But seriously, addiction is a disease. It can take over a person. The NFL really needs a substance abuse program. As much as these guy’s get hurt and pushed to play through pain, it is a wonder this is not an epidemic among all players in the league.

  30. marvsleezy says: Nov 17, 2011 3:25 PM

    I dont really know anything about codeine, does anyone know why its illegal?

    Is it bad or something?

  31. faulkana says: Nov 17, 2011 3:25 PM

    Not so Jolly anymore.

  32. bjorntorock says: Nov 17, 2011 3:27 PM

    nowhereman, try growing up with 2 parents who are crack heads and i would love to see how you turn out. He did more in his short career then you probaly ever will.

  33. minnesconsin says: Nov 17, 2011 3:27 PM

    you can argue all you want, but jolly is the victim of a completely broken system. 6 years for drug abuse? prison should be for dangerous people who hurt people, not for people with legitimate diseases who need psychological and medical help.

    i don’t know how the people who pull the strings for the “justice” system and prison industry sleep at night.

  34. metalhead65 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:29 PM

    just how many chances do you bleeding hearts want to give somebody before they have to pay for their crime? this was his FOURTH arrest! working with the team did not seem to help him before he was banned so it is all HIS fault and no one else. you think the average guy gets 3 chances and multiple rehabs before they are sent away? again nobody made him take the drugs to get hooked he CHOSE to do it and not just once but multiple times and now he has to pay for that choice.

  35. contra74 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:29 PM

    Why are most people blaming everyone else BUT Jolly? Why cant the blame fall on the one who actually did it to himself? This is ridiculous. I understand people get addicted and I praise and respect those who took steps to beat it and eventually overcome it. But come on, what are we at, 4 times getting busted without taking steps to fix himself? Thats just ridiculous. I also find it interesting that if this was a player of any other team (Vikings for example), the Packer fans would be out in full hateful force. Instead, we have them here defending the guy.

  36. hgrubsttipkcuf says: Nov 17, 2011 3:33 PM

    once these guys start f*ckin with that drank it’s all down hill from there

  37. Steeler's Will says: Nov 17, 2011 3:37 PM

    Since it was a probation violation, he was given a stiffer sentence. Still, it’s a bad move sending a drug addict to prison.

  38. tubad4ya says: Nov 17, 2011 3:37 PM

    All he had to do was stay out of trouble *after* being initially arrested and charged. He couldn’t do that, so now it’s time to face the music. The rare opportunity to make a such good living in the NFL is fleeting, and that realization hasn’t yet arrived. Perhaps he’ll figure that out sometime between now and Jan 2013 – assuming of course he can stay out of trouble (in prison) during that time.

  39. jhumbe says: Nov 17, 2011 3:37 PM

    how many ‘second chances’ does one get? any regular Joe wouldn’t haven’t had near this many… maybe some cold steel and concrete will help him to think a bit longer when making such decisions and he’ll have a better life because of it.

  40. jimmysee says: Nov 17, 2011 3:39 PM

    Tragic.

    Sad.

    Great talent and promise.
    :-(

  41. beedubyatoo says: Nov 17, 2011 3:41 PM

    Unless he was dealing, this sentence is very excessive. Think about how much time MV got for the dogs.

    ——————————

    I’m not a Vick fan nor am I defending him, but according to the story, Jolly may get out in January 2013, less than 14 months from now. I believe Vick served 22 months and it was his first offense. Jolly had other convictions and many chances.

  42. xxwhodatxx says: Nov 17, 2011 3:43 PM

    Wait football career over? I thought when a player goes to prison and get out everyone loves them especially the media. Then they come back to great fanfare and go on to lead their team to six SBs in a row. Isn’t that what happens? LMAO. !

  43. chc4 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:45 PM

    Yodeling is popular in Norway so let’s not use them as an example.

  44. dexterismyhero says: Nov 17, 2011 3:46 PM

    Occupy……Prison

  45. judsonjr says: Nov 17, 2011 4:02 PM

    Yeah intent to distribute, lol.

    As far as I know when you mix codeine with soda in Texas, the whole drink counts toward how much possession since the drink is an “accelerant”. I say this because everything I read about one of the cases seemed to read as if he had a single cup of drank, but the possession level was such that he would have had a trunk full of cough syrup bottles to have the amount of codeine he was being charged with.

    It’s the equivalent of stealing $20, depositing it into a bank account with $5K in it, and then being charged with stealing $5K.

  46. dexterismyhero says: Nov 17, 2011 4:02 PM

    I guess this doesn’t constitute a “Turd Watch” update does it?

  47. warvette says: Nov 17, 2011 4:10 PM

    the moral?: dont get busted in texas for anything. holycow, how do you justify a six year sentence for victimless crimes?

  48. EJ says: Nov 17, 2011 4:10 PM

    Maybe he will actually get some help while he is in prison, you know, since the NFL couldn’t help him in any way.

    Why doesn’t the BIG MONEY NFL have a program that helps its players through the challenges of life? Like domestic violence, drug & alcohol abuse ect. And if they do have such a program, they do very little to inform its players and coaches.

  49. avianflew says: Nov 17, 2011 4:10 PM

    Six years for codeine violation? And who, exactly, is his codeine addiction hurting?

  50. amanitoomerisgod says: Nov 17, 2011 4:12 PM

    I am unaware of all the facts in this case.

    That said, no one should ever go to jail for using drugs.

  51. wferg1121 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:14 PM

    I think this is the best thing for him, he is only 28 and there is no doubt he will be getting clean in prison. I read that he will be elgible for parole in 14 months.. Hope he gets his life turned around.

  52. mute617 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:16 PM

    I don’t agree with this at all. His support system was taken away and he got worse. Surprise, surprise. He’s finally admitted he had a problem, that’s the start of fixing it, and he’s sent to jail. I honestly think had he been given that one last shot now that he admits he had a problem, he would have been good. Shoot, ever been to Green Bay? There isn’t all that much to do. Keep him there and he’s gonna stay out of trouble. Too bad. Another young life thrown away.

  53. dcviking says: Nov 17, 2011 4:20 PM

    @contra74 -

    Remember that most of the Packer fans here believe that the way to reduce drunk driving accidents is to spend more time practicing driving drunk…

  54. bigjdve says: Nov 17, 2011 4:22 PM

    Why should the NFL have the substance abuse program? Shouldn’t it be the NFLPA, you know the group that is supposed to be looking out for them?

  55. contra74 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:25 PM

    avianflew says:
    Nov 17, 2011 4:10 PM
    Six years for codeine violation? And who, exactly, is his codeine addiction hurting?
    ———
    6 years wasnt for codeine addiction. 6 years was for repeated probation violation. The codeine thing was a slap on the wrist however repeated probation violation, thats another story.

  56. stellarperformance says: Nov 17, 2011 4:26 PM

    Maybe he can get a part in “The Longest Yard III.”

  57. rcali says: Nov 17, 2011 4:27 PM

    Another chance? Classic.

  58. dcviking says: Nov 17, 2011 4:28 PM

    @EJ -

    The NFL does have a substance abuse program and it does work (in some cases) — see jared allen (knock on wood).

    But it is also requires some level of accountability from the individual — you can’t change the person until the person wants to change.

    Not sure if they have a domestic violence program, but I’m aware of at least one Viking who could use one…

    I can’t believe how many people actually believe Jolly is the victim here — if you don’t like the laws or the way the system works, and think places like Norway are better option, there are planes leaving everyday…

  59. themitchfootball.com says: Nov 17, 2011 4:32 PM

    It’s what makes Johnny jolly.

  60. glac1 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:33 PM

    Another sad ending for someone who had a very promising career.

  61. enders9 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:33 PM

    I have no sympathy for him. If he wasn’t already a millionaire, then he was well on his way to making millions and he just pissed it all away. I hope that codeine was worth. Better hold on to that soap, or you’re gonna be tearful for other reasons.

  62. travisblink619 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:37 PM

    Do you suppose we’ll see “The Longest Yard” played out in real life. Johnny Jolly to enact the reenactment of Burt Reynolds/Adam Sandler.

  63. packman15 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:42 PM

    We should all hope that the man gets the help he is so desperately seeking. As noted, he can be out in 14 months or so on good behavior.

    He is not from a Leave It To Beaver background so he will need assistance from a solid support group as he transitions to the real world. I think a professional football career is one of the last things he should be concerned about. A very good talent gone to waste. This is when the NFL really needs to step up.

  64. lionsfanatic84 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:49 PM

    Reich goodell dropped the ball on this one, I understand he broke the law and NFL substance policy, but instead of trying to help him by setting up counseling (correct me if I’m wrong but isn’t there an NFL substance abuse program) he flexed his muscles and threw him out like the trash.

  65. silverdeer says: Nov 17, 2011 4:53 PM

    @dcviking, I totally agree with you. I too am shocked by all of the bleeding hearts making comments out here. The dude has been arrested 4 times for drugs and with enough quantity to definitely know that he was dealing the crap. It would be my guess that these people would also be the first ones lining up to forgive him when someone gives this crap to a kid and they die from an OD or are driving and hit and kill someone. In addition, I do not blame the NFL. This is not their fault. They have given him plenty of opportunities to correct his issues. Besides, how many of your employers would give you that many chances to keep your job after you have been jailed for committing crimes. I know that mine would have booted me after the first arrest.

  66. sf69ers says: Nov 17, 2011 4:55 PM

    Shame to live in a land where justice is a game

  67. thejuddstir says: Nov 17, 2011 4:56 PM

    The posts supporting Johnny ho.ho ho Jolly are obviously from Packer fans as we all know anyone who wears or has wore the “green n gold” can do no wrong. Ya gotta be drunk or stoned to think that way but ….have u ever been to wisconsin, lol

  68. thefiesty1 says: Nov 17, 2011 4:57 PM

    This started in Collage Station. He doesn’t want help with his problem. AGGIES don’t have problems.

  69. phillysuxbigd says: Nov 17, 2011 5:01 PM

    this is not an NFL problem. this is a cultural problem. how many white football players are getting busted these days for large amounts of codeine and drinking “purple sizzurp”??? only ghetto hoods are because of tbe tough gangster image that they try to portray because of these stupid rappers singing about it. what they fail to realize is that rappers dont sign league contracts that prohibit the use of drugs, there are no personal conduct policy for rappers!!!!! those clowns can get arrested multiple times and still come outta jail and pursue a music career. maybe the real problem is the fact that the league and most teams look past character issues because winning is the only thing that matters. unfortunately it usually comes back to bite those teams in the @$$!!!! see pacman jones and the teams hes played for.

  70. purplehayseuss says: Nov 17, 2011 5:04 PM

    marvsleezy says: Nov 17, 2011 3:25 PM

    I dont really know anything about codeine, does anyone know why its illegal?

    Is it bad or something?
    ***
    Codeine is illegal and a controlled substance because of it’s addiction potential. Codeine alters perception and slows reflexes. Jolly proved that for all to see. Even in very minor prescription drugs like cough syrup and low-level pain medication by adding it to tylenol and aspirin, it has to be tracked. “Bad” is a relative term here. Those that use it legally and therapeutically find it ‘good’. Even single tablets have significant street value.

    Childressrulz: You are an idiot.

    dcvike: Thanks for pointing out the clear and obvious fact about Packers Fans. If Jolly had EVER set foot inside a Minnesota Vikings facility, even as a prospect or visitor, Bob Nelson would have record of it, including Jolly’s gas mileage and lunch receipts and hotel bills; the usual dorks wearing cheese and bowling shirts would have been very busy all day bashing. Then congratulating each other on how great they are.

  71. bunjy96 says: Nov 17, 2011 5:07 PM

    packers291 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:05 PM

    Unless he was dealing, this sentence is very excessive. Think about how much time MV got for the dogs.

    ***

    MV received no sentence for the dogs.

    His sentence was for interstate gambling.

    The dogs charge was never pursued.

  72. bigjdve says: Nov 17, 2011 5:07 PM

    He tossed him out because he was a repeat offender. He was given 2 chance prior to this one and was tossed. Oh wait, he was given 2 chances prior to his 3rd chance. The one he just got sentenced for was 5th or 6th.

    At some point people need to take responsibility for themselves instead of blaming everyone else.

  73. williebeaman says: Nov 17, 2011 5:12 PM

    Prison time for a drug charge? Well, that’s the American way.

    Not defending this guy at all, but our gvt. spends way, way, way, way too much money on drug enforcement and it really is a waste.

    Wait, what am I talking about, our government is the most well-oiled efficent machine in the world… They don’t waste anything…

  74. joetoronto says: Nov 17, 2011 5:28 PM

    bigjdve says: Nov 17, 2011 5:07 PM

    He tossed him out because he was a repeat offender. He was given 2 chance prior to this one and was tossed. Oh wait, he was given 2 chances prior to his 3rd chance. The one he just got sentenced for was 5th or 6th.

    At some point people need to take responsibility for themselves instead of blaming everyone else.
    *************************************************
    Exactly, you can’t take away personal responsibility.

    God knows there’s allot of losers out there that would love it though.

  75. jessethegreat says: Nov 17, 2011 5:29 PM

    Ouch! I don’t have a lot of sympathy for drug users, but I feel for him. He made some poor choices and is paying dearly for them.

    Where was Tony Dungy for this kid?

    He had an addiction to cough medicine. It’s not like he’s a dog torturer / drunk driver / tax evader / rapist / child molester / politician.

    How can Jerry Sandusky have his freedom while Johnny Jolly is heading to prison?

  76. wallacejay says: Nov 17, 2011 5:30 PM

    Probably concussion-related

  77. mediasloppy says: Nov 17, 2011 5:35 PM

    And these Packer fans like to rip on Vikings players who get in trouble. Everyone knows each team has its bad actors. As far as this guys sentence goes I’d think he’ll get out on parole early. This Country is all too ready to make career criminals with a revolving door policy instead of focusing on real treatment.

  78. chaunceyb says: Nov 17, 2011 5:37 PM

    How long do the Bengals have to wait to put in a waiver claim?

  79. deconjonesbitchslap says: Nov 17, 2011 5:40 PM

    this is the correct sentence, and he could make parole. the judge essentially IS giving him another chance: he can be out in just over a year if he keeps his act together in jail. he should be happy he gets that chance.

  80. minnysoda says: Nov 17, 2011 5:40 PM

    Have a Holly Jolly Sentence
    You better protect your rear
    The Pack goes 19 and oh
    But you will not be near

    Have a Holly Jolly Sentence
    And when you walk down to your cell
    Say It’s not my fault you know
    The purple drank is hell

    Nice job Moron it’s not like the NFL doesn’t have seminars for rookies let’s you know not to hang out with your old hoodlum buddies. They will get you where you are going now.Hell even Favre was smart enough to say I have a problem and I need help

  81. 2ndaryinsanity says: Nov 17, 2011 5:44 PM

    Jolly was given multiple chances by the NFL and the justice system. Unfortunately, he squandered these “2nd chances” and continued to abuse drugs. There are consequences to repeatedly breaking the law, especially when you’re still on probation. (Unless you’re Lindsey Lohan in California.) I wish Jolly would have gone to rehab…because he damn sure won’t get any help while in a Texas prison. Is the system broken? Absolutely…but does that mean we should just let criminals continue their criminal behavior??
    As for the old “it was a victimless crime,” well that’s complete B.S. Assuming Jolly wasn’t dealing, he WAS buying from a dealer…doing his small part to keep a drug dealer in business. If Jolly’s allowed to stay out on the streets abusing drugs, there’s a chance he could kill someone as he’s driving while stoned. How would YOU feel if Jolly was given “another chance” then kills someone you love because he was behind the wheel sippin’ his syrup.

  82. packman15 says: Nov 17, 2011 5:47 PM

    Sandusky has only been tried in the court of public opinion. His day of reckoning will come.

    Johnny needs to heal himself during this time.

  83. t16rich says: Nov 17, 2011 5:47 PM

    Only fair that Michael Vick gets to pet his new pet parrot while reading these headlines. That Occupy Prison comment is geniously true.

  84. warvette says: Nov 17, 2011 6:00 PM

    wallacejay says: Nov 17, 2011 5:30 PM

    Probably concussion-related

    ——————–
    exactly. how long will it take for an enterprising legal eagle to try to tie all behavior and malady to the rigors of playing the game?

  85. KIR says: Nov 17, 2011 6:15 PM

    silverdeer says: Nov 17, 2011 4:53 PM

    @dcviking, I totally agree with you. I too am shocked by all of the bleeding hearts making comments out here. The dude has been arrested 4 times for drugs and with enough quantity to definitely know that he was dealing the crap……
    ___________________________
    He’s broke or close to it. If you listen to the full interview on Espn he says a bottle of codeine cost 6 to 8 hundred and he was drinking A BOTTLE A DAY. I doubt he was a dealer.

  86. stergersburgernips says: Nov 17, 2011 6:37 PM

    The NFL relies on hood rats playing its game, stop them playing based on prior convictions/arrests, see what happens.

  87. bossplayer213 says: Nov 17, 2011 6:39 PM

    2 white cups and it could be drank……

  88. acmepacker says: Nov 17, 2011 6:49 PM

    minnysoda says:
    Nov 17, 2011 5:40 PM
    Have a Holly Jolly Sentence
    You better protect your rear
    The Pack goes 19 and oh
    But you will not be near

    Have a Holly Jolly Sentence
    And when you walk down to your cell
    Say It’s not my fault you know
    The purple drank is hell

    Nice job Moron it’s not like the NFL doesn’t have seminars for rookies let’s you know not to hang out with your old hoodlum buddies. They will get you where you are going now.Hell even Favre was smart enough to say I have a problem and I need help
    ——
    One big difference between the two men. What finally prompted Favre to do something was his wife saying “get your act together or I’m gone.”
    Then when he want back to Mississippi he had parents, a wife, siblings and children all standing behind him and giving him support. Jolly had the streets to go back to. I’m not excusing him, but he had a big hole to crawl out of and I feel for the man. I’ve known too many addicts and getting out of the life is tough. I wish him well.

  89. steelerfan9598 says: Nov 17, 2011 7:00 PM

    You only get more than three strikes if you’re Lindsay Lohan.

  90. wegonnadoitbaby says: Nov 17, 2011 7:26 PM

    That’s a really stiff sentence. Breaking the law has consequences, but 6 years for a “user” seems way out of wack with normal sentencing. I admit, I am not to familiar with his circumstance, maybe there are other factors, but at first glance it certainly seems beyond what a rational person would think is needed. It appears the guy is addicted to a narcotic…

    This is a really sad story and all the jokes and innuendos in SOME of the previous post are stomach turning. Hopefully no one you know or god forbid a loved one becomes addicted to a drug….if they do I doubt you will be hoping they get an extensive prison sentence.

  91. neilanblomi says: Nov 17, 2011 7:28 PM

    are not

  92. eweez83 says: Nov 17, 2011 7:36 PM

    “Codeine is a helluva drug” But seriously, addiction is a disease. It can take over a person. The NFL really needs a substance abuse program. As much as these guy’s get hurt and pushed to play through pain, it is a wonder this is not an epidemic among all players in the league.

    It is widely abused in the NFL, by the players and doctors. And will continue to be that way as long as they are playing the game of football. It’s just sad to see the ones who lose everything due to their addiction. Sad….

  93. irishstout says: Nov 17, 2011 7:51 PM

    Say, how’s that “War on Drugs” working out for us so far?

  94. childressrulz says: Nov 17, 2011 7:56 PM

    brewcrewfan54 says: Nov 17, 2011 3:14 PM

    Childress, Jolly hasn’t been cut by the Packers.
    __________________________
    Hard to admit I was wrong but I was wrong. I guess I was thinking of Underwood or something. Christ Packers cut this guy already!!!!!!

  95. packerfanfordecades says: Nov 17, 2011 7:58 PM

    So sad.
    My Lord, what is happening to our society?

    Yes …. like so many others who got into trouble for drug-related reasons, he deserved the sentence, I guess. I sure hope he can get over the addiction in prison but that’s not a sure thing because the $$ rewards in the supply chain can overcome the barbed wire.

    One of these years the drugs are going to have > 5% of our population locked up. Prison construction must be a growth industry.

    We gotta find a way to poison the drug supply chain so that new prospective users have a decisive reason to stay away from it.

    It’s wrecking our nation by destroying more and more people. Legalizing it isn’t the answer. Lord, please help save us from this scourge.

  96. victorslamdunk820 says: Nov 17, 2011 8:05 PM

    He should have run someone over while drunk or killed dogs, then he would be out in a year or two and resuming his career. This judge just ruined his life by sending him to jail. He may get clean but he has no means of income once he is out as he will be too old to play again. hen he will not have the economic resources to asssit other addicts as he has while serving his suspension. Lets determine what good it is to send him to State prison for 6 yrs. He has a disease, get him some treatment and let him get on with his life. God bless him, I hope he is able to do something good when he gets out.

  97. rarson says: Nov 17, 2011 8:26 PM

    Regardless of WHY a person becomes addicted to drugs, throwing them in prison is not the way to rehabilitate them. It amazes me that we still waste money policing the streets and locking up nonviolent “criminals” instead of giving them the treatment they need.

    And oh look, it’s already cost us almost 36 billion dollars this year.

  98. qball59 says: Nov 17, 2011 8:29 PM

    @ ironhawk wrote:

    I realize Norway also doesn’t have the bloods and the crips waging gun battles on the street, but maybe we need to rethink how our judicial system works.
    ——————————–
    Norway may not have the Bloods and the Crips, per se, but they definitely have similar problems in Oslo.

    At the Olympics in Lillehammer in 1994, I was talking with a Norwegian girl when the topic of conversation turned like this:

    Norwegian: “Well, our government has granted asylum to thousands of African refugees. On top of that, we gave them free housing in government apartment buildings and food subsidies. And now, incredibly, they are selling drugs out of their apartments! And, when the police come to arrest them, they are actually SHOOTING at the police! It’s simply unbelievable!”

    Me: “Really? You mean to say you’ve got Africans living in public housing who are selling drugs and then shooting at the police when they try to arrest them? Wow. I’ve never heard of such a thing…”

  99. rarson says: Nov 17, 2011 8:30 PM

    By the way, addiction is NOT a disease. Cancer is a disease. Addiction is a lack of willpower. At no point is an addicted person unable to simply stop using. Nobody is forcing them to use drugs.

  100. nothanksimdriving123 says: Nov 18, 2011 1:47 AM

    Drug abuse is a health issue (mental, physical or both) and treating health issues through the criminal justice system (aka the War on Drugs) has always been and remains an ongoing disaster. This misguided approach solves nothing and indeed makes the problem worse while creating new problems and costing taxpayers billions of dollars. As for recreational drug enjoyment, there has never been a good reason for the government to be involved in the business of telling responsible adults what chemicals they may or may not ingest. It should offer accurate information but not threaten punishment for actions that do not threaten others (actual bad things such as driving under the influence, or giving drugs to children). Legalize, tax, regulate, assist.

  101. footballfan says: Nov 18, 2011 6:37 AM

    bjorntorock says: Nov 17, 2011 3:02 PM

    yea, i have a problem with the NFL banning the guy from team facilitys for a year and giving him no support with his addicition. SO yea I do think its the NFL’s fault.

    **************

    I am sure that since this is his 4th arrest I am sure that the NFL did try and help. No matter how hard you try if they don’t want the help they will not take it. After a while you just have to cut the cord and let them follow the path they want. Yes, This si the hardest thing for anyone to have to do in life….

  102. footballfan says: Nov 18, 2011 6:39 AM

    You can call it a disease and throw all the help and money at them if ya want…. WILL NOT WORK if they do not want to be helped. After four arrests this guy didn’t want the help.

  103. captaintriumph says: Nov 18, 2011 12:34 PM

    Maybe now Packer fans will finally shut-up about the Love Boat and Favre’s past problem with painkillers.

  104. contra74 says: Nov 18, 2011 2:13 PM

    captaintriumph says:
    Nov 18, 2011 12:34 PM
    Maybe now Packer fans will finally shut-up about the Love Boat and Favre’s past problem with painkillers.
    ——————–
    You would think so considering they have someone in prison listed as a member of their organization.

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