Tampa TV station apologizes for nudity in Bucs’ locker room

Getty Images

While Tampa TV station WTVT interviewed Buccaneers offensive lineman Donald Penn in the locker room on Sunday, the cameraman and the producer failed to notice what they were capturing in the background: Another Bucs player undressing.

The player was shown only from the waist down, so we couldn’t see his face, but we could see everything below the belt. Now WTVT is apologizing for giving the home viewers a glimpse of full-frontal Buccaneer.

Earlier in the Bucs’ post game there was an inadvertent shot and we apologize for that,” the station said in a newscast afterward, via TampaBay.com.

This isn’t the first time a nude NFL player has been shown on TV, as Visanthe Shiancoe knows all too well. Frankly, given that NFL players are interviewed in the locker room after every game, it’s surprising it doesn’t happen more often.

23 responses to “Tampa TV station apologizes for nudity in Bucs’ locker room

  1. For the life of me, I’ve never been able to figure out why reporters and cameras are allowed in locker rooms – at any time. Yes, I know that the media needs access to the players and that there are deadlines involved, and that the teams need the media to do their jobs.

    But still… can’t the teams setup a room for the media after a game, and have someone go fetch a (presumably dressed) player they might want to interview? Make it to where the teams get fined if they don’t do so, and the players get fined if they don’t come when called.

    But keep the cameras and tape recorders and people who don’t belong there out of the dressing rooms.

  2. The media should never be allowed in the locker room anyway. That space should be a sanctuary for the players after the game. Wanna talk to the players? Wait for the post game presser. It’s high time some boundries start being set for media access. Media isn’t special and they have no “right” to be in the locker room………being the absolute lowest form of life that they are.

  3. Tebowmania is taking over!! Amazing how Many parts of the country he touches. I would just like to thank the lord for giving us the opportunity to watch tebowmania unfold in front of us. We are truly blessed 😦

  4. Yeah know, I’ve gotta agree with the posters thinking that the media should not be allowed in the lockerroom after games.

    Win or lose, and considering the nature of the game, players need some time to decompress. Yes, I know they get paid millions, but as a fellow human, I would not like 12 microphones/tape recorders/TV cameras in my face asking about the fumble I made that lost us the game.

    Have a media area set up for players as they leave the lockerroom. Members of the media can coordinate with the PR department of the team for requests. Allow a 5 minute time limit, or longer depending on the player, and move on.

  5. For the life of me, I’ve never been able to figure out why reporters and cameras are allowed in locker rooms – at any time. Yes, I know that the media needs access to the players and that there are deadlines involved, and that the teams need the media to do their jobs.

    But still… can’t the teams setup a room for the media after a game, and have someone go fetch a (presumably dressed) player they might want to interview? Make it to where the teams get fined if they don’t do so, and the players get fined if they don’t come when called.

    But keep the cameras and tape recorders and people who don’t belong there out of the dressing rooms.

    I think part of the reason is to catch these guys as the emotion is still fresh. Being able to shower and get dressed may quell some of that leading to more boring interviews.

  6. The shots are taken in the locker room immediately after the game because no TV viewer is going to wait 20-30 minutes after the game for player interviews. They will change the channel.

Leave a Reply