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League “looking into” Sam Hurd case

Sam Hurd AP

Bears receiver Sam Hurd currently has serious legal issues.  He soon may have serious employment issues, too.

Apart from the question of whether the Bears will simply cut Hurd, who has made only eight catches for 109 yards in 12 games this season, the NFL likely will take action against Hurd, under the personal conduct policy.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tells PFT that the league is “looking into” the situation.

The league has applied different approaches to players facing prosecution for serious crimes.  Former Falcons quarterback Mike Vick promptly was suspended after being indicted for dogfighting in July 2007.  In contrast, the league took no action against former Broncos cornerback Perrish Cox, who was charged last year with raping a woman who had passed out in his apartment.

Some would say the league’s response depends on the profile of the player and/or the attention the allegations receive.

In Hurd’s case, the league likely will ask questions first and shoot later, especially in light of the report that Hurd’s customers included a double-digit number of NFL players.  The league could give Hurd a chance to come clean regarding his customers before making any decisions about Hurd’s status pending trial.

Regardless, any players who were buying cocaine or marijuana from Hurd need to be nervous, because there’s a pretty good chance the league will find out about it — and then do something about it.

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56 Responses to “League “looking into” Sam Hurd case”
  1. myspaceyourface says: Dec 15, 2011 10:28 PM

    I hope they look harder at this than they did “SPYGATE” I can see the broom and dustpan over in the corner.

  2. echoplex89 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:29 PM

    he kind of looks like a crack addict in this illustration.

    just sayin.

  3. 11wheatd says: Dec 15, 2011 10:33 PM

    I’d hope so..

  4. gcsuk says: Dec 15, 2011 10:33 PM

    Well, at least we can read these Sam Hurd stories knowing we won’t be reading anything about Tim Tebow.

  5. Ba'al from www.Cowboys-Forum.com says: Dec 15, 2011 10:33 PM

    Ricky Williams is in shock that he didnt get a call lol

  6. viper0290 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:33 PM

    this disgusts me as an NFL fan. he should be banned from the league… not like it would matter anyway though. No team would sign him after this. If goodell fines players for CLEAN hits than he should definitely ban hurd and depending on the nfl client list, all those players should face serious discipline as well.

  7. cbrady2k says: Dec 15, 2011 10:34 PM

    Tebow > Hurd

  8. dopesimms says: Dec 15, 2011 10:34 PM

    Roger Goodell will be handing out fines, suspensions, and destruction of careers. He’s drooling at an opportunity like this. This is like 50 helmet-to-helmet contact fines in one.

  9. gmacc85 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:34 PM

    Al Capone + Tony Montana = Sam Hurd ! Whoa !!! Who knew ???

  10. captainwisdom8888 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:35 PM

    Surely, it will not be a white christmas for Sam Hurd.

  11. cardmagnet says: Dec 15, 2011 10:37 PM

    Way to “blow” a career in the pros.

  12. oilers1974 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:38 PM

    I think the “League” is the least of Hurds worries…

  13. seanx40 says: Dec 15, 2011 10:43 PM

    Since it was brought up, is there anything new on that Perrish Cox thing?

    And could the Bears go after Hurd for repayment of 2/3 of that signing bonus? Seems to me that Hurd clearly has violated terms of his contract. Not that they would ever see a dime, but they could try.

  14. worldwidebleater says: Dec 15, 2011 10:43 PM

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country? We incarcerate a higher percentage of our populace than China. I forgot, its all about the children.

  15. TxGrown says: Dec 15, 2011 10:48 PM

    Hurd finally scores this year and gets busted…man!

  16. melikefootball says: Dec 15, 2011 10:48 PM

    No wonder more and more teams aren’t selling out,FANS are getting fed up with all the BS these so called professionals are doing. NFL football is heading in the wrong direction and these actions help reenforce this. This is what the league office should go after not all these fines for players, playing the game and getting flags.

  17. mikeheruki says: Dec 15, 2011 10:49 PM

    Maybe this will force Ms, McCaskey to finally get rid of Lovie. He has lost all control.

  18. thejuddstir says: Dec 15, 2011 10:50 PM

    With Hurd’s connections in Dallas, don’t be surprised if one Michael Irvin’s name pops up in this investigation. As for Goodell and future discipline, I think he will find every possible excuse not to punish with the exception of one or two low level players that he can make an example of. Any big name players will be excused becuz it happened “when there was no CBA” and Goodell will claim he didn’t have the authority to do anything, I can just hear it now. With this investigation leading down to Dallas, you can bet that Jerrah Jones doesn’t want it affecting HIS team and players and will be burning the phone lines up with Goodell.

  19. doe22us says: Dec 15, 2011 10:54 PM

    Ratliff is shaking in his cleats.

  20. gridassassin says: Dec 15, 2011 11:00 PM

    …and ESPN’s show Playmakers was totally fictitious.

  21. omnicron204 says: Dec 15, 2011 11:02 PM

    Uhhh does the league really need to look into this…because the police is already “looking” into this.

  22. mikehockhurtz says: Dec 15, 2011 11:06 PM

    Michael Irvin is flabbergasted

  23. 6ball says: Dec 15, 2011 11:14 PM

    .

    Strip the Patriots of a first round pick.

    .

  24. jimmysee says: Dec 15, 2011 11:15 PM

    This truly makes Johnny Jolly look like small potatoes.

    And he was suspended for over a year before heading for the slammer.

  25. easyeddie says: Dec 15, 2011 11:15 PM

    worldwidebleater says: Dec 15, 2011 10:43 PM

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country? We incarcerate a higher percentage of our populace than China. I forgot, its all about the children.
    ———————————

    Drug user? Hurd wasn’t exactly selling joints behind the high school.

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country?
    How about when illicit drug-related illness, death, and crime stops costing the nation approximately $66.9 billion. Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  26. mikehockhurtz says: Dec 15, 2011 11:17 PM

    Well any of us Cowboys fans that were hoping they could sneak into the playoffs…

    Hahahaha…some of them are more worried about getting a call from the feds than the game plan…

  27. donterrelli says: Dec 15, 2011 11:18 PM

    Basically, the League is an “old boys club” and full of crap. I hate the way the league is going and cannot respect it anymore.

  28. steelerer says: Dec 15, 2011 11:21 PM

    Doesnt make a difference what the NFL wants or does, hes going to prison for decent stretch. Anybody here think hes gonna every play again?

  29. nomoreseasontix says: Dec 15, 2011 11:22 PM

    Why does it matter if he gets suspended? By the time he get outside again he’ll be too old to play.
    He’s played his last snap regardless of what the league does.

  30. sikoix says: Dec 15, 2011 11:25 PM

    40 year suspension. Later reduced to 2 years.

  31. kd75 says: Dec 15, 2011 11:30 PM

    The NFL doesn’t need to play carrots and sticks games with Hurd.

    The names on his client list will get out just like Tiger’s mistresses and the “anonamous” sample MLB steroid positive list.

  32. glink123 says: Dec 15, 2011 11:33 PM

    Somebody please tell me how this dude managed to play for SIX FULL SEASONS, while averaging less than NINE CATCHES per year??

  33. unbiased8383 says: Dec 15, 2011 11:38 PM

    So are you saying I can’t buy my weed from Sam Hurd anymore?

  34. theravenlives2 says: Dec 15, 2011 11:54 PM

    Drug user? Hurd wasn’t exactly selling joints behind the high school.

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country?
    How about when illicit drug-related illness, death, and crime stops costing the nation approximately $66.9 billion. Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    ===============================
    Bingo! Well said! You hit that right on the head. EXCELLENT post!

  35. 2ndaryinsanity says: Dec 15, 2011 11:56 PM

    AMEN, easyeddie!! I applaud the cops anytime they take a scum-bucket drug dealer off the street. I’m just wondering how long before Hurd’s NFL client list is leaked?? I think the League’s fixing to get a HUGE black eye….

  36. redbeardxxv says: Dec 16, 2011 12:04 AM

    Everyone screaming for disciplinary actions against those on Hurd’s list should realize, the list is nothing more than his word against theirs. Unless they paid by check or credit card, or on camera, there’s likely no proof of any wrongdoing. Yeah, it’ll make them look bad if their name appears, but they most likely will face no charges/fines/etc.

  37. bearsnoah says: Dec 16, 2011 12:13 AM

    Roy williams can’t catch the football
    Marion barber can’t hold on to it, and can’t stay in bounds
    Sam Hurd is a coke dealer

    How bout them cowboys?

    CUT THESE FOOLS JERRY

  38. elmoron says: Dec 16, 2011 12:26 AM

    “Everyone screaming for disciplinary actions against those on Hurd’s list should realize, the list is nothing more than his word against theirs.”
    ———————————————————–
    And besides, list or no list, someone of Mr. Hurd’s obviously upright character, outstanding intelligence, and dynamic entrepreneurship would never roll over on anyone. No worries.

  39. richm2256 says: Dec 16, 2011 12:26 AM

    gcsuk says:
    Well, at least we can read these Sam Hurd stories knowing we won’t be reading anything about Tim Tebow.
    ——————————————————-
    Until we read moronic comments like this.

  40. rarson says: Dec 16, 2011 12:40 AM

    @easyeddie

    “How about when illicit drug-related illness, death, and crime stops costing the nation approximately $66.9 billion. Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

    I have no idea where you got that number, but I have an “easy” answer for you: stop wasting money on the war on drugs. You want drug-related crime to stop? Make drugs legal. The only reason dealers like Hurt can POSSIBLY make money selling drugs is because of the black market that criminalizing drugs creates. Drug dealers can’t sell on the street what people can buy in a store.

    That also alleviates the expense of law enforcement wasting their time and our money throwing non-violent “criminals” in jail and the resulting increase in other crimes that are ignored while cops are thrown at easy busts to grab headlines.

    I’m not sure what you’re talking about with regards to auto accidents, because alcohol is by far the most common drug associated with car accidents, and that’s legal.

    Health care and “lost productivity” will be costs incurred regardless of whether drugs are legal or not. Because as it turns out, making drugs illegal doesn’t stop people from using them (it just makes it more dangerous for them to do so). But in the case of health care, like most government services, the logical answer is to privatize it.

    But I know, reality is hard to accept and extremely unpopular.

  41. kingufr says: Dec 16, 2011 1:39 AM

    How about when illicit drug-related illness, death, and crime stops costing the nation approximately $66.9 billion. Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Great…so legalize it and tax the hell out of it.

  42. stakex says: Dec 16, 2011 2:59 AM

    worldwidebleater says: Dec 15, 2011 10:43 PM

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country? We incarcerate a higher percentage of our populace than China. I forgot, its all about the children.

    ————————————————

    This is not someone smoking a little pot from time to time. This is a guy trying to buy and sell large amounts of cocaine. We do in fact arrest far too many people for tiny amounts of pot these days… but cocaine is not pot. Its a very hard drug that should never, and likely will never, be legal in the US. So your point is invalid.

    Besides, what the hell does it matter how many people China incarcerates? Everyone has this huge hard on for what China is doing, and acts like if they are doing something… then so should we. Actually go there and spend some time outside of the major cities and you would know most of China is a third world ****hole. If thats what you long for, I feel bad for you.

  43. gamermwm says: Dec 16, 2011 3:14 AM

    Just wait until some government committee decides to step in and really dig up some dirt on this and other players that will get named

    Football could be in for some bad days ahead if that happens

  44. asublimeday says: Dec 16, 2011 3:27 AM

    Im impressed he was able to move his operation from Dallas to Chicago so quickly.

  45. evanJacoby says: Dec 16, 2011 3:37 AM

    This is a joke right?? League “looking into” this? You do realize that Sam Hurd is going to jail for far longer than the NFL could ever suspend him, and considering he wasn’t even a marginal NFL player, the odds are less than zero that he’ll ever play again…

    there is not scenario in which Sam Hurd ever plays NFL football again — why sugar coat it

  46. anhdazman says: Dec 16, 2011 4:34 AM

    redbeardxxv says:
    Dec 16, 2011 12:04 AM
    Everyone screaming for disciplinary actions against those on Hurd’s list should realize, the list is nothing more than his word against theirs. Unless they paid by check or credit card, or on camera, there’s likely no proof of any wrongdoing. Yeah, it’ll make them look bad if their name appears, but they most likely will face no charges/fines/etc.

    Those on the list will be doing a piss test into a cup Goodell is holding. Only then, if you pass, you won’t be suspended.

  47. mistrezzrachael says: Dec 16, 2011 6:14 AM

    myspaceyourface says:
    Dec 15, 2011 10:28 PM
    I hope they look harder at this than they did “SPYGATE” I can see the broom and dustpan over in the corner.

    You sir,,,are a total moron..To compare spygate to THIS..is flat out dumb.

    One was a mosquito bite, made big when reality was, they did what everyone else did.

    This..is serious stuff, and could effect several teams and many players.

    God, does PFT corner the market on dumb people responding..Go find Bozo.

  48. devinmr711 says: Dec 16, 2011 6:27 AM

    I Hurd that Tebow was his #1 customer.

  49. worldwidebleater says: Dec 16, 2011 6:37 AM

    theravenlives2 says:Dec 15, 2011 11:54 PM

    Drug user? Hurd wasn’t exactly selling joints behind the high school.

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country?
    How about when illicit drug-related illness, death, and crime stops costing the nation approximately $66.9 billion. Every man, woman, and child in America pays nearly $1,000 annually to cover the expense of unnecessary health care, extra law enforcement, auto accidents, crime, and lost productivity resulting from substance abuse, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    ===============================
    Bingo! Well said! You hit that right on the head. EXCELLENT post!

    Look. Drugs are bad. Mmmkay? But so is alcohol and so is butter. If we removed the “illegal” tag from them, many of the problems (territorial drug violence), and costs (enforcement) would disappear. Add in the tax revenue and you could get a net financial gain. It is the human condition to seek altered states. And if you think alcohol is somehow better than “drugs” (which alcohol is technically classified as), you’ve never watched someone drink themselves to death. I’m out on this. This is hardly the forum for this topic.

  50. worldwidebleater says: Dec 16, 2011 7:02 AM

    stakex says:Dec 16, 2011 2:59 AM

    worldwidebleater says: Dec 15, 2011 10:43 PM

    When are we going to get over our hard-on for drug users in this country? We incarcerate a higher percentage of our populace than China. I forgot, its all about the children.

    ————————————————

    This is not someone smoking a little pot from time to time. This is a guy trying to buy and sell large amounts of cocaine. We do in fact arrest far too many people for tiny amounts of pot these days… but cocaine is not pot. Its a very hard drug that should never, and likely will never, be legal in the US. So your point is invalid.

    Besides, what the hell does it matter how many people China incarcerates? Everyone has this huge hard on for what China is doing, and acts like if they are doing something… then so should we. Actually go there and spend some time outside of the major cities and you would know most of China is a third world ****hole. If thats what you long for, I feel bad for you.

    You should take a class in reading comprehension. The point was to use China a bad example. ie. China is a complete s_hole and we should strive for better.

  51. blockee19 says: Dec 16, 2011 8:00 AM

    , and Why does PFT keep assuming that Hurd will snitch? If he doesn’t, he’s got a lot to worry about, but if he does, he has just as much to worry about. When youre dealing with that large amount of coke, you’re dealing with ruthless people who will have you and/or your family killed for snitching. And when you’re that deep into the game, you are most likely connected to a couple murders yourself. Im sure he’s not worried about whether Goodell will be lenient with his punishment, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he doesn’t give the feds any names and takes his full time.

  52. n0hopeleft says: Dec 16, 2011 8:07 AM

    This is the perfect situation for Roger.

    This is the type of player he’s been waiting to drop a serious hammer on.

  53. howley1 says: Dec 16, 2011 8:27 AM

    Cocaine is so 80′s.

  54. weneedlinemen42 says: Dec 16, 2011 9:04 AM

    I’m sure Hurd is really worried about what the NFL might do.

    He’ll probably get around to thinking about it after he is done worrying about what the Police are going to do.

    Which he’ll get around to after dealing with his primary concern, which is going to revolve around how many of his suppliers and dealers are going to want him dead before he can turn evidence against them.

  55. bigbluefan1 says: Dec 16, 2011 9:09 AM

    Unless the players paid by check or credit card I do not see what anyone can to them.

    Last I checked you have to have proof and who is going to take the word of a drug dealer?

    This fool will go to jail then when he gets out Tony dungy will help him get back on his feet.

    What I do not understand is why nothing is ever reported on all the good that players and owners do no one ever reports that Payton and Eli help build a hospital or that other players give there money to other worthy causes

  56. rarson says: Dec 16, 2011 7:10 PM

    @stakex

    “but cocaine is not pot. Its a very hard drug that should never, and likely will never, be legal in the US. So your point is invalid.”

    Actually, your point is invalid. Cocaine should be legal for the same reasons that pot should be legal. People do cocaine regardless. Throwing them in jail instead of actually treating them is not the answer. And, like I pointed out before, if you legalize it, then you eliminate the black market for it. You also eliminate the health risks that come with buying unknown drugs off the street.

    No matter what substance you’re talking about, criminalizing users and disallowing them real treatment is not the answer, nor is banning them to create an unregulated black market. Drug use is a personal decision, and a personal responsibility.

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