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Gilbride thinks his Houston offense has been vindicated

B. Ryan K. Gilbride

In a coaching career spanning four decades, Kevin Gilbride’s most famous moment was the time Buddy Ryan punched him on the sideline, when Gilbride ran the Run & Shoot as the Oilers’ offensive coordinator, and Ryan, the Oilers’ defensive coordinator, disapproved.

Years later, Gilbride believes the offense he ran in the 90s — which was decried as a gimmick by a lot more people than just Buddy Ryan — has now been vindicated.

Gilbride was asked today about how three-receiver and four-receiver sets have become commonplace in the NFL, whereas when Gilbride was running the offense in Houston the standard NFL offense included both a fullback and a tight end on the field.

“Isn’t that amazing? When I was at Houston we were four-wides, and it was considered gimmicky,” Gilbride said. “You were stepping out of the box, and now it is the norm.”

The Giants’ current winning streak began when they defeated the Jets, coached by Buddy’s son, Rex Ryan. That game was labeled as Gilbride’s revenge. But the real vindication for Gilbride is in seeing just how commonplace the offenses he ran in Houston have become around the NFL.

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13 Responses to “Gilbride thinks his Houston offense has been vindicated”
  1. quittsburghstoolers says: Feb 2, 2012 2:13 PM

    Too bad for Oiler fans that your offense wasn’t quite
    good enough to get the team over the hump, Kev…

  2. mjbulls45 says: Feb 2, 2012 2:16 PM

    is that the same offense that blew a 38 point 2nd half lead at Buffalo in the playoffs ,

    with Buffalo’s backup QB playing in the game,

    Buddy Ryan only tried to punch you because you were throwing it in that game too much and putting the defense in awful situations.

    Just like the Cowboys squandered the Lions game with a big lead , by throwing it too much and Romo got picked off a few times, why not just run it?

    and if the Pats win, then what?

  3. Mr. Wright 212 says: Feb 2, 2012 2:31 PM

    The Oilers also choked every year in the playoffs when he was there, as well.

    And like now, when Gilbride’s teams get leads, he tries to sit on them and calls predictable drives until it’s nearly too late.

    This guy is part of two of the most dramatic and historically bad choke jobs in NFL HISTORY (1992 HOU vs. BUF, 2010 NYG vs. PHI) as a result of it.

    I don’t mind him right now, but he has given many a Giant fan AGITA over the past 5-6 years.

  4. citizenstrange says: Feb 2, 2012 2:31 PM

    You have to have a smart quarterback to run it though. Eli is smart.

  5. inallsincerity says: Feb 2, 2012 2:32 PM

    The primary reason that you see more and more four-receiver sets is because the rules have changed and the NFL decided to feature the QB.

  6. conseannery says: Feb 2, 2012 2:40 PM

    His offense may have been vindicated, but that copstache he’s been rocking since the Baby Jessica rescue will never be.

  7. fishhella says: Feb 2, 2012 2:55 PM

    @mjbulls45

    you’re blaming an OFFENSE for blowing a 32 (not 38) point LEAD?

  8. nflovercollegefb says: Feb 2, 2012 3:03 PM

    inallsincerity says:
    Feb 2, 2012 2:32 PM
    The primary reason that you see more and more four-receiver sets is because the rules have changed and the NFL decided to feature the QB.
    —————————————————-
    Incorrect statement, the passing rules were opened up in 1978 to feature the QB’s, there have only been minor tweaks since then.

    The thing is that it’s taken many coaches this long to finally use the rules to their advantage. Coaches are conservative by nature so the idea of 3-4-5 WR’s was considered extreme back in the 80’s and 90’s. Today it is commonplace, that is more due to philosophy than rule changes.

  9. spfripp says: Feb 2, 2012 6:00 PM

    nflovercollegefb says:
    Feb 2, 2012 3:03 PM

    Incorrect statement, the passing rules were opened up in 1978 to feature the QB’s, there have only been minor tweaks since then.

    The thing is that it’s taken many coaches this long to finally use the rules to their advantage. Coaches are conservative by nature so the idea of 3-4-5 WR’s was considered extreme back in the 80′s and 90′s. Today it is commonplace, that is more due to philosophy than rule change.

    ___________________________________

    You are right up to a point. Sure, they had the 5 yard rule of CBs being able to bump WRs but the rules with no hitting a defenseless WR, no hitting a QB on the head or below the knees, no helmet to helmet contact has really given the offense a huge advantage. Do you really think Ronnie Lott would be blowing up WRs and RBs like he use to do under today’s rules? When was the last time you seen a WR get alligator arms?

  10. thefirstsmilergrogan says: Feb 2, 2012 6:20 PM

    Kevin Gilbride is overstating his genius. But for Coughlin’s insistence on discipline, a productive defense, and of course Burress and Tyree, the first superbowl doesn’t happen. Personally, as an Eagles fan, I was happy when Sean Payton left NYG and haven’t been nearly afraid of Gilbride’s scheme as i was of Payton’s.

    Buddy took the swing at him due to the following scenario: Houston leads 14-0, but the offense under Cody Carlsen is struggling. Houston gets the ball back in the shadow of its own end zone, and instead of running out the clock, Gilbride calls two passes, with Carlsen getting sacked and fumbling the on the second pass attempt.

    And as to how you blame the o coordinator for blowing a 32 point lead? Well, the only way you can blow a 32 point lead is to keep passing the entire second half and allow the team the time to score the 33 points they would need. Seems pretty obvious to me…..

  11. mfpepin says: Feb 2, 2012 6:34 PM

    And all you needed to have happen was a handful of rule changes that dramatically changed the game of football.

  12. inallsincerity says: Feb 2, 2012 7:04 PM

    @ nfllovercollegefb, incorrect statement??? I don’t think so, as spfripp pointed out in his post. Furthermore, you also have to factor in the abundance of dome stadiums, as weather doesn’t alter the offensive game plan. Playing in a dome allows you to just air it out without worrying about the elements. Do you think the Ram’s Greatest Show on Turf happens outdoors? Maybe. You think Peyton would be as productive outdoors? Possibly. I’m sure some of those offensive game plans would’ve changed over the years, especially when the late fall & winter was harsh in the Mid-West…

  13. douc66 says: Feb 3, 2012 6:06 AM

    Gilbride is being somewhat disingenious here. It was Mouse Davis and, to a large extent, ideas from Sid Gillman who are the ones who developed the Run and Shoot. Gilbride merely learned their ideas.

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