Skip to content

Bounty dishonesty could bring down more than Loomis

Sean Payton AP

As Rosenthal pointed out last night, Saints G.M. Mickey Loomis faces serious consequences for lying to both his in-house and out-of-house (“out-house” just didn’t sound right) bosses regarding the presence of a bounty program within the organization.  But the league’s well-timed, late-Friday-afternoon, bad-news dump regarding the bounty system strongly implies that others lied, too.

“Our security department interviewed numerous players and other individuals,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said in the release.  “At the time, those interviewed denied that any such program existed and the player that made the allegation retracted his earlier assertions.  As a result, the allegations could not be proven.  We recently received significant and credible new information and the investigation was re-opened during the latter part of the 2011 season.”

In other words, everyone interviewed about the situation initially . . . wait for it . . . LIED about the existence of a bounty program.  All of them.  Even the person who blew the whistle . . . wait for it . . . LIED by retracting the allegations.

In a prior life (which at times like this I’m reminded I don’t miss at all), I handled plenty of internal investigations regarding various types of employee wrongdoing.  And when conducting internal investigations, it’s essential that the persons being interviewed tell the truth.  In one specific case I handled, the person who did the thing he shouldn’t have done ultimately was fired — not because of the thing he did but because he lied about it, forcing the investigation to consume far more time and resources than required, and but for dumb luck nearly allowing him to get away with it.

When U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald explained to the media his decision to prosecute former Vice Presidential chief of staff Scooter Libby, Fitzgerald compared Libby’s efforts to conceal the “outing” of CIA agent Valerie Plame (who perhaps had been working undercover with the name “Peyton Hillis“) to throw dirt in the eyes of an umpire who is trying to determine whether a runner made it safely to home plate.  That’s precisely what Loomis and every single member of the organization who lied did to the league.

So why didn’t Goodell and the NFL make a big deal about the lying committed by everyone else?  Anyone who met with NFL security and imitated Sgt. Schulz should face serious consequences for impeding, and nearly frustrating, an official league investigation.

While the league can only do so much to its players in light of the CBA, the NFL can come down hard on Loomis and everyone else who lied to the league, including (presumably) former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, Saints coach Sean Payton, former Saints defensive backs coach (and current Raiders head coach) Dennis Allen, and any other non-player who knew damn well what had been happening and . . . wait for it . . . LIED to the league about it.

And so at a time when Bountygate has given rise to plenty of questions regarding what the league will do in response to the fact that coaches and players were collecting and distributing money to those who successfully injured opponents, there’s a bigger question for the league:  What will you do to those who lied to cover it up?

While the NFL has no obligation to answer that question if/when asked by the media, this particular rabbit hole eventually could capture the curiosity of those with the power to force people to talk, including but not limited to Congress, the FBI, and various local law enforcement agencies.

Does it sound a little crazy to think a criminal investigation is in the offing?  Maybe.  But if we remove from the equation the fact that these actions occurred within the confines of a football field, it also sounds a little like The Sopranos.

Permalink 63 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: New Orleans Saints, Rumor Mill, Top Stories
63 Responses to “Bounty dishonesty could bring down more than Loomis”
  1. AlohaMrHand says: Mar 3, 2012 10:42 AM

    fire him so another team can hire him.

  2. mataug says: Mar 3, 2012 10:51 AM

    I hope the Saints get the book thrown at them. There had already been an investigation into it and it seems they still continued it. This shows absolute disregard for the rules.
    And the bounty setup shows absolute disregard for human life. What difference is left between these guys and a professional hit ?

  3. randolph32 says: Mar 3, 2012 10:51 AM

    Somewhere Bill Belicheck is laughing….

  4. marcinhouston says: Mar 3, 2012 10:51 AM

    Except it seems everyone from the Buddy Ryan coaching tree had the bounty system on defense. Williams did it in Washington. Fischer and Williams did in Tennessee. Rex Ryan and Baltimore are associated with it as Suggs talked in 2008 about bounties on Hines Ward etc and Bart Scott bragged about putting a little hot sauce on Reggie Bush (twisting his ankle purposefully). Williams has coached for the Eagles, Titans, Bills, Redskins, Jaguars, and Saints. Fischer was coach of the Titans for a decade. Rex Ryan did this with the Ravens and probably with the Jets. It would seem unlikely that Rob Ryan didn’t do it, which brings in the Raiders and Cowboys. All of this traces back to the NFL letting Buddy Ryan do it, and presumably he started with the Bears before the Eagles and continued it in Arizona, etc.

  5. steveohho says: Mar 3, 2012 10:56 AM

    This is a witch hunt. Players love betting on anything. Why wouldn’t the D-line or backers not bet on who can get rid of the opposing star qb? Prolly goes on all the time on all the teams. Perhaps its better to pool cash and award it to the defenders who can slay the YAC as opposed to the QB? This is yet more BS PR from the NFL.

  6. cwby4evr says: Mar 3, 2012 10:59 AM

    The league should also investigate Tampa Bay for taking out Sean Peyton.

  7. emmac13 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:02 AM

    It was Mangini who blow the whistle while gathering intel working at ESPN.

  8. nyyjetsknicks says: Mar 3, 2012 11:03 AM

    We’re about to see the NFL’s version on the death penatly.

  9. realitypolice says: Mar 3, 2012 11:05 AM

    Does it sound a little crazy to think a criminal investigation is in the offing? Maybe. But if we remove from the equation the fact that these actions occurred within the confines of a football field, it also sounds a little like The Sopranos.
    =====================

    Are you kidding me? Please tell me what, if any, federal or state law was broken?

    They didn’t lie to the government, they lied to the NFL.

    And as much as the lack of perspective on this site would have you believe otherwise, the NFL and the Federal Government are not actually the same thing.

  10. clayton43 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:06 AM

    Here we go.. some congressman will get involved ( probably one from Mass) with this and we will have congressional meetings as a top priority on this issue as soon as two weeks, ya know cause this is of most importance and we must get to the bottom of it !!

    The Saints got caught… they will be punished … but I am pretty sure that there are alot of teams that had something similar in place, though maybe without knowledge of head coach ect ect… so before fans of teams other than the Saints start in too much, better wait before slinging too much mud because it may come out in a few weeks that your team also had something in place as well by the players no matter how far back.

  11. saints25 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:07 AM

    trust me it’s more about the money than anything…..

  12. ayoungandres says: Mar 3, 2012 11:07 AM

    I don’t think the NFL will necessarily have the last word here. This behaviour is criminal (it’s clearly a conspiracy) and I’m sure there is a hungry prosecutor out there thinking about opening a grand jury investigation.

  13. 1liondriven says: Mar 3, 2012 11:08 AM

    The league should take 1 first round draft pick for each season that NO violated the bounty rule.
    In addition, The DC should be Suspended for 1 full year (regardless of where he works now) The GM suspended 1 full year. Head coach, suspend 1 full year.
    They are lucky that no one was killed or maimed for life.
    Regretfully, the players involved must be fined as well. They must be held accountable for their actions because, to a man, they knew it was wrong.
    Finally, the league has to do something about the officiating. The officiating has become so bad that it to is compromising the integrity of the games. If the league is going to hammer players and teams for compromising the integrity of the league they must look at themselves as well.
    Additionally, I would not be surprised if the league, at least considers taking over control of the football operations for the period of the aforementioned suspension period.

  14. propertyofthebroncos says: Mar 3, 2012 11:08 AM

    steveohho- how can you possibly say this is a witch hunt? yes I’m sure players talk about things and yes this is football so injuries happen. but one should NEVER happen because you are such a low life you will accept money to intentionally injure someone else. its disgusting and horrible and anyone who can think its okay is just as equally a low life.

  15. momsasaynt says: Mar 3, 2012 11:12 AM

    Maybe I missed it but what about the players who participated? I realize some are gone from the league but some are still in and are still Saints.

  16. stevincinci says: Mar 3, 2012 11:14 AM

    Steelers had a bounty on Palmer in the 2005 playoff game. Worked out well for them.

  17. packattack1967 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:16 AM

    Someone should be banned from the NFL for life if indisputable evidence exists. It’s almost criminal.

  18. pats1995 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:17 AM

    HOW MANY SUPERBOWLS HAVE THE SAINTS WON SINCE BOUNTYGATE? hahahahahaha

  19. turbodog1027 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:18 AM

    1liondriven says: Mar 3, 2012 11:08 AM

    The league should take 1 first round draft pick for each season that NO violated the bounty rule.
    In addition, The DC should be Suspended for 1 full year (regardless of where he works now) The GM suspended 1 full year. Head coach, suspend 1 full year.
    They are lucky that no one was killed or maimed for life.
    Regretfully, the players involved must be fined as well. They must be held accountable for their actions because, to a man, they knew it was wrong.
    Finally, the league has to do something about the officiating. The officiating has become so bad that it to is compromising the integrity of the games. If the league is going to hammer players and teams for compromising the integrity of the league they must look at themselves as well.
    Additionally, I would not be surprised if the league, at least considers taking over control of the football operations for the period of the aforementioned suspension period.

    WOWWWW…..extreme overkill here.
    Go back to bed

  20. stevenfbrackett says: Mar 3, 2012 11:19 AM

    Absolutely all the players, coaching staff and teams involved need to be heavily fined and suspensions all around for all involved.

    Others are calling for loss of franchise tags and draft picks. I can get with that. But here’s a novel idea — take a page from the college rulebook — make them post-season ineligible for 3-5 years – regardless of record. That would likely get through to them more than anything.

  21. saints97 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:23 AM

    What’s funny is that people think NFL players behave differently without a bounty system in place.

    This is all just a PR mountain out of molehill situation.

    It’s funny how all the Nancies in the media are acting like this is genocide, while players are blowing it off like it isn’t a big deal. Wonder why that is.

  22. nunpuncher says: Mar 3, 2012 11:24 AM

    Regardless, if alot of teams and players have been doing this The Saints should’nt have been so obvious about it. With The Saints being caught red handed it justifies Roger Goodell’s stance on on fining players for hits that players and fans have been rallying against. I hope The Saints organization gets slapped hard.

  23. saints97 says: Mar 3, 2012 11:27 AM

    They won’t touch the players on the this. The minute they try to come down hard on the players, the union will jump in and let everyone know that this goes on everywhere. What will the NFL do with that egg on their face?

  24. buckeye1nation says: Mar 3, 2012 11:56 AM

    How many of you screaming for max punishment for those involved in this are the same ones screaming when the NFL fines a player for a hit the league deems rough? You say that the league is becoming league of “pansies” (put in a term that would not get me booted) yet you want players, coaches, and GM’s fined, suspended or banned from the league for something that goes on with probably every team. The bounty system wasn’t the biggest mistake they broke, it was lying to the league. Like in may cases, the coverup is worse than the crime..

  25. jillbrenneman says: Mar 3, 2012 11:58 AM

    The mere fact that they are likely to just suspend Loomis and others is still a signal that the league and the franchise protects it’s own.

    What would happen to the rest of us in our jobs if we lied repeatedly in an internal investigation? We would be fired. It would likely be a career killer in that field. And it would be very hard to explain it to potential new employers. Much less new employers that happen to own a franchise in the same company…….

    Loomis and the others are still being protected by the system by virtue of just being suspended (unless they are terminated in the future). The rest of us would just get nailed to the wall and would be finishing our careers bagging groceries at Safeway.

  26. billinlouisiana says: Mar 3, 2012 12:02 PM

    The NFLPA is already being consulted on the punishments. Don’t be surprised if they ok some kind of fine or suspension for some of the players involved. There is also a report that Reggie Bush’s former agent gave money into the bounty program and if so the NFLPA should at least suspend his agent liscense

  27. pgui88 says: Mar 3, 2012 12:09 PM

    Dick Butkus has to be having a great laugh at all of this.

  28. thundersnacker says: Mar 3, 2012 12:10 PM

    The Saints aren’t in a division with a New York team. Therefore the Ny media will not be making such a big deal out of this, the commissioner will need to make a pr move. Breath easy Saints fans.

  29. realitypolice says: Mar 3, 2012 12:19 PM

    jillbrenneman says:
    Mar 3, 2012 11:58 AM
    The mere fact that they are likely to just suspend Loomis and others is still a signal that the league and the franchise protects it’s own.
    ==================

    The League does not have the power to fire employees of individual teams. They do not work for the NFL. Only the teams themselves can fire their employees.

  30. halen11 says: Mar 3, 2012 12:21 PM

    The Saints should definitely be punished from GM to player. Fines, suspensions… throw the book at them.

    I’d like to see some stats from 2009 on where the Saints ranked in terms of defensive penalties, yards penalized due to defensive penalties, average yards per defensive penalty, and total fines of defensive players before I put an asterisk on their championship ring.

  31. phillyphever says: Mar 3, 2012 12:26 PM

    Saints: take away the franchise tag for this year (no first round pick, so this is basically the next best thing the NFL can do to the Saints), suspend Payton for 6 games (4 on appeal) and suspend the players and coaches involved 3 games (Loomis gets off because Benson is gonna fire him over this soon).

    Williams: suspend him for a full year.

    Fines: Max the CBA allows for everyone involved.

  32. mike83ri says: Mar 3, 2012 12:31 PM

    ts97 says:
    Mar 3, 2012 11:27 AM

    They won’t touch the players on the this. The minute they try to come down hard on the players, the union will jump in and let everyone know that this goes on everywhere. What will the NFL do with that egg on their face?
    ——————————-
    Really? You think the union is going to take the stance of defending they payment as motivation for casuing injuries of players within that union? You think the union will support the waste of cash used to investigate multiple times after lying to cover this up, cash that would have otherwise been profit and shared with the players?

    I guess the handle ‘saints97′ explains it all. The Pats lots a 1st and $750k for video taping signals everyone can see and admitting to it and handing over all copies of tapes when confronted. They took responsibility for their mistake, and never won a Superbowl in a year they were doing it, then went on to win 18 games in a row to get to the next Superbowl after stopping. The Saints lied to league investigators, violated salary cap rules, knowingly participated in a program that led to injured players, and could potentially cause those involved to be audited by the IRS for thousands of dollars in unreported income. Ya, it’s no big deal.

  33. bigjdve says: Mar 3, 2012 12:34 PM

    New Flash people, all players are paid on a bounty system. The defenders are paid for being big, fast, strong, and hitting the hardest. The offense is paid for being fast, strong, and better at getting down field.

    This is a contact sport, for which the players are paid alot of money to hurt each other in an attempt to score. So, all of this calling for heads is really ridiculous.

    That being said a (stupid) rule was broken, so coaches and front office people need to be penalized, just like all players that have illegal hit penalties. Fair is fair.

    Then, the cover-up is the part that really needs to get some of those people nailed to the wall.

  34. rgledz says: Mar 3, 2012 12:36 PM

    @stevohho……Don’t be so damn naive man! This is more than players betting on taking somebody out, which is bad enough by itself, this about about a coaching staff and organization encouraging bounties on opposing players! They should face the full wrath of the league and people should be fired. You can throw your witch hunt in the garbage dumpster.

  35. tomcous says: Mar 3, 2012 12:36 PM

    How many people believe Benson doesn’t have Bill Polian on speed-dial already?

  36. sricko says: Mar 3, 2012 12:45 PM

    Dammit I forgot Dennis Allen worked under Williams… hope this doesn’t bite us… in Reggie We Trust

  37. ballergac says: Mar 3, 2012 12:53 PM

    Wow, being a Raider fan, I totally forgot Dennis Allen is apart of this. Maybe he was the whistle blower but wow…. Interesting developments… As far as Gregg Williams. Two year suspension and 5 year probation seems fit. Saints team has to lose a least a 1st rounder.

  38. firstandonlywarning says: Mar 3, 2012 12:53 PM

    I get that players and Coaches love to bet on things

    I get that a bounty system builds team unity

    I get that the majority use them

    But it’s against the rules, the Saints got caught, and massive covering-up and lying to league officials will and should be answered harshly.

    And reality police, nope the league sure can’t fire employees.
    But the league can ban them from the NFL so Im not sure what your point is.

  39. surly1n1nd1anapol1s says: Mar 3, 2012 12:57 PM

    I’m not a lawyer so I must ask, is the criminal charge likely assault and battery? Does the NHL offer precedent?

  40. themonster49 says: Mar 3, 2012 1:06 PM

    I slept on this last night. I have determined that this is unacceptable. This crosses the most important line.

    This is a competition, a sport. This is not martial arts. Even then, maiming someone is unacceptable, it goes against the purpose of competition.

    This is not a war between two countries, in which we accept that harming others is acceptable to protect ourselves or others. Either way the defending factor is the most important line of all.

    Sport is not a spectacle of changing the quality of life of another human being by way of intentional injury. Sport is a competition of pushing the strengths of not only yourself but your opponent. Facing head on in equal challenge to prove your sheer determination, effort and will are the deciding factor. Sport is the most respectable of competition, it is our bodies in competion. There is a reason it mentally, physically and visually captivates us.

    I hope the NFL takes this serious, and reacts more serious. To raise children that harming others for any reason imaginable is acceptable is unacceptable. Football is a great sport, it teaches our children to be strong and have equally strong values. What the NFL does is looked up to by everyone, and sets the standard for all organized football. Lets see them be strong and find a way to remind everyone it was about being strong, not weak, that made this sport. It is being strong, not weak, that will make this sport the greatest on earth.

  41. crabboil says: Mar 3, 2012 1:08 PM

    The real question is, “who is the rat?”

  42. hedleykow says: Mar 3, 2012 1:18 PM

    Greg Williams will be banned for life from employment in the NFL. Mark it down. And that might not be his biggest problem if anyone who got injured by one of his bounty hunters decides to press the case in civil and/or criminal court.

  43. southcakpanther says: Mar 3, 2012 1:22 PM

    This whole situation is so awesome. I hope they throw the book at the Saints.

  44. hawkitnow says: Mar 3, 2012 1:58 PM

    it didn’t look like there was a bounty on marshawn in that playoff game

  45. hendawg21 says: Mar 3, 2012 2:00 PM

    In this day and age where the offenses get all the advantage what else could a D-coordinator do??? If someone was knocked out of the game was it due to flagrant or uneccessary hit? I mean its not hard to determine a clean hit oppossed to a dirty one…I swear pretty soon NFL players will be relegated to flag football…they choose to play the game yet want to blame the NFL for their health conditions…certain activities come with risk this we know so man up or don’t play the game!

  46. nflfollower says: Mar 3, 2012 2:13 PM

    If Kurt warner or favre ever need cash… All they gotta do is say they still have chronic headaches and sue greg Williams, or by the “deep pockets” principle sue the saints owner or even the NFL. That would open a whole other can of worms.

  47. zatko says: Mar 3, 2012 2:14 PM

    Well let’s see…

    Favre was the target… and suggests there were bounties on him in the NFC Championship game. All agreed that something needed to be done to protect the QB’s against such an idea. NFL begins it’s investigation but prays that there is no “negative” findings. Wait… hold everything Favre… in the year with the Jets and had his Sextgate scandal… he wants to play another year… so he defends the bounties as simply agressive play and the League agrees to put off the sextgate probe and subsequent actions. Could it be or do I just watch too much “Person of Interest”?

  48. macklinr61 says: Mar 3, 2012 2:16 PM

    How many times have I seen a defensive player stand up and twist Frank Gore’s ankle after a tackle? The defense knows that if you injure Gore, the Niners are dead (not as much in 2011 but definitely 2005 – 2010). Gore is tough and fights through it. However, ligament damage is a serious career shortening deal.

    On a related but different thought: I can now see why Brees wants more cash to play for the Saints! He will get killed by bounties if the league sweeps this under the rug.

  49. dave1961 says: Mar 3, 2012 2:25 PM

    Did Jeff Fisher of St Louis and Gregg Williams employee it with the Titans too. Wow, bet it gets swept under the carpet. Too many people knew and Roger Goodell isn’t going to do anything about it but talk…. if it was James Harrison of the Steelers he’d be banned for life. The NFL will talk tough but at the end of the day nothing will happen…. unless they can pin it all on James Harrison…. and I’m a Browns fan lol!…. If they do nothing they should give every player back any fine they ever were hit by for unecessary or illegal hits…. Sounds like the league is full of Tony Sopranos everywhere. Safety for players is turning out to be the joke of Roger Goodell’s own policy and standards.

  50. bucfansouthtampa says: Mar 3, 2012 2:35 PM

    Derrin Sharper (former Saints Safety who is looking for a job) was on NFL Network’s Total Access this morning and absolutely denied any and all allegations of a bounty system. He said he never heard of it. If it is discovered that he knew about it, and is caught lying about it, he should be banned from NFL Network for life.

  51. 7ransponder says: Mar 3, 2012 2:59 PM

    saints97 says:
    Mar 3, 2012 11:23 AM
    What’s funny is that people think NFL players behave differently without a bounty system in place.

    This is all just a PR mountain out of molehill situation.

    It’s funny how all the Nancies in the media are acting like this is genocide, while players are blowing it off like it isn’t a big deal. Wonder why that is.

    ——————————–

    Hey look, another Saints fan in stage 1 of the 5 stages of grief.

    The only players that have spoken publicly are former or current Saints, and all they’ve done is deny it ever happened. which flies in the face of rational thought. The other players are being smart and not saying a word for fear of their teams being investigated for the same thing and putting them too on the chopping block.

    Bottom line here is that there is already a RULE for this sort of thing and that it shouldn’t be done. The Saints lied about breaking the rule and now they must face the consequences.

  52. melikefootball says: Mar 3, 2012 3:07 PM

    God-del and his hinchman have had no problems for fines on players they felt were in bad taste yet now they seem to want to back up on fining promoting taking out players. Certain players have been given fines many times for hits that were against league office yet a head defensive coach has promoted for year to take people out and get a bonus and God-del seems to have blinders on witht this latest memo. Come on G0d-del use some power on the darlings of the South.

  53. kpwdjw says: Mar 3, 2012 3:47 PM

    Better yet they should elect these guys coach of the year like they did belicheat when he got caught – just ask Peter King the head voter for Belicheat every time his name comes up for anything.

  54. conormacleod says: Mar 3, 2012 3:50 PM

    There is a HUGE difference between a single player or two deciding their teams best chance to win is to hurt the other teams QB, and a coach on the other team offering extra cash to the guy that accomplishes this goal. James Harrison is a dirty player. But, if his coaches paid him to spear his helmet at another player on purpose, then how would we all feel? THAT is the difference between hard nosed players from the past and the Saints that won the Superbowl.

  55. hitwithafade says: Mar 3, 2012 3:54 PM

    supposedly Mike Vick got suspended longer for telling the Commish lies….

    I can’t figure why his gambling associations meant more…it would be just like the no fun league to take GW life’s career away and reward a lying piece of trash like Vick to go on fixing games like he did last year

  56. hitwithafade says: Mar 3, 2012 3:55 PM

    didn’t mean more

  57. kmesr53 says: Mar 3, 2012 4:42 PM

    The Saints are a team in ruins. How can a man deliberately put another man’s physical health and livelihood in jeopardy for a mere fraction of what they’re paid in salary. Men of the same brotherhood. Everything they’ve accomplished in the Payton/Williams years means nothing. Those achievements are fraudulent.
    How can the coaches and administration allow these actions to take place. Even if they weren’t involved directly that had first hand knowledge and are just as guilty.
    This team’s image is tarnished forever. What ever they accomplish in future seasons will never overshadow bounty hunting.

  58. kmesr53 says: Mar 3, 2012 4:49 PM

    The value of The Saints organization has plummeted since these actions surfaced. When they hit the market they can be scooped up for a bargain. They should be sold, disbanded and forgot about. They have no legitimate future in the NFL. They’re permanently stygmatized.

  59. kmesr53 says: Mar 3, 2012 4:59 PM

    If sympathy should be shown to anyone involved in this scandal it’s Saints owner Tom Benson. For years this team has been his obsession….his pride and joy. He had no knowledge of “bounties” and his NFL career shouldn’t end this way. He deserves much more respect from the team he loves.
    It’s a shame Mr. Benson won’t be known as the man who brought a championship to the Big Easy.

  60. jillbrenneman says: Mar 3, 2012 5:30 PM

    realitypolice says:
    Mar 3, 2012 12:19 PM

    The League does not have the power to fire employees of individual teams. They do not work for the NFL. Only the teams themselves can fire their employees.
    ————————————–
    Fair enough. I stand corrected. Although ultimately my point remains the same. The system is still protecting the ole boys club in that sense. If any of us worked for a franchise and the franchise’s parent org conducted an investigation in which we lied. How likely would we be to just get a suspension? This is a major integrity issue that they tried to cover up. The rest of us would get fired. Those responsible should get fired. If it’s the Saints that have to do it, then it should be the Saints that do it. FWIW, I have no issue with the Saints. I actually like them. But this is where an organization has to take a stand. Bounties on player injuries. Come on……. Everyone involved knew that was wrong.

  61. TheWizard says: Mar 3, 2012 7:28 PM

    Funny.

    You bring Libby into it, I refute your leftist nonsense with a fact, and you delete my post.

    One way to make your point resonate, I suppose.

    Not very honest.

  62. zatko says: Mar 4, 2012 8:49 AM

    kmesr53 says:
    Mar 3, 2012 4:59 PM
    If sympathy should be shown to anyone involved in this scandal it’s Saints owner Tom Benson. For years this team has been his obsession….his pride and joy. He had no knowledge of “bounties” and his NFL career shouldn’t end this way. He deserves much more respect from the team he loves.
    It’s a shame Mr. Benson won’t be known as the man who brought a championship to the Big Easy.
    ……”………”………….”…”……………”……….”…………………

    In all fairness couldn’t the same be said about the owners, coaches, fans in Minnesota?

  63. CKL says: Mar 4, 2012 4:34 PM

    realitypolice says:
    Mar 3, 2012 12:19 PM

    The League does not have the power to fire employees of individual teams. They do not work for the NFL. Only the teams themselves can fire their employees.
    –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
    Maybe it was only during the extreme circumstances of the lockout that this applied, but I believe that the NFL did state that any team employee who violated the lockout in regards to communicating with players could be fired by them. There was something of this nature in place because I remember being outraged that the NFL would have the power to fire people they neither pay nor employ.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!