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Steve Young thinks players who were injured should sue the Saints

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Steve Young isn’t only a Hall of Fame quarterback. He’s also a lawyer. And in his legal opinion, the bounty scandal in New Orleans is outrageous, egregious, preposterous.

Young said on ESPN today that he believes a player who was injured against the Saints during the three years that defensive coordinator Gregg Williams was running a bounty program, paying players for knocking opponents out of games, would have a good case for a lawsuit.

“I was shocked at the fact that it was institutionalized and that they paid for hurt players,” Young said. “I think it opens up, if I’m hurt against the Saints in the last couple years, I’m suing the Saints.”

Young said the fact that the bounties came from the coaching staff makes the team culpable.

“It’s institutionalized by the coaches, and it’s institutionalized to pay them for actually injuring somebody,” Young said. “The problem is that they institutionalized paying somebody for actually hurting them. To me that goes to the integrity of the game. The fact that they institutionalized it tells me that this is a big issue.”

There’s no question it’s a big issue. The question is whether the ramifications of the issue will be confined to the league office, or whether this story could find its way to a courtroom.

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92 Responses to “Steve Young thinks players who were injured should sue the Saints”
  1. yardape74 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:07 PM

    Still bitter from getting planted into the ASU grass by Anenaes Williams. I always hated Young and still do.

  2. onebucplace says: Mar 5, 2012 6:08 PM

    …and Buccaneers fans should sue Young for how he tanked his play in ’85 & ’86 in order to force a trade.

  3. etoharin78 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:09 PM

    Yet another reason to despise lawyers

  4. pgui88 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:10 PM

    Did you mention that he was a lawyer? Always itching for that lawsuit huh Steve?

  5. paperlions says: Mar 5, 2012 6:10 PM

    Something I have yet to see anyone address: did the Saints defense actually injure more players than an average defense? Just because there was a bounty program, doesn’t mean it resulting in more injuries.

    So….I want to know…compared to the NFL average, how many offensive players were hurt playing against the Saints defense as a result of a big hit?

    There are a lot of laws/rules/policies that do not work as intended or expected….maybe someone should look at the data, eh?

  6. showerswithsandusky says: Mar 5, 2012 6:11 PM

    A comment from Steve Young I agree with.

  7. conormacleod says: Mar 5, 2012 6:11 PM

    Churn up the PR machine Roger, and crush the Saints!

  8. melikefootball says: Mar 5, 2012 6:12 PM

    He is right, look at the players coming out of the woodwork on hits to head. Now that the bounty issue is hot and supposidly have prove of this why not. Let Farve and Manning be the first,, Oh would love to be a mouse in the Comish’s office this week. He better come down hard.

  9. fijabbersman345 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:14 PM

    They should. For once, I agree with Steve Young.

  10. ogre2010 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:15 PM

    This is going to get ugly

  11. cappa662 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:16 PM

    Forget suing the saints, sue the NFL

  12. 49er33 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:16 PM

    Yardape74 you sound like the bitter one, throwing hatred into it. Simply Young who had a Law Degree giving his professional opinion on it, as a ESPN analyst. I’d definitely want to sue someone who got me injured if that were the case, the late hits on Brett Favre in the NFC Championship game being case and point.

  13. colt2011 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:19 PM

    Good to hear the correct legal terminology and possible implications applied by a former great QB/player aka Lawyer. INTENT to cause bodily harm is referred to as assault- a criminal offense!

  14. ronjohn16 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:19 PM

    Hey onebuc
    Young (and Trent Dilfer) should have sued the Bucs for coaching malpractice.

    Young seemed to be just fine when he was with the Niners.

  15. halen11 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:19 PM

    By that logic, James Harrison should hire a lawyer.

  16. onebucplace says: Mar 5, 2012 6:20 PM

    Maybe we can have a lawyers approved football league – wouldn’t that be fun. We’d need to remove tackling since someone might get hurt, and even flag football could lead to injuries so instead of tackling a defensive player would yell ‘gotcha’ and the offensive player would be ruled down. However the term gotcha would need to be researched to make sure there are no trademark issues so that term is still subject to change. Also the 30-minute pregame scroll explaining the terms of use of the game would probably be more exciting than the current pre-games, so that’s a plus. I think Steve Young might be on to something — more lawyers = more fun!

  17. tdk24 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:22 PM

    Steve, they are breaking a rule, not breaking a law other than maybe tax evasion. But believe me mr. QB, after all those extravagant meals you bought your OL after a game, you don’t want to go there. I don’t see any difference in a QB telling the OLine that if they play extra hard to protect him he’ll take them all out for dinner after a game, and bountygate. Players play hard, players get hurt, whether there’s a bounty or not. Now if they tie it back to the owner, then that’s a whole new ball of wax. But again, the punishment has been set for salary cap cheating by mr. Youngs old team in 94 and the Broncos not long after that, but resulting is minimal fines. So if the NFL comes down hard on the Saints, by taking picks, multiple year long suspensions, stuff like that, it would be sickening. This is pro football, not college or pee wees.

  18. reed20fence says: Mar 5, 2012 6:23 PM

    You would think athletes at this level of play would have some sense of honor and decency.

    Men devote their entire lives and sacrifice time with their families and loved ones in order to train and advance their careers in the NFL and myraid lesser leagues.

    To have such cavalier disregard for the efforts of others by deliberately hurting your opponent and making it easier for you to win a game is as cowardly and unsportsmanlike as it comes.

    Cowardly because they hide behind the inherrent agression of the game to get away with what many consider (evidently even Steve Young) a crime.

    Athletes play football. But it takes real men to win honorably.

    And they did not win honorably.

  19. brewcrewfan54 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:23 PM

    I usually like Young but he’s way off the mark on this one. Another person all about a lawsuit.

  20. bangitfootball says: Mar 5, 2012 6:24 PM

    Ambulance chasing vulture lawyers feeding on the league carcus. This is the new NFL.

  21. prrebel says: Mar 5, 2012 6:24 PM

    So every player that was injured against the Saints should sue? Does that include pulled hamstrings, sprained ankles, paper cuts from looking at pictures on sidelines, and turf toe Steve? For a lawyer, you’re not very smart. Just because there was a bounty, does not mean every tackle or hit that may have caused an injury was due to the bounty program. Need to drum up a little business Steve?

  22. razic3k says: Mar 5, 2012 6:28 PM

    Steve Young is right!!

    For those players injured, what would their careers have been? How much more would they have made?

  23. tomsd1 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:29 PM

    Steve Young went to Law School but I don’t think he ever really practiced law.

    The key question IMP – is – as one poster noted above : Did the Saints “bounty” program cause any more injuries than would have normally been sustained in a hard hitting NFL game?

    It’s called “causation” – in legal parlance. :)

  24. yogikenobi says: Mar 5, 2012 6:29 PM

    This shows how much society changes. When I was growing up the players who talked about hurting people and tearing their limbs off were legends. Now they are talking about suing other each other?!?

  25. randolph32 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:33 PM

    @Paperlions…I was reading (can’t find it now dammit) that over the last few Seasons they were the highest penalized team, not that it necessarily leads to the most injuries from playing them, just sayin…

  26. ramitbaby says: Mar 5, 2012 6:35 PM

    Shocking! A licensed attorney advocating a frivolous lawsuit. Maybe Young should sue Aeneas Williams for ending his career.

  27. bearfan34 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:36 PM

    As my name shows, I’m a Bears fan. Earl Bennett and Gabe Carimi both needed surgery after playing the Saints this past season. If I’m the insurance provider who had to pay for said surgery/rehab, you’d better believe I’m coming after the Saints to get my money back. And I have a feeling I’ll have a bunch of other team’s providers following right along with me.

  28. backstageatapuppetshow says: Mar 5, 2012 6:37 PM

    The question people should be asking in this situation is not whether or not it’s right or wrong to have bounties or who should be held accountable…after all….the Saints as well as their players are just as responsible for their actions as all the members of the Coaching Staff.

    The question should always be:

    Is this particular situation good for the sport of football?

    The protection of the sport is what is important, not the protection of the players who participate.

    If we protect the sport, “ALL” these other problems answer themselves….

    So to this end….both the Saints and Steve Young are guilty…neither are acting in a way that protects the sport.

  29. tjacks7 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:37 PM

    Good point. Was he in a competition to see who could use the word “institutionalized” the most?

  30. illwillthemick says: Mar 5, 2012 6:38 PM

    players CAN sue the saints AND the teams the players were on CAN sue the saints. (since it was the teams that paid for the medical bills of said hurt players) karma is a B!#$^ as they say… bye bye saints.

  31. dmobin says: Mar 5, 2012 6:41 PM

    It doesn’t matter if the injure more players on Defense, if they have evidence of a bounty system in place and run by the team (coaches knew about it and ran it) and a high profile player got hurt as a result I’d think that player would have a case. It would be tough to prove the bounty system was the reason the defensive player injured the offensive player, but I would think a grand jury would elect to allow the case to proceed to the courts. Doubt it would happen though since I can’t see big enough names suing players. Farvre basically said he doesn’t care much and reports are the Manning’s neck was caused by the Redskins while Williams was there and I highly doubt he’d sue, even if the evidence showed a direct bounty paid for that play.

  32. eleventy4 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:42 PM

    Yes injuries happen in football. But when they are premeditated and paid for, why should the context of a football game make them any different than assault in real life? If someone put someone in the hospital in a game of backyard football, and someone paid that person to do the injuring, you better bet they’d be in court. This shouldn’t be any different.

  33. jaggedmark says: Mar 5, 2012 6:43 PM

    For all you discounting what Steve Young says: What would you do if you had been carted off and lost an entire season due to an over the top and or illegal hit executed by the Saints during 2009-2011 seasons?

    After you think about that, you can come back on here and lie about what you would do and how it’s no big deal.

  34. eleventy4 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:44 PM

    And to answer the guy above, number of injuries is not important, honestly. Intent is what will make the difference here.

  35. babyhorsemorgan says: Mar 5, 2012 6:44 PM

    Absolutely they should sue. Football is not above, or separate from, the laws that govern society in general. Look at the price Brett Favre paid for the tactics they used to try to take him out of the game. It diminished his legacy, shortened his career, and deprived the fans and the league of potentially the biggest story in the history of the game. Everyone was shortchanged by the outcome of that NFC Championship game except the Saints.

  36. nineroutsider says: Mar 5, 2012 6:45 PM

    Love Steve, but I would skip his legal advice on this one…

    BTW, he doesn’t practice and doesn’t need business. He brings up an interesting issue and one the league must be very uneasy about. The Saints have created a mess that the league will have to clean up.

    The punishment must be harsh for this; can’t wait to see what it is. Saints fans dust those bags off, you’re gonna need them…

  37. riverhorsey says: Mar 5, 2012 6:47 PM

    That’s actually a good idea. It would put an end to it pretty quick because the owners wouldn’t want to be subject to all the lawsuits.

  38. JC says: Mar 5, 2012 6:49 PM

    That’s not AT ALL what he said! He said we live in a litigious society and he wouldn’t be surprised if someone did sue. You seriously are the king of twisting words.

  39. imsorrybojackson says: Mar 5, 2012 6:51 PM

    From a legal perspective, the “institutionalization” cited by Young will define the Saints’ culpability. If players were told by team employees that they’d be compensated for injuring specific players prior to the game, that would probably supersede the “assume the risk of injury” nature of contact sports that often makes these cases unsuccessful. It’s operating outside of the parameters of what has been, in the past, considered part of the game. It’s highly unlikely, but hypothetically, players and coaches could conceivably be prosecuted for assault. Depending on how long the owner knew, and whether the coaches and players could be cited as “rogue employees,” the Saints would at least be liable in civil court. It’s pretty serious stuff. Of course, you’d need evidence, or at least testimony, in each specific case, which would be hard to dredge up.

  40. gb4mn0 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:56 PM

    So what’s the Vegas line on the before or after date that the feeble minded vikequeef twit fans file a lawsuit against the Saints for undue psychological hardship suffered from the ’09’ NFCCG.

  41. billb49 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:00 PM

    Can some of you guys get it through your heads that Young is not just talking about hard hitting. He’s talking about institutionalized systems designed to hurt players. There’s a difference. His point is that if there is an institutionalized system, it’s violating the spirit of the game, intentionally depriving players of their ability to make a living and because of that, it goes beyond simply breaking the rules and into an area close to illegal activity.

    Young has historically been a proponent of self-policing among players when it comes to late hits and cheap shots. He has said many times that NFL o-line players often come to a QB or RB’s defense when a defense cheap shots or late hits them and he appreciates this about NFL players. But, this is different. This is an institutionalized method and system designed to hurt opposing players. There is a huge difference.

  42. ronaldmexico says: Mar 5, 2012 7:01 PM

    Young may have a point, but I don’t see any lawsuits happening as a practical matter. However, if a player pursues a claim against the Saints and related parties, he should make sure not to apply any balm on such injuries.

  43. stampnhawk says: Mar 5, 2012 7:06 PM

    Julius Jones went head on head with Lofa Tatupu at the end of that WC game.

    Didn’t play much the next week vs. Chicago, and that was that for his career to this point.

    He could be first in line if Jones got any money.

  44. imasturbate says: Mar 5, 2012 7:09 PM

    First of all this is getting blown waaaay out of proportion. If you don’t think kids in high school, college, and pro ball on the defensive side of the ball (excluding cornerbacks) aren’t trying to knockout/hurt (not handicap, calm down tree huggers) the offensive QB, running back, wide receiver, or tight end than you either haven’t played the game or you were a quarterback.

    Football fans love big hits.
    NASCAR fans love the wrecks.
    Boxing/UFC fans love knockouts.

    These guys get millions of dollars to take out the opposing teams quarterback…do you really think th 5 or 10k made them better? If it did whats the Pro Bowls excuse? They do for that weeks bragging rights to each other.

    BTW…if former players could sue the Saints then why couldn’t they also sue the NFL? It wasn’t like players were suspended or fined from the league so they were obviously playing with in the bounds of the League.

    Stop the madness…when Dale Earnhart died in NASCAR thy didn’t slow the cars down to 30 mph. They made the tracks safer, the cars safer, and the personal protective equipment safer. Do the same for the NFL already. If 150lb guys can wreck a car at 200mph why can’t the NFL come up with equipment to make the game safer?

  45. really2011 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:11 PM

    randolph32 says:
    Mar 5, 2012 6:33 PM
    @Paperlions…I was reading (can’t find it now dammit) that over the last few Seasons they were the highest penalized team, not that it necessarily leads to the most injuries from playing them, just sayin…

    ———————————————–

    #’s 12, 15, and 10 respectively in penalties per game

  46. themonster49 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:15 PM

    I have to agree with Steve Young for once.

    The argument that the NFL can keep it in house because they are all private employees, or because of the way the contacts and rules are structured, well I have news for that argument:

    You can write the best contract ever written, but if it contains something along the lines of say killing someone, injuring someone, or holding them accountable in a way that you can physically harm them, that contract 100% instantly goes out the window once presented in court. Gone. Invalid. Void.

    So what, is the NFL’s argument that their private employees, whom they are responsible for regarding all/any legal ramifications through the company perpetrated by these private employees, are responsible for themselves?

    If a supermarket employee harms you, you sue the supermarket, they fire the employee. It is the Exact same thing. Except in this case, the company is Even More liable due to the Fact that not only did their private employees do the acts, but they were paid and encouraged to do the acts by management. That specifically makes the NFL 100% liable. This could get bad.

  47. seanx40 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:15 PM

    I am not sure why everyone is opposed to the idea. And so angry. Young is correct. This went far beyond normal play where injuries are possible. This was institutionalized assault. The team, and coaches played their players to injure opponents. The team, the coaches, and the players that took the bounty money have opened themselves up to huge lawsuits. Remember, civil suits do not need to meet the same evidence as criminal court. A jury seeing some of those hits will decide pretty quickly that there was some wrong doing.

  48. harv44 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:17 PM

    For a guy that’s a lawyer he really makes some stupid statements.

  49. dcviking says: Mar 5, 2012 7:18 PM

    gb4mn0 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:56 PM

    So what’s the Vegas line on the before or after date that the feeble minded vikequeef twit fans file a lawsuit against the Saints for undue psychological hardship suffered from the ’09′ NFCCG.

    ———————————

    The first lawsuit would be to close the border with Wisconsin and keep you inbreds out of the US…

  50. revroy78 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:25 PM

    You know who I feel bad for? Bernard Pollard. Think of all the money the human career-wrecker could have made if he received payment for his performance. It’s just sad his talents were never properly recognized.

  51. omniscient48 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:27 PM

    1. Young also said that football is a “gentleman’s game”! I’d like to see him tell that to Chuck Bednarik or Dick Butkus or Ray Lewis.

    2. I thought Mike Golic made more sense than any of the others during the discussion today.

    3. I want to see a list of the players that were “knocked out” or “carted off” during the playoffs this year. The only knockout as I recall was Pierre Thomas getting KOd for the count by the helmet-to-helmet “legal” hit by Donte Whitner.

    4. I also want to read the report. Amazing how the “findings” have not yet been made public — why don’t they put all 50,00o pages (really????) online?

    5. Ray Lewis gets paid more than most linebackers. He gets paid the most because he hits the hardest and does the most damage. His “stats” are used to justify increases on his subsequent contracts. If Lewis knocks out 5 guys this year, he might get paid more next year than another linebacker who knocks out nobody. It’s not all that big of a difference. I’m just sayin

  52. vikingdoode says: Mar 5, 2012 7:33 PM

    Cedric Griffin was hurt during the 09′ championship game…..dude is now moving likes 80 years old man!

  53. Patriot42 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:35 PM

    I can understand if those are injured from a bounty put on a player but we just make see the decline of the NFL as we know it. It could be a lawyer’s gold mine but it could kill the goose that laid a golden egg for many players.

  54. jollyjoker2 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:37 PM

    They should all sue, there is a difference between an accident in the usual course of a game and paying someone to injure. At that point, a contract has taken place.

  55. uschawk says: Mar 5, 2012 7:38 PM

    This is not going to end well for the NFL. Money and lawyers ruin everything.

  56. jollyjoker2 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:41 PM

    Also, if the saints get off easy, than If I was any NFL team, I would hire some bone breakers. S rew the games, lets just start getting out the baseball bats. Heck, I could probably hire a few hundred quido’s for a couple of hundred grand to take out some knees and wipe out the opposing stars.

  57. ajpurp says: Mar 5, 2012 7:41 PM

    Suing a team has nothing to do with breaking a criminal law…You don’t have to break a law to be sued in tort. That’s the whole point of civil law.. Not everything is codified and It isn’t criminal. It’s duty, breach, causation, injury… The duty part is hard to prove in this case, as is causation but it is still absolutely arguable because every team can be said to have a duty to protect the safety of every player, that’s why the home teams provide medical facilities. I’m not saying they would win because of causation and it being much harder to show the defensive player would not have hit just as hard without incentive but it is certainly not impossible, especially given the institutional nature and the fact this is looked upon everywhere in our country outside of New Orleans as despicable. Players doing this on the side is one thing, teams and coaches is quite another

  58. thehatefulnerd says: Mar 5, 2012 7:42 PM

    I’m no lawyer but it seems to me that you would not only have to prove that there were bounties being offered, but that there were bounties being offered on YOU specifically.
    Then you’d have to prove that the person who injured you actually received the bounty.
    It also seems to me that the injury would have had to have occurred outside the established rules of the game. Injuries happen. You take that risk when you step on the field.

  59. scomibord says: Mar 5, 2012 7:55 PM

    you people are hilarious. Incidentally, the 2009 SB Champs were the 8th most penalized team in the year they became the champs…chumps!

  60. nomoreseasontix says: Mar 5, 2012 8:04 PM

    With all due respect, even with a law degree Steve Young is kind of an idiot.
    He rarely makes much sense in his jabbering.

  61. skinsfan5 says: Mar 5, 2012 8:13 PM

    please start the draft so we can stop talking about bounties

  62. darthhitman77 says: Mar 5, 2012 8:38 PM

    omniscient48 says: Mar 5, 2012 7:27 PM

    1. Young also said that football is a “gentleman’s game”! I’d like to see him tell that to Chuck Bednarik or Dick Butkus or Ray Lewis.

    2. I thought Mike Golic made more sense than any of the others during the discussion today.

    3. I want to see a list of the players that were “knocked out” or “carted off” during the playoffs this year. The only knockout as I recall was Pierre Thomas getting KOd for the count by the helmet-to-helmet “legal” hit by Donte Whitner.

    UM..I guess you’ve missed the whole James Harrisson deal over the last few years son BUT, helmet to helmet hits are NOT “legal”

  63. gb4mn0 says: Mar 5, 2012 9:20 PM

    dcviking says:
    Mar 5, 2012 7:18 PM
    gb4mn0 says: Mar 5, 2012 6:56 PM

    So what’s the Vegas line on the before or after date that the feeble minded vikequeef twit fans file a lawsuit against the Saints for undue psychological hardship suffered from the ’09′ NFCCG.

    ———————————

    The first lawsuit would be to close the border with Wisconsin and keep you inbreds out of the US…
    ———————————————

    So you’re admitting there will be a forthcoming lawsuit by you feeble minded vikequeef twit fans against the Saints?

    FYI, I was born in MN.

  64. whynotusecommonsense says: Mar 5, 2012 9:24 PM

    I can’t believe how many NFL fans agree with this idea. It’s crazy!

    First how do you differentiate between an injury caused by a bounty and one that would have happened anyway?

    And more troubling to me is that people don’t see what kind of a pandora’s box this could open. This would be such a negative for the NFL that the league as we know it would cease to exist. The NFL would no longer be the number one sport in America.

    Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.

  65. pmars64 says: Mar 5, 2012 9:55 PM

    This is rich coming from Young who played for a team who was well known for its offensive line going for the knees of opposing defensive players. Ask Howie Long what he thought of the Niners when he was playing because of their offensive line play. Isn’t this the origins of the zone blocking scheme used by several teams in the league today?

  66. bobhk says: Mar 5, 2012 10:07 PM

    @ tdk24

    several articles have pointed to the fact that this is not just breaking an NFL rule. Law enforcement could get into play just because this can be considered assault and battery with an explicit intent to injure (which is precisely what Vilma wanted to do).

    I think it’s pathetic that teams think that the only way to win is get a player off the field. I guess they don’t feel that they could win with theirs (and opponents) best players on the field, not to mention you are messing with someone’s ability to earn income.

  67. spfinne says: Mar 5, 2012 10:08 PM

    sounds like yardape74 is still bitter from all the ass whoopings steve young laid on the cardinals over the years. haha just saying

  68. nps6724 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:12 PM

    Can anyone name a player other than Brett Favre who was injured by the Saints due to an illegal hit? I can’t think of one and I’ve seen every Saints game during this timespan. The clip of Kurt Warner everyone keeps playing was 100% legal (shoulder-to-shoulder contact, occurred with Warner in the play, didn’t lead to a flag or a fine) so that’s not a valid claim.

    I also dare Young to try and prove any injuries happened due to anything but the act of playing professional football. Should Colt McCoy also sue James Harrison for the concussion he received due to an illegal hit?

    This just makes absolutely no sense. If you sign up to play football, you’re *going* to suffer injuries. And I don’t see how you can prove a bounty caused it.

  69. tomsd1 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:23 PM

    It’s also criminal to try and practice law without a license. :)

    Geesh: What do you think the standard is for average hits in the NFL? Probably quie a bit harder than what most peple take getting mugged in an alley. :)

  70. nps6724 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:25 PM

    bobhk says: Mar 5, 2012 10:07 PM

    @ tdk24

    several articles have pointed to the fact that this is not just breaking an NFL rule. Law enforcement could get into play just because this can be considered assault and battery with an explicit intent to injure (which is precisely what Vilma wanted to do).

    I think it’s pathetic that teams think that the only way to win is get a player off the field. I guess they don’t feel that they could win with theirs (and opponents) best players on the field, not to mention you are messing with someone’s ability to earn income.

    ———————————————

    You have to be naive if you think every defense’s goal *isn’t* to knock the opposition’s best players out of the game.

  71. tomsd1 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:26 PM

    BTW – since I started playing tackle football in the 7th grade back in the fall of 1958, it’s always been the intent to deliver a real hit on the opponent, pure and simple. Didn’t change through high school or college – and I have friends who played in the pros – and it’s the same story.

    Anybody hear of Ronnie Lott by the way?

  72. themonster49 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:38 PM

    Yeah youre going to suffer injuries. So after the whistle is blown,the ball is on the ground, and people are getting to their feet, its ok to grab a guys foot and roll your huge body into his knee and (watch closely next season to the piles) grimace and contort as you yank back with all your might on his leg? It is not ok. It is not ok to do that.

  73. bobhk says: Mar 5, 2012 11:12 PM

    @ tdk24

    several articles have pointed to the fact that this is not just breaking an NFL rule. Law enforcement could get into play just because this can be considered assault and battery with an explicit intent to injure (which is precisely what Vilma wanted to do).

    I think it’s pathetic that teams think that the only way to win is get a player off the field. I guess they don’t feel that they could win with theirs (and opponents) best players on the field, not to mention you are messing with someone’s ability to earn income.

    ———————————————

    You have to be naive if you think every defense’s goal *isn’t* to knock the opposition’s best players out of the game.
    ———————
    Maybe i am naive but the intent of the game is to stop the other team from advancing and scoring on you while you score.
    It’s not to knock people out and injure.
    Do you realize you are messing with someone’s future (i.e. livelihood)?

    Before you say that the sign up for that, they did not. The bounty system would encourage people to do helmet to helmet hit to knock someone out even if they would incur a fine.

    I for one, would rather see Manning play at a high level for longer not get injured.

    Also, I’m pretty sure no one is a lawyer on this board. Young’s opinion carries more weight.
    Many articles have pointed that this could become a law enforcement issue.

  74. rara4949 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:14 AM

    Some of these posts are rediculous… It’s no secret that defenses are always looking for the big hit however its NOT all about the hit… There are countless numbers of ways to injure another player.. Add to the fact that an incentive is thrown in to encourage injury is just sickening. In the real world, people are prosecuted everyday for assult and/or with the intent to injure another and this no different. Williams should be banned from the NFL along with the head coaches who he has been under wherever/whenever it occurred.

    Sueing the NFL is going to be quite difficult for those that are saying its going to get ugly. The prosecution would have to prove that the upper echelon of the NFL new about these bounties and allowed it to continue and that my friends isn’t happening unless several top NFL members step forward like the 20+ players that have confirmed these bounties issued by Gregg Williams… So until they do, there is no cause for concern

  75. bballdad says: Mar 6, 2012 12:27 AM

    Wow.! I guess Joe Montana should sue for the hit that allowed his career to be jump started. Ridiculous!!!

  76. ricksaints says: Mar 6, 2012 12:39 AM

    “institutionalize, institutionalize, institutionalize….”

  77. isuhater23 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:00 AM

    Everybody hates lawyers!….. Until you need one!

  78. nps6724 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:23 AM

    themonster49 says: Mar 5, 2012 10:38 PM

    Yeah youre going to suffer injuries. So after the whistle is blown,the ball is on the ground, and people are getting to their feet, its ok to grab a guys foot and roll your huge body into his knee and (watch closely next season to the piles) grimace and contort as you yank back with all your might on his leg? It is not ok. It is not ok to do that.

    ——————————————–

    Except no one is advocating that. Point out one person advocating that.

    At what point do you draw the line between illegal-in-football-but-legal-in-life hits and illegal-in-football-and-in-life hits? If I walk up to someone on the street and hit them with a perfect form tackle, that’s assault. Yet these guys do it on a field and it’s legal. So you have to draw the line where football stops and life takes over. If anything the Saints did could lead to legal action, then James Harrison better be the next guy sued after all the concussions he’s caused on illegal hits to the helmet. And then next should be Bernard Pollard who went low on Brady and also tore Welker’s ACL. And from there we can continue down the slippery slope.

  79. sixjak says: Mar 6, 2012 2:27 AM

    yardape74 says:
    Mar 5, 2012 6:07 PM
    Still bitter from getting planted into the ASU grass by Anenaes Williams. I always hated Young and still do.

     No he’s more bitter about Lawrence Phillips whiffing on the block of AW. Lawrence Phillips sucks. Get your football facts straight.

    Oh and… I always hated you and still do.

  80. joyjoy69 says: Mar 6, 2012 2:32 AM

    whynotusecommonsense says: Mar 5, 2012 9:24 PM

    I can’t believe how many NFL fans agree with this idea. It’s crazy!

    First how do you differentiate between an injury caused by a bounty and one that would have happened anyway?

    And more troubling to me is that people don’t see what kind of a pandora’s box this could open. This would be such a negative for the NFL that the league as we know it would cease to exist. The NFL would no longer be the number one sport in America.

    Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.

    ——————————-

    Only one real difference, I guess: intent. Of course, that is the difference between murder, manslaughter and justifiable homicide as well.

    When players who chose to play a sport that is physical and violent get hurt, that is part of the game. When a person goes on to the field with the sole intent of hurting another person, they aren’t playing football. They are committing a crime.

    No, we can’t know each individual player’s intent when their play injures another player. But we can know the intent of the players who cashed the check after injuring a player, and we can know the intent of a coach who offers to pay a player to hurt another player. The fact that they don’t get why it is a crime doesn’t excuse them from the fact that they deliberately chose to offer money to a person to hurt another person.

    This is no pandora’s box: it will be very difficult to prove intent 99% of the time. In this case, intent is established. If the league doesn’t make a clear statement that this kind of activity is NOT OK, they will be legally culpable for the next time.

  81. grannyvi4 says: Mar 6, 2012 2:58 AM

    gb4mn0 says:Mar 5, 2012 6:56 PM

    So what’s the Vegas line on the before or after date that the feeble minded vikequeef twit fans file a lawsuit against the Saints for undue psychological hardship suffered from the ’09′ NFCCG.
    ==============================
    Oh just shut up, psycho.

    Regarding Steve Young’s comments, however, that was one of the first things I thought of when the bounty news broke — that players from all over the league (not just the Vikings — get the freaking name right gb4mno, you twit) might line up for a payout from the Saints if they were injured while playing them. As another poster said, everyone now knows they played with a bounty system during those years, and in some jurors’ minds, that’s all they’ll need to know.

  82. gimmeabruschi says: Mar 6, 2012 3:04 AM

    If fans sued the Patriots over spygate somebody will sue the Saints over this. But in this case they will probably get something more out of it than a legal fee.

  83. jcf78 says: Mar 6, 2012 7:23 AM

    People are lame asses!!!!! In a court you need to prove intent!!!! The fact that the bounty system was proven is intent enough for grounds to sue! However, considering the nature of the sport you would need a really liberal judge to award damages for a pulled hammy! :). Sorry saints fans as a 49er fan I enjoyed this years playoffs, but was rooting for you in that super bowl!! Used to love the old NFC west!!!! Pat swilling, Sam mills, Ricky Jackson, toi cook!!!! Does were BAD MEN!!!

  84. ddmur says: Mar 6, 2012 7:41 AM

    Ok, assume that a pro-bowl quality player has a career ended by an illegal chop block. Assume also that a team has a policy in place where the player who caused the injury is “rewarded” with a $15,000.00 bonus. Is there anyone out there that will be angry with the player and his attorney for suing the team that has a policy in place to reward such behavior? What am I overlooking?

  85. trapshoot says: Mar 6, 2012 8:36 AM

    I’m sure Young would gladly participate in any case for his 33-1/3% of the payoff. Exactly why we have too many damned lawyers in this country.

  86. tdk24 says: Mar 6, 2012 9:08 AM

    “several articles have pointed to the fact that this is not just breaking an NFL rule. Law enforcement could get into play just because this can be considered assault and battery with an explicit intent to injure (which is precisely what Vilma wanted to do).”

    Well, then you open a whole new can of worms. What about fighting in hockey? What about a pitcher hitting a batter on purpose? What about MMA and boxing? What about intentionally wrecking someone in racing? You want to separate all those clearly intentional assaults from that are just “part of the game” from guys that are paid to make tackles on every single play? How is making a tackle somehow more criminal? James Harrison doesn’t need a bounty to try to end careers and everyone seems happy to just see him pay a fine, over and over and over and over.

  87. dar948 says: Mar 6, 2012 9:22 AM

    If this is going to be the case, look out Boxing Association and UFC. Where will it end?

  88. stanleybucasas says: Mar 6, 2012 11:58 AM

    So many ignorant comments by self-righteous idealists and self-proclaimed football “purists.”

    This issue goes far beyond just playing good hard-nosed football. It’s about safety and image, but I don’t expect you guys to be able to wrap primitive brains around that.

    Gregg Williams needs to be banned, the GM fired, and Payton should be gone as well. In addition to the loss of draft picks, Drew Brees should be able to be “de-franchised” and take his services somewhere else

  89. briank1ne says: Mar 6, 2012 2:28 PM

    the real question is. Did donte whitner get paid? Cause that was a milliondollar ass whippin.

  90. ceadderman says: Mar 6, 2012 10:44 PM

    Holy Hell, Steve Young didn’t say that they SHOULD sue. He was implying that if this goes as deep into the Saints organization as it looks like it does that anyone injured on the field by their institutionalized malfeasance, pretty much has a case.

    Benson knew about this. The league told him in 2009. But that doesn’t mean he’s off the hook. Owners know what is going on with their team. Anyone think that Jerry Jones all the way down to the less hands on Robert Kraft don’t know what goes on with their teams? If you buy that I’ve got a lovely Condo on the moon up for sale that I would let you have real cheap. Excellent scenic views, no smog, and not a single neighbor for miles.

    Oh and to the tards that think Young tanked in Tampa… you obviously never saw the Bucs during Young’s career there. Jimmy Raye couldn’t call a good game if the Bucs (or the 9ers) offered a lifetime supply of Depends and the Runner up in the Miss America contest to help him change em.

    Young is correct though. If this goes all the way to the top, and depending on how many names are on the bounty list Players could definitely sue.

  91. tomsd1 says: Mar 7, 2012 4:12 AM

    Sometimes – Steve Young engages mouth before brain finishes work. And yes, he surely did encourage the Saints’ opponents to sue.

    Despite being a bit prissy – he’s an ok guy – until he starts to try to hard to be the show. Then he tanks.

  92. castle197 says: Apr 1, 2012 8:01 AM

    Steve Young is the biggest hypocrite on ESPN. I am sure he told Ronnie Lott and others of that famed 49er defense of his day to not hit opposing players so hard that they might get injured or knocked out. Yeah Steve, I bet you did just that. I have some nice ocean front property in New Mexico for sale, real cheap… you interested?

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