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Scott Fujita says he paid teammates, but not for causing injuries

Scott Fujita AP

Browns linebacker Scott Fujita has admitted that during his time with the Saints he participated in what Gregg Williams called the “pay for performance program.” But Fujita says his payments were limited to giving money to teammates who made good, clean plays, and that he never paid bounties for injuries.

“Over the years I’ve paid out a lot of money for big plays like interceptions, sacks and special teams tackles inside the 20,” Fujita told Peter King of Sports Illustrated. “But I’ve never made a payment for intentionally injuring another player.”

Fujita, who played under Williams in New Orleans in 2009, has been particularly outspoken about the need to make player safety a priority. He is on the NFL Players Association’s executive board and has pushed for reducing full-contact practices and increasing care for retired players who suffer long-term health consequences from injuries suffered on the field.

Given that, it’s surprising to hear Fujita’s name connected with the Saints bounty case. But not surprising to hear Fujita say that his involvement was strictly limited to fair play.

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76 Responses to “Scott Fujita says he paid teammates, but not for causing injuries”
  1. touchdownroddywhite says: Mar 6, 2012 12:51 PM

    It’s amazing how much deeper this is than Spygate…. And that’s why I fully believe the Goodell isn’t going to drop a hammer.

    He’ll use an anvil instead…

  2. zeapelido says: Mar 6, 2012 12:51 PM

    but what about the other players, Scott?

  3. saints25 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:53 PM

    An thats what tey will all say!!!This will end up to being Nothing. ..LMAO

  4. jaltreality says: Mar 6, 2012 12:54 PM

    This seems to be a consistent, and therefore perhaps credible, remark made by defensive players who, you know, actually played in the defenses in question. “We paid money, but not to injure players.”

  5. alewatcher says: Mar 6, 2012 12:54 PM

    touchdownroddywhite says: Mar 6, 2012 12:51 PM

    It’s amazing how much deeper this is than Spygate…. And that’s why I fully believe the Goodell isn’t going to drop a hammer.

    He’ll use an anvil instead…

    ———–
    This is going to be more along the lines of a tactical nuke before it’s over.

  6. saints25 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:55 PM

    An thats what they will all say!!!This will end up to being Nothing. ..LMAO

  7. thatobnoxiousguy says: Mar 6, 2012 12:55 PM

    The whole system in New Orleans was limited to playing football the way it used to be played.

    Goodell is turning the NFL into the NFFL (National Flag Fooball League)

    The Saints and Williams did N O T H I N G that tried to end careers,,,,,, unlike James Harrison.

    The Saints and Williams didn’t cheat,,,,,, unlike the Patriots.

    Williams insituted a “bonus” program that got his players to play a lil harder and together. Companies do this all the time.

    I have yet to hear anybody say that Williams system intent was to seriously injure or end the career of anyone.

    Why isn’t Goodell quickly destroying evidence and sweeping this under the rug like SpyGate????

    Because he has to show that he severely punished a team as part of the leagues defense against all these lawsuits being filed by ex-players.

    Lawsuits by ex-players sueing the league for injuries that the KNEW was part of the job description and a very likely reality is damaging this league as much as Goodell is.

    Whatever punishment Williams gets……..James Harrison should get as well.

  8. millermt17 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:57 PM

    Note that Fujita said he never “made a payment”. Not denying he didn’t “offer a payment” to whoever could knock Favre out of the NFC championship game.

  9. terraj35 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:58 PM

    The Saints will have suspensions, fines, lost draft picks. Not to mention Brees isn’t happy with his contract and they could be losing Nicks, Colston, and Maechem.
    No players will wanna go to New Orleans. The winners in this whole situation: the other NFC South teams. Go Bucs!

  10. clayton43 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:58 PM

    Never liked this guy for some reason…..

  11. thraiderskin says: Mar 6, 2012 1:00 PM

    hypocrite… yeah, I bet you only paid for clean hits! Who is this dude kidding, he talks about players safety then participates in a program that not only condoned bone-jarring hits, but advanced the idea of hurting players out of games. Like there is no likely-hood that has lasting effects. The same effects he was crying about during the lockout. Shouldn’t this guy, who pushed the issue of lasting injuries to players after they retire, have been the sort of person to “blow the whistle”?

  12. cowboycjn says: Mar 6, 2012 1:01 PM

    Now is that your final answer Scott??? Sort of sounds like a CYA statement to me, or if the pay for performance was just as you said (no injuries), does that mean in 2009 season when Saints won the SB, that everybody else is wrong and no one was trying to hurt anyone?? Now which is it???

    Personally I think if the Saints were hitting extra hard or aggressively – so what if it was a legal hit, thats football. If they made illegal hits – isn’t that what they have refs on the field for – to throw the flag and stop that sort of activity?? The real investigation should be the officiating staff if they allowed such stuff.

  13. uwsptke says: Mar 6, 2012 1:01 PM

    In the end, it probably won’t matter much whether he paid other players for clean or dirty hits when it comes down to punishment. Everything he admitted to is still 100% against the rules, and the law if you want to drag the IRS aspect into this again.

  14. hystoracle says: Mar 6, 2012 1:01 PM

    How do all these “Bounty” or undisclosed “incentive” programs work within a cap system? Sounds like a vehicle for cap circumvention. Especially, if administered by members of the team/management. Players are going to do what they do away from the facility – can’t stop that. But DC’s, Head coaches, and GMs orchestrating it or allowing it to be orchestrated by DC’s or position coaches seems to run a foul of the cap. I thought these guys got incentives put in their Contracts? Are we going to see Cart-offs being added to contracts in the near future? And is that a Likely-to-be-earned or unlikely-to-be-earned incentive er bonus?

  15. chatham10 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:02 PM

    Why waste time talking to Fujita and Sharper etc, these guy will admit nothing and it is a waste of time. These guys were part of the process .

  16. bobwhitequail says: Mar 6, 2012 1:02 PM

    Greg Williams needs to be banned for life. He is the instigator of the whole thing and did it on numerous teams. If you don’t ban him he’ll just keep it going under the table.

    What they did to Farve was just wrong, and I don’t care if you like or hate Favre, it was just wrong trying to intentionally injure him every single play. I remember that game. It was disgusting to see.

  17. preventoffense says: Mar 6, 2012 1:03 PM

    If they paid “a lot” of money is it documented? Forget about the tax implications, what about the salary cap implications?

  18. chalkruz1989 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:04 PM

    I wish my boss would pay me for doing my job then pay me again for doing my job. Did I miss something or don’t most NFL players get paid a decent amount? This whole bounty thing is just a perfect example on what’s wrong with the NFL today. I understand bonuses, but, getting paid to do what you’re already being paid to do sounds redundant.

  19. audient says: Mar 6, 2012 1:08 PM

    I would like to believe Fujita’s remarks.

  20. 11inthebox says: Mar 6, 2012 1:09 PM

    Wow. Really? If there’s evidence that someone brought a hypodermic needle onto the field an injected an opponent with a debilitating substance like in the M*A*S*H movie) I’ll join in all this girly hysteria.

    But if we’re just talking hard hits and big plays, people need to get a grip.

  21. clintonportisheadd says: Mar 6, 2012 1:09 PM

    He sounds like that idiot Golic.

    Somehow the payment of money for “big hits” is OK as long as the hit is “legal”. And it’s ok to pay a bounty if you knock out the other team’s stars “as long as the hit that took them out of the game is “legal’”.

    I dare a player to come forward and say “I was expecting to collect big bucks for putting their QB out of the game BUT since I got flagged they wouldn’t pay me”. OR a player or coach to say “We reviewed film on Monday and only “big hits” that we collectively judged as “legal” got paid for.

    The whole sideshow about legal vs illegal hits being ok in any bounty system needs to end. Its a distinction without a difference.

  22. whatigot8 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:11 PM

    Quail why werent any of the hits called?

  23. weekendatberniemadoffs says: Mar 6, 2012 1:12 PM

    scott, do you mean like when you sent that cheap shot into steve smith’s knees a couple years back?

  24. Loose Changeup says: Mar 6, 2012 1:14 PM

    “Forget about the tax implications, what about the salary cap implications?”

    How does a payment from one player to another, on the same team and under the same salary cap, have salary cap implications?

    The only way this has salary cap implications is if 1) payments came from outside the system (coaches or “boosters”) AND 2) the team was so close to hitting the cap that this money from outside exceeds the cap space available.

    Even with a $50k fund, no team gets that close to the cap.

  25. thraiderskin says: Mar 6, 2012 1:16 PM

    This issue didn’t blow up because of “bounties”, it blew up because of “hits.” Hitting a guy hard in an attempt to make him think about it is a lot different then trying to a hit a guy “out” of a game. Hitting a guy hard is what football is all about, attempting to hurt him enough he physically can not continue is another. These were “hits” that went well outside of the game of football, well beyond what physicality is assumed. I would make the arguement that it is criminal, society accepts that football is violent and you could get injured, this action circumvents that notion by attempting to injure. Williams (and any staff aware) should be seen as a man who put hits out on players, then proceeded to help fund the rewards.

  26. nineroutsider says: Mar 6, 2012 1:16 PM

    saints25 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:53 PM

    An thats what tey will all say!!!This will end up to being Nothing. ..LMAO
    —————————————————————
    It doesn’t matter how these hypocrites try to sway the public, the leagues knows what it knows and is largely past the investigation phase. So keep laughing while you can…

  27. gavinmac says: Mar 6, 2012 1:17 PM

    The question that Sharper and Fujita and others should be asked, and should answer, is whether they ever paid or received bonuses based on knocking another player out of a game.

    It seems that they did, but now they are claiming that “payment for a ‘big hit’ knocking another player out of a game” is different from “payment for intentionally injuring another player.” It’s not. It’s the same.

  28. PFTiswhatitis says: Mar 6, 2012 1:18 PM

    *Saints

    A bounty program to knock key players out of the game amounts to competitive advantage. In other words, CHEATING but worse. Trying to injure your fellow players is as low as it gets.

  29. rolltide510 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:19 PM

    Its funny to see these guys so desperate to clear their name they open their mouths and dig the hole deeper and deeper. Agents should be telling their clients to keep their mouths shut.

  30. PFTiswhatitis says: Mar 6, 2012 1:22 PM

    Way to CYA Fujita. That statement has ZERO credibility.

  31. rawgator06 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:23 PM

    Why is James Harrison’s name being brought up by posters? Hate the Steelers when they do something wrong, not when Williams gets busted for bounty programs. I’m pretty sure he was never the Steelers DC.

  32. cdaws84 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:25 PM

    @thatobnoxiousguy

    Bonuses are in contracts…not additional revenue by coaches or peers….Violating the cap…is cheating…

    Not paying taxes on income..apparently “a lot” according to Fujita…is cheating the US tax system

    What player would be dumb enough to outright confess taking payment for injuring someone? They would more than likely face a life long suspension…Want visual evidence? Watch the cardinal and viking playoff games…more evidence…Sharper said himself…x marks the spot..in regards to favres ankle. You really dont think anyone in that saints locker room…put a bounty out on hitting it?

  33. hairpie says: Mar 6, 2012 1:25 PM

    The reason Goddell cant sweep this under the rug like Spygate is b/c other teams have ALREADY admitted to doing this. Goddell wanted to make an example of the Pats so he destroyed the evidence of other teams doing the same thing. Obviously trying to avoid a situation like he currently has.

  34. cwmorga says: Mar 6, 2012 1:27 PM

    @terraj35 says: Mar 6, 2012 12:58 PM

    The Saints will have suspensions, fines, lost draft picks. Not to mention Brees isn’t happy with his contract and they could be losing Nicks, Colston, and Maechem.
    No players will wanna go to New Orleans. The winners in this whole situation: the other NFC South teams. Go Bucs!
    ———————-

    Nothing will be more satisfying than winning the NFC South again despite sanctions from the league.

  35. falconsfan says: Mar 6, 2012 1:27 PM

    Who Dat is going to take on a whole new meaning in a short period of time. Who Dat on the field? Who Dat Coach? Who Dat playing QB?

  36. falconsfan says: Mar 6, 2012 1:29 PM

    Some of these players need to just keep their mouths shut unless they’re specifically told to answer questions by the NFL. There’s too much room for lawsuits and other legal matters than to spout off on the record to a local radio station.

  37. rooney24 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:30 PM

    To “thatobnoxiousguy”: At least you have an accurate moniker.

    To those talking about salary cap and such, from what I have heard, most of the money came from money the players pooled, so it is money from the team itself, so it wouldn’t result in more money paid to players overall. If the coaches paid in some money, then it might be borderline, but when you compare coach salaries to player salaries, I am guessing coaches didn’t pay in that much of they own money.

  38. shoooootum says: Mar 6, 2012 1:30 PM

    Can someone please tell us who the snitch is please?

  39. ttommytom says: Mar 6, 2012 1:31 PM

    This is turning into criminal proceedings. And as usual, people talk way too much. This is getting uglier by the day.

    Personally, I am glad they are. There WAS something odd in that Favre game. No we know.

    Williams HAS to be banned for 5 years. That will, in essence be a lifetime ban.

    If you do something long enough whether it is good or bad, you will be rewarded accordingly. Williams will be rewarded accordingly. Cya!!!

  40. colt2011 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:31 PM

    The plot thickens. Any way you look at it, players and coaching staff + GM + Owner of Saints knew what Williams was promoting. They ignored it, took part in it, covered it up. Williams is the biggest disgrace and he’s moved from team to team to avoid detection. Not anymore. He should not be allowed in the NFL or any football program. Saints aren’t the only team he infected, but they definitely are the scapegoats. Their dirty play was much too obvious, got increasingly worse in 3 years. Anyone who played with this team from 09-11 knew damn well what was going on. Too bad no one had the balls to stop it from the start.

  41. 3yardsndust says: Mar 6, 2012 1:35 PM

    When you’re talking about widespread tax fraud and conspiracy, you’re talking about Congressional hearings. Like it or not, they’re coming.

  42. SOBEIT says: Mar 6, 2012 1:36 PM

    Who cares what they say in a PR. It only matters when they say it in front of Goodell. This is going to have immediate and long term ramifications.

    What will football look like next year and beyond…for the fans? Playing D in the NFL just got a lot harder. Offense stats should jump through the roof. We shall see. But this is no longer football as I remember as a kid in the 70s & 80s.

  43. ricksaints says: Mar 6, 2012 1:37 PM

    Bring back Tagliabu!!!! This guy will single handedly kill the NFL. He is more interested in creating his own legacy rather than keeping the NFL the way it was before he got here. If its not broken don’t break it Goodell. And all u “fans” that are jumping on his bandwagon I want to see you cheer for him one he turns this into the Two Hand Touch League….. Oh wait scratch that someone might break a nail.

  44. philwauke says: Mar 6, 2012 1:38 PM

    I didn’t inhale.

  45. dpndots says: Mar 6, 2012 1:38 PM

    There are bounties in poker tournaments that motivate players to play crazy against others.
    There are bounties on soccer teams to bet who scores first.
    Basketball probably has a bounty system too, for huge blocks or however many points you score.
    There are bounties you don’t know about fluttering around your office, with the guys dealing to see who breaks under a set’up experiment.
    Bounties could be going on in your universities, with professors side betting on how long it takes you to graduate.

    Bounties are global

  46. rexryanstoecheese says: Mar 6, 2012 1:38 PM

    talk about a non-story.

    What the Hell else is he gonna say?

    “Yeah, I fully participated and tried to break every bone in the offensive players body on every down because I had several grand riding on it?”

    Sheesh!

  47. imaginesuperbowlwin says: Mar 6, 2012 1:41 PM

    PFTiswhatitis says:
    Mar 6, 2012 1:22 PM
    Way to CYA Fujita. That statement has ZERO credibility.

    ———————————————-
    Well, shucks. Now I don’t know WHO to believe, Sharper or Fujita?

    I still want to know if anyone paid a bounty to Jimmy Graham for taking out Payton’s knee last season.

  48. conormacleod says: Mar 6, 2012 1:42 PM

    You’re right, I haven’t heard anybody say that they were paid to end a guys career. They just offered up cash if you laid a hit on somebody so that they got “carted off”. Now, if that particular hit actually ended somebodies career, I guess that was just a “bonus”, eh fellas? “Carted off” vs. “Interceptions, Sacks, and special teams tackles inside the 20″. I’m guessing the NFL has a little bit more evidence than what Mr. Fujita is admitting to.

  49. theemrsanity says: Mar 6, 2012 1:43 PM

    Two things worth noting…

    1. Fujita only played under Williams for one year and then left as a FA.

    2. His standing among the union, the players, and the league is very high. The league likely brought him in knowing they would get a perspective on the situation that was relatively informed, but more importantly, one representative of the players in moving forward.

    Remember, the league has to play a little CYA, while at the same time looking concerned about the players. The more they hammer those involved, the more culpable they become by admitting the existence and severity of these type of incentives.

  50. falconsfan says: Mar 6, 2012 1:47 PM

    shoooootum,
    Kim Kardashian is the snitch… she was hanging around Reggie only a few months ago…

  51. crp63 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:48 PM

    I really don’t understand what these guys are thinking.Can they not figure out to shut up?.When your companies boss,in this case Goodell,does’nt support a particular behavior the last thing you do is admit to partaking in said behavior( publicly no less) and expect that his way of thinking has no effect on you at all.Speak when spoken to by Goodell and quit talking to the talking heads in the media.They truely deserve everything they’ve got coming to them.

  52. gmen1987 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:49 PM

    Would love to see Hines Ward get a shot at Scott.

  53. conormacleod says: Mar 6, 2012 1:49 PM

    “Bounties are global”???? Um, ok. But bounties to hurt somebody is also called a “hit”, which some might think is illegal. And those some might be called Police Officers, Prosecutors, and Judges. So, good luck with your bounties.

  54. georgebrett says: Mar 6, 2012 1:50 PM

    There is way more to all of this than we will ever know about and 2 sides as well.

  55. emmac13 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:53 PM

    This Bountygate is popping up on PFT as much as the blonde in suglasses and big cans. Difference is Bountygate is getting old.

  56. bucfandango says: Mar 6, 2012 1:56 PM

    I can’t help but wonder if the refs that allowed the Saints to beat the crap out of Brett Favre were paid bounties too. Too many blatant late hits were ignored in that championship game and the whole NFL smells like dead fish right about now. Except my Bucs, they just smell like garbage.

  57. judsonjr says: Mar 6, 2012 1:58 PM

    So how much did this turd get for rolling up Steve Smith’s legs.

  58. cdaws84 says: Mar 6, 2012 1:59 PM

    @rooney24

    Players also make money via marketing…how do you determine what dollars were from the team..or from their own personal revenue streams…you can’t thus any additional payments made by players would have to be viewed as outside revenue not internal.

  59. mikemcdorman says: Mar 6, 2012 2:02 PM

    How is the so-called bounty controversy any different to a manager giving a prize fighter a bonus for a win by K.O. over a T.K.O.?

    It’s NOT ILLEGAL in football to knock a guy out of the game, or to try to do so.

    Rather, guys are supposed to try to knock each other out of the game — within the rules — which is all that seems to have been going on with the Saints and almost certainly with every other team in the league.

    No one — to my knowledge — is claiming that players were rewarded for those illegal plays. And players should be allowed to reward one another for big, legal, defensive plays, including those that knock a guy out of the game. Why? Because getting knocked out of the game, as in rugby, boxing, UFC, judo, etc., is part of it.

    It’s always been part of it.

    If the Saints were paying bonuses for unsportsmanlike conduct penalties, we’d have a problem, but that’s not the case!

    The refs do a good enough job policing the game on the field, without need of dragging the league through the mud over a common practice that grown men have knowingly chosen to undertake together.

    These sorts of witch hunts are just bad for the sport.

  60. nyjetsfan08 says: Mar 6, 2012 2:03 PM

    Sharper said as much. I honestly don’t know what to think about all this. I would like to think that the NFL’s source(s) is not entirely correct, that the bounty was for big plays but not dirty plays. It’s just so crazy. Why would Team A’s defense want to ‘stretcher out’ Team B’s offense, knowing that there could be retaliation?

    Boomer talked a little about that this morning. He said that’s why the chop-block is against the rules, because it was the only way for offensive linemen to retaliate against dirty defensive players.

    These players are all part of the same union and, yet, some players are apparently participating in a bounty program to take out players for…just one game? 2 games? An entire career? What is it? I just don’t know.

    Then these same players will complain about the NFL failing to protect the players from unneccessary injuries and concussions.

  61. mikemcdorman says: Mar 6, 2012 2:07 PM

    @clintonportisheadd

    C’mon man, are you kidding?

    Legal/Illegal is a distinction without a difference?

    You can’t really believe that. Without that distinction, the game wouldn’t exist, because there would be no rules, by definition.

    It makes all the difference in the world whether player to player financial rewards were exchanged for

    A) only legal plays — in which it’s FINE
    or
    B) some illegal plays — in which it’s NOT FINE

    The whole morality of the situation turns on whether the hits that led to rewards were legal or illegal. Because the men signed up to take legal hits, but not illegal hits.

    Stop confusing yourself.

  62. cmarsh64 says: Mar 6, 2012 2:12 PM

    Lets not forget the NFL has 50,000 papers backing up the bounty program,so it’s not a question of if it happened thats a fact. But to what degree and the fact Williams admitted it and overseen it is wrong.If the salary cap was violated in anyway this is even more serious.If the IRS gets into this because money was won and not reported this will get real ugly,real quick.Lying to the Feds carries a more stiffer penality.Bounties are not allowed PERIOD and its in the rules and Fujita and Brees are both on the Competition commitee and for them to know about or be involved in any way is wrong.

  63. ravensgrl says: Mar 6, 2012 2:15 PM

    thatobnoxiousguy says:
    Mar 6, 2012 12:55 PM

    Williams insituted a “bonus” program that got his players to play a lil harder and together. Companies do this all the time.

    I have yet to hear anybody say that Williams system intent was to seriously injure or end the career of anyone.
    _______________

    I would say paying a player the bounty if someone was taken off the field on a stretcher or had to stay out of the game would be to “seriously injure”

  64. johntonioholmes says: Mar 6, 2012 2:19 PM

    thatobnoxiousguy

    Dude…you could not possibly be any dumber.

    Harrison has a bad rep because he hits too hard.

    If any of those Saints defenders knew how to even tackle, they would have WAY worse reputations than Harrison.

    Those defensive backs launch with the crown of their helmet ALL OF THE TIME. The difference is, they don’t knock people out.

    Heck even a HOFer like Ray Lewis hasn’t knocked as many people out as Harrison and Lewis has more helmet to helmet hits since 2007 than James Harrison does.

    You only know about Harrison because the league made you notice. How is it that he has 5 fines in the last 6 fines in the last 3 years and no one even NOTICED that the Saints were specifically hitting players after the play was dead?

    Maybe because the league was watching Harrison.

    He has 2 late hits, 2 helmet to helmet hits and 2 unnecessary roughness penalties out about 4500 defensive snaps, yet you’re concerned about him?

    The Saints hit Favre on all 60 offensive plays that day, and they got one penalty.

    You’re clueless.

  65. zaggs says: Mar 6, 2012 2:19 PM

    Way to try to avoid a suspension.

  66. tarheelpirate says: Mar 6, 2012 2:25 PM

    Why does anyone think that Scott Fujita is a good guy? Take a look at the cheap shot that he took at Steve Smith’s knee a while back. Keep in mind that this was prior to Gregg Williams in New Orleans. Fujita is just dirty.

    It was one of the dirtiest hits I have ever seen. Amazingly, Smitty didn’t get hurt, but I would like to know if there was a bounty on him.

    *Fujita cheap shot on Steve Smith (youtube)

  67. dfinpds says: Mar 6, 2012 2:28 PM

    I guess if someone “accidently” takes out brees, that will just be “good hard football the way it used to be played”, and the “whodat” nation won’t scream or whine about it? Yeah right

  68. zn0rseman says: Mar 6, 2012 2:30 PM

    It doesn’t matter. No punishment matters.

    Because in the end, even if you gave the Vikings all of the Saints draft picks, and fined every player and coach, the Saints still have a Lombardi Trophy and Super Bowl rings, and the Vikings don’t.

  69. imaginesuperbowlwin says: Mar 6, 2012 2:42 PM

    dpndots says:
    Mar 6, 2012 1:38 PM
    There are bounties in poker tournaments that motivate players to play crazy against others.
    There are bounties on soccer teams to bet who scores first.
    Basketball probably has a bounty system too, for huge blocks or however many points you score.
    There are bounties you don’t know about fluttering around your office, with the guys dealing to see who breaks under a set’up experiment.
    Bounties could be going on in your universities, with professors side betting on how long it takes you to graduate.

    Bounties are global

    ————————————————–

    Okay, so you’ll be all right if YOUR boss (assuming you have one) offers YOUR co-worker (assuming again that you have one) X amount of dollars to run over you with the forklift and put you on worker’s comp for a year or more (assuming you have a job)?

    Bounties might be “global” but assault and battery are AGAINST the law. It doesn’t make it right.

  70. dpndots says: Mar 6, 2012 3:35 PM

    Okay, so you’ll be all right if YOUR boss (assuming you have one) offers YOUR co-worker (assuming again that you have one) X amount of dollars to run over you with the forklift and put you on worker’s comp for a year or more (assuming you have a job)?

    Bounties might be “global” but assault and battery are AGAINST the law. It doesn’t make it right.

    —————————————————-

    SIR you are proving my point. I never said assault/battery isn’t against the law…where did you read that?
    What I AM saying though is that this world is corrupt and even if you’re not inflicting pain on someone, don’t you think it’s even more messed up to destroy marriages because of the collusion that is going on around the poker tables? It doesn’t even become gambling at that point with these silent bounties that are unaware to the field of tournament players right?

    And seriously, who knows if James Harrison and Suh are struggling to speak up right now? Their NFL images are being ruined…while Keith Butler and Kris Kocurek are paying them to keep quiet. WHO KNOWS.

    And NO I’m not working, NO I don’t have co-workers, and NO I’m not making money right now, BUT one day when I do, I guarantee you I will be aware of secret bounties and side bets that goes on around the office. Maybe it’s just me who’s run into a lot of bad friends or angle shooters, and I’ve had enough with the the schemer behind the scenes trying to get that promotion. It’s not fair.

  71. farmmbig says: Mar 6, 2012 3:41 PM

    Can someone get Jabari Greer’s statement on this issue?….

    I’d be really interested to know how much he would’ve gotten to injure Adrian Peterson this past season—

    Watch the game— One play, Adrian goes off on Greer after a play/tackle. After the game, AD commented that Greer was intentionally twisting his leg after the play was over.

  72. fcs34 says: Mar 6, 2012 3:51 PM

    And back rubs Scott, don’t forget the back rubs.

  73. cowboycjn says: Mar 6, 2012 3:53 PM

    This is your quote:
    thraiderskin says: Mar 6, 2012 1:16 PM
    This issue didn’t blow up because of “bounties”, it blew up because of “hits.” Hitting a guy hard in an attempt to make him think about it is a lot different then trying to a hit a guy “out” of a game. Hitting a guy hard is what football is all about, attempting to hurt him enough he physically can not continue is another. These were “hits” that went well outside of the game of football, well beyond what physicality is assumed. I would make the arguement that it is criminal, society accepts that football is violent and you could get injured, this action circumvents that notion by attempting to injure. Williams (and any staff aware) should be seen as a man who put hits out on players, then proceeded to help fund the rewards.
    – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - –
    OK- so if hits went well outside the game of football, well beyond what physicality is assumed (as you said) Why does the ref not throw the flag to call un-necessary roughness???? I mean come on, how are you going to judge what is and what is not too rough?? Don’t they train officials, don’t they get paid to make calls, is it not reviewed on film to see what is what??? All the people pointing fingers should be looking at, if so aggressive a hit is made, WHY NO FLAG??? Are officials getting paid???

  74. expertop says: Mar 6, 2012 4:07 PM

    @ mikemcdorman

    It’s you who is confused. The scandal isn’t about the legality or the illegality of “hits”. Whether or not a penalty was called for a certain play is irrelevant to the issues at hand. Pay-for-performance is a violation of NFL rules. It violates the CBA. And it is the pooling of money with the specific purpose of paying a player who inflicts injury on another player that is reprehensible here. Yeah, you can get your nose broken playing the game. That’s one thing. It’s another thing entirely getting your nose broken because the other team has a pool going to see who can collect the money by breaking your nose. And what is alarming Roger Goodell.

  75. mikemcdorman says: Mar 6, 2012 6:08 PM

    @expertop

    I disagree.

    Pay-for-performance isn’t against the rules per se (as far as I understand). What’s against the rules is setting a bounty on someone in the sense of paying to see them injured with malicious intent, or at least the intent to collect the bounty.

    But that’s not what happened.

    What took place was a program in which guys were rewarded for any number of big defensive plays (interceptions, caused fumbles, touchdowns, tackles inside the 20, etc.) including big LEGAL hits, where, if the hit was hard enough to ring a guy’s bell or otherwise put him out of the game, then a certain amount was added.

    The fact that the hits were required to go unpenalized is the key point — and that’s what makes it just like a boxing manager paying a fighter a bonus to win by K.O. instead of T.K.O.

    I’m not defending the idea that illegal hits — or illegal intents — should have been rewarded. IF they were, then yes, Goodell should bring down the hammer.

    But I see absolutely no problem with players rewarding other players — even with the OK from the coaching staff — for making big defensive plays, big hits, and thus bell-ringers, etc. included.

  76. ernestbynershands says: Mar 6, 2012 10:15 PM

    Hopefully GODell will suspend Fujita. Between a major suspension and Fujita’s injuries, that should put him out for the season. Unfortunately GODell will have to share this performance incentive with whoever puts Fujita out the rest of the games.
    This goes on in every team’s defensive unit. It goes on in the pros and in NCAA. This is nothing new. This won’t stop it.
    Just like Spygate, the perps will have to improve their tactics.
    Just another offseason PR victory for the NFL. Favre, Favre, Favre, Lockout, Peyton and Bountygate are all off season marketing campaigns by the NFL to keep the buzz.

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