Skip to content

Special Monday 10-pack: Winners and losers in free agency

628x471 Getty Images

Only six days ago, the free-agent market opened.  One of the biggest classes of veteran players, with some of the biggest names, landed on the market.

Apart from the Peyton chase, much of the dust has settled.

And so now we’re required by the laws of football analysis to tell you who won and who lost, even though we won’t really know the answer until they start playing games.

Which, you know, will feature winners and losers.

1. Winner:  Eagles.

Last year, with a compressed offseason and a new defensive coordinator who had been an offensive line coach for 14 prior seasons, the Eagles foolishly embarked on a spending spree, bringing in a bunch of big-name players and setting the stage for a Wonderlic pick-sixer blurting out the dreaded “Dream Team” label.

Apart from the challenge of getting a bunch of new employees on the same page quickly, the move surely caused some of the men already under contract to wonder why they weren’t getting a share of the free-agency windfall.

This year, the Eagles have focused on taking care of their own, which is a much better way to ensure that a true spirit of team will take over the locker room.

Perhaps most importantly, the Eagles have set the stage for receiver DeSean Jackson to turn back the clock to 2009, when he wasn’t concerned about staying healthy and/or getting paid.  The Eagles have addressed those concerns via a long-term deal that, in comparison to some of the too-heavy contracts given to lesser receivers and in light of Jackson’s rocky recent history, looks like a win-win.

Maybe that means “win” will be a more common term in the term’s vocabulary this season.

2.  Winner:  Packers.

G.M. Ted Thompson rarely makes a big splash in free agency.  The biggest exception came in 2006, when at the very public urging of quarterback Brett Favre the team signed cornerback Charles Woodson.

Other than that, the Packers under Thompson take a very conservative approach, building through the draft and using free agency on a limited basis, with low-cost talent addressing specific needs.

It’s not sexy this time of year.  But this isn’t the time of year when championships are won.  Unlike downtrodden organizations (such as the Packers themselves in 1993, when Reggie White chose Green Bay from a long list of suitors), the Packers don’t need to do anything to fire up the fan base or breathe life into the franchise.

It’s the right approach for this specific team.  The Packers have won, once again, by doing nothing.

3.  Winner:  Bills.

Speaking of downtrodden organizations, no team needed a big-ticket free agent like Mario Williams more than the Bills.  And they went all in, pulling out all the stops and persuading Williams to spend two nights in town and eventually getting the job done.

It gives Buffalo and the Bills a major boost, igniting intense local interest and legitimate national attention.  It also makes good football sense; defensive coordinator Dave Wannstedt now has a player around whom the team’s new 4-3 defense can be built.

It wasn’t cheap, and it may prove to be a mistake.  But it was a risk the Bills needed to make if they ever hope to become relevant again.

4.  Winner:  Patriots.

At first, it looked like the Pats would follow the Pack’s “closed for business” approach to the early days of free agency.  But with needs at receiver, they’ve added a player in Brandon Lloyd who’ll have a far bigger impact than Chad Ochocinco (then again, the bar is low), and they’ve given Wes Welker a little cause for concern by landing a candidate to play slot receiver in Anthony Gonzalez.

They’ve also addressed an area of need on defense, adding the once-promising Trevor Scott to the rotation of recently underachieving pass rushers.

The Pats could still use a true deep threat to clear out all the underneath traffic.  But even if Lloyd is the biggest addition, the team that nearly won the Super Bowl in 2011 will be contending again in 2012.

5.  Winner:  Chiefs.

Yes, they were denied admission to the Peyton chase.  But let’s not forget that, despite all the dysfunction and key injuries of 2011, the Chiefs weren’t far away from winning the weakest division in the NFL.

Unlike most teams, the Chiefs found bargains even before the market softened, adding running back Peyton Hillis to a one-year, fire-under-butt-lighting $2.6 million contract, tight end Kevin Boss for three years and $9 million, right tackle Eric Winston, and backup quarterback Brady Quinn.

Hillis and Quinn played for offensive coordinator Brian Daboll in Cleveland, adding some familiarity to the new Romeo Crennel regime.  Winston addresses a key area of need, and Boss gives the Chiefs a second pass-catching tight end, which apparently is now a mandatory requirement for any team that hopes to be highly successful in the passing game.

Next up, don’t be surprised if Crennel lures another former Brown to Kansas City, with linebacker Kamerion Wimbley on the market.

6.  Loser:  Dolphins.

Peter King of SI.com chronicles a decade of bizarre personnel moves by the Dolphins, but the organization is now developing another troubling reputation:  anyone with options won’t opt for Miami.

It began last year with owner Stephen Ross clumsily pursuing coach Jim Harbaugh, which painted a vivid picture of disloyalty to coach Tony Sparano.  It continued in 2012 when Ross tried, and failed, to lure coach Jeff Fisher to town.  And it spread to the ranks of players in 2012, with Peyton Manning showing tepid interest at best in joining the team (even though some believed it was a done deal that he’d be a Dolphin).  Then, Matt Flynn’s decision to play for the Seahawks instead of former Packers coordinator/Dolphins head coach Joe Philbin did more than raise eyebrows — especially when followed by Steelers safety Ryan Clark proclaiming that “no one” wants to play for the Dolphins.

It’s possible that Philbin simply wasn’t all that interested in Flynn, and that Philbin knows  Flynn’s pair of high-end performances (one in 2010 and one in 2011) won’t translate to being an effective week-in, week-out starter, once opposing defenses have a chance to study enough of his film and figure him out.  If that’s the case, the Dolphins shouldn’t have even brought him to town for a visit.  By doing so, it creates the impression that they wanted him — and that yet again they failed to get their man.

Correct or not, there’s now a perception that no one of significant consequence wants to work for the Dolphins.  And the harder Ross tries to turn the page by making a “big splash,” the more likely it is that he’ll continue to swing the bat and hit himself in the face with it.

7.  Loser:  Saints.

With Bountygate lingering, the Saints had even more reason to work out a new, long-term deal with Drew Brees.  And yet the Saints continue to fail to find a middle ground with their franchise quarterback.

There’s a chance Brees simply wants too much.  But here’s the problem:  He deserves it.  The best NFL quarterback of the last six years, if he wants to max out his contract, then he should.

And as to the idea that he needs to leave some money behind so that the Saints can field a competitive team given the salary cap, here’s one important point:  It never stopped the Colts from being competitive when Peyton got every last dollar he could.

And while it’s good that the Saints kept receiver Marques Colston, they lost Robert Meachem.  And while it’s good that they lured Ben Grubbs away from Baltimore, the lost Carl Nicks.

More importantly, they’ve yet to do anything to address needs on defense, which could become even more significant once the suspensions come down.

8.  Loser:  Vikings.

Good teams can afford to sit on the sidelines in the early days of free agency.  The Vikings are not a good team.

With plenty of cap room and a tenuous stadium situation and a fan base that may choose to do things other than attend or watch Vikings games this season, the franchise needed to make a splash.  Not a Mario Williams cannonball; but something more significant than a John Carlson dog paddle.

It’s doesn’t mean the Vikings should go hog wild.  But they should have made it a priority to land one big-name player, even if it meant overpaying a little.

The offseason is about selling hope.  Teams like the Packers, Patriots, Giants, and Steelers can afford to do nothing in March; the hope is implied.  For teams that have fallen, March is an opportunity to prove that they’re at least trying to get up.

9.  Loser:  Ravens.

The Ravens had four players in the PFT Hot 100 free-agency list.  Three already have bolted for greener pastures:  defensive end Cory Redding, linebacker Jarret Johnson, and guard Ben Grubbs.

To make matters worse, guard Evan Mathis opted to stay with the Dream Team in lieu of joining a team that, on paper, seems to have a better chance of making its dreams come true.

Then there’s the lingering possibility that someone will make restricted free agent cornerback Lardarius Webb an offer the Ravens can’t afford to match.

Though there’s a long way to go before September, it’s hard not to think that, at least for now, the Ravens have faded a bit closer to the pack in the AFC.

10.  Loser:  Bengals.

By capping 2011 with an unlikely playoff berth, it can’t be said that Paul Brown Stadium routinely was less than full due to the fact that the team was bad.  Instead, the fan base is fed up with owner Mike Brown.

Even though the team is laying a solid foundation of youthful players, Bengals fans think it’s not because of Brown but in spite of him.  And with a huge cap surplus for 2012, the Bengals haven’t done much to persuade anyone that they’re willing to spend.

The good news is that, after several days of inaction, the Bengals have gone bargain shopping, adding offensive lineman Travelle Wharton and defensive back Jason Allen.  They also managed to keep free-agent safety Reggie Nelson, who had attracted an offer from the Jets.

But this is the one playoff team that needed to at least chase a marquee free agent.  They didn’t have to land the guy.  Mike Brown simply needed to show that he’s willing to move from the nickel slot machines over to the no-limit poker table.

The Bengals may once again be competitive in 2012.  The fans won’t embrace the franchise they way they should, however, until they see large chunks of their money being reinvested in players who can help the team compete for a championship.

11.  Loser/Winner:  Redskins.

I know.  I said there would be only 10 winners and losers.  But I didn’t say anything about the team that lands in both categories.

The $36 million in unexpected cap charges for treated the uncapped year too literally makes the Redskins losers.  Their refusal to shrug their shoulders when they did nothing wrong makes them winners.

Their ability to still find a way to spend money makes them winners.  Their decision to give so much money to the likes of Pierre Garçon and Josh Morgan makes them losers.

Their willingness to move up to No. 2 and get the franchise’s first true franchise quarterback since Sammy Baugh possibly will make them winners.  Mortgaging the future by giving up three first-round draft picks and a second-round pick possibly will make them losers.

Permalink 130 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Baltimore Ravens, Buffalo Bills, Cincinnati Bengals, Features, Green Bay Packers, Kansas City Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, Minnesota Vikings, New England Patriots, New Orleans Saints, Philadelphia Eagles, Rumor Mill, Top Stories, Washington Redskins

Brian Cushing lands on PUP list

Brian Cushing AP

Texans linebacker Brian Cushing knows that he’ll be ready for Week One and now we all know that he won’t be ready for the first training camp practice.

Cushing has been cleared by doctors after rehabbing the knee and leg injuries that ended his 2013 season, but the team isn’t quite ready to let him be a full participant in practice just yet. Cushing has been placed on the Physically Unable to Perform list ahead of the start of camp, which means he’s barred from doing more than working out on the side as the team goes through its paces.

Like all players on the list, Cushing counts against the 90-man roster and can be activated at any time. Once he is activated, however, Cushing will lose eligibility for the regular season PUP list.

The Texans also placed linebacker Trevardo Williams and rookie defensive tackle Louis Nix on the PUP list. Williams spent last season on injured reserve with a knee injury and Nix, a third-round pick in May, missed some time this spring with a knee ailment of his own.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Quentin Groves worked out for Jets

Cleveland Browns v Green Bay Packers Getty Images

The Jets think they are good enough to make the playoffs, but that’s not stopping them from checking out ways to improve the roster before the start of the season.

Ian Rapoport of NFL Network reports that the team worked out veteran linebacker Quentin Groves on Monday. Groves was cut by the Browns last month after contributing two sacks in five games with the team last year.

The Jets are set in the starting lineup at outside linebacker with Calvin Pace and Quinton Coples, but they are short on experienced depth at the position. Groves has played 84 games over the last six seasons, which certainly qualifies as the kind of seasoning that the Jets don’t currently have on the lower rungs of the depth chart. If he signed with the Jets, he’d also likely see time on special teams during the 2014 season.

Groves has also worked out for the Titans, Redskins and Patriots since parting ways with the Browns and it would seem likely that he’ll land somewhere in time to compete for a job in training camp.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Tuesday morning one-liners

Pittsburgh Steelers v Cleveland Browns Getty Images

WR Sammy Watkins was a hit on the second day of Bills camp.

Dolphins DE Cameron Wake checks out Wembley Stadium in London.

Injury issues to watch with the Patriots.

What will Jets DE Sheldon Richardson do in his second NFL season?

The Ravens have selected a new anthem singer for home games.

Said Bengals offensive coordinator Hue Jackson, “I know this. You can’t be complacent. There has to be a fire in you. Hopefully with our players it’s the right kind of fire, not one you have to put out. The past is the past. It’s about a different future. Not for myself but for this offensive football team.”

The Browns will need big things from TE Jordan Cameron this season.

Steelers WR Lance Moore is getting used to all the hills in Pittsburgh.

It’s not surprising that the Texans were 2-14 last year after watching them cut ties with a second 2013 third-round pick.

Colts LB Daniel Adongo’s unusual journey to the NFL is about to turn into a second season.

One last look at the Jaguars offseason before training camp begins.

What should we expect from the Titans defensive line this season.

S Eric Hagg has decided to retire from the Broncos.

TE Travis Kelce is eager to start contributing to the Chiefs offense.

Jim Plunkett and Marcus Allen have different opinions on where the Raiders should play.

Chargers president Dean Spanos is excited to start the season on Monday Night Football.

Has building a strong offensive line hurt the Cowboys?

Not every son-in-law gets to hear things as nice from their wife’s father as what former Giants G Chris Snee heard on Monday.

Looking for progress from the Eagles defense.

The Redskins added TE Mike Caussin to their roster.

S Chris Conte is confident he still has a future on the Bears defense.

The Lions unveiled the patch they’ll wear to honor the late William Clay Ford.

Keeping QB Aaron Rodgers upright makes everything else go for the Packers offense.

Offensive coordinator Norv Turner shares some thoughts about how the Vikings will move the ball this season.

Julio Jones’s return from injury is one thing to watch at wide receiver with the Falcons.

Panthers S Roman Harper bought a new pad in New Orleans.

Saints DT John Jenkins is starting camp on the PUP list.

Five Buccaneers position battles to keep an eye on this summer.

Optimism and questions at linebacker accompany the Cardinals to training camp.

The Rams rookies kicked off their training camp on Monday.

Finding a stand-in for LB NaVorro Bowman will be a key part of 49ers camp.

Two Seahawks fans want to erect a statue of the final play of last season’s NFC Championship Game.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Cowboys choose to run together in the heat

Justin Durant,  Bruce Carter AP

The Cowboys had the option of running in the oppressive heat of Texas, or waiting until they hit the milder temps of California for training camp.

Most of them chose Texas.

According to David Moore of the Dallas Morning News, around 75 players performed their conditioning tests Monday at Valley Ranch, rather than waiting until they reported to Oxnard later this week.

The test — a series of 20 sprints with prescribed times by position group — were overseen by team captains, who relayed results to coaches. Linebacker Justin Durant tweeted out word that “everybody passed,” which is a good sign.

Of course, the high participation in a more demanding climate might also be read as a positive, for a team that has cruised to an 8-8 record each of the last three seasons.

 

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

David Nelson actually believes the Jets are a playoff team

Brent Grimes, David Nelson AP

Rex Ryan’s confidence is apparently contagious.

Wide receiver David Nelson has caught it, saying that for the first time he’s convinced the Jets will make the playoffs.

“For the first time in my career, I can say it with conviction and say it with belief: this is a playoff team,” Nelson said, via Seth Walder of the New York Daily News.

“Going 8-8 with the team that we had last year, the youth that we had, the inexperience. The way we finished the season last year showed us that we had potential. The teams that we beat showed us we were capable.”

Asked if that meant they were a Super Bowl team (pushy New York media), Nelson replied: “That’s the beautiful thing about the playoffs: Anything can happen. So I’ll answer that again in [November]  when we hopefully clinch a playoff spot.”

Of course, that’s all easier to say than do. The Jets haven’t made the playoffs since 2010.

Then again, they’re the Jets, so the saying is part of the charm, even if it takes them a few years to actually believe the words flying out of their mouths.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Lawyers want their conversations with Hernandez not broadcast

Hernandez AP

The arguments advanced by the Aaron Hernandez legal team now include an attempt to keep secret the in-court discussion of their arguments.

According to the Associated Press, Hernandez’s lawyers filed paperwork on Monday asking the Bristol Superior Court to rule that private conversations between Hernandez and the lawyers not be included in the online broadcast of hearings.  The lawyers contend that the images violate the rules established for the electronic recording of courtroom proceedings.

“[P]rompt action” is requested.  Which makes sense, given that Hernandez will be back in court on Tuesday for a status hearing in the Odin Lloyd murder case.  Hernandez’s lawyers recently asked that the trial in the case be delayed from early October to early January.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Dareus appears in court, agrees to substance abuse treatment

Marcell Dareus AP

Bills defensive tackle Marcell Dareus was absent from training camp on Monday while he appeared in an Alabama courtroom, where he told a judge he will agree to substance abuse treatment.

Dareus was arrested and charged with possession of a controlled substance in Alabama on May 5, and his lawyer told the Associated Press on Monday that Dareus agreeing to enter the NFL’s substance-abuse program may allow him to have those felony drug charges dismissed.

The drug possession charge was not Dareus’s only legal problem this offseason: He also was charged with reckless endangerment after an incident in which he crashed his car into a tree following an alleged drag race with teammate Jerry Hughes. Dareus has a September 9 court date in that case.

On the field, Dareus is missing practice until he can pass the team’s conditioning test, which he failed on his first attempt on Saturday.

Dareus could be facing league discipline, either under the substance-abuse policy for the drug possession arrest or the personal-conduct policy for the reckless endangerment arrest, but there has been no word from the league office about any fine or suspension.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

No 2011 draft picks expected to hold out from training camp

Watt Getty Images

When the rookie wage scale grossly restricted the money earned by players taken at the top of the 2011 draft, a theory emerged that once players became eligible for new contracts after their third NFL seasons, plenty of the men who became quality players would hold out until receiving the money they didn’t get upon entering the league in order to prevent busts from being unduly overpaid.

So far, that theory has busted.  No members of the 2011 draft class are poised to hold out, even though none of the first-round picks has received a second contract.

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, a fifth-round pick that year, has gotten a massive payday.  But he’s the rare exception.  First-rounders like Cam Newton, A.J. Green, Patrick Peterson, Julio Jones, Tyron Smith, and J.J. Watt (pictured) are waiting — and they’re waiting very patiently.

In fact, only one 2011 draft pick has taken a stand this offseason.  Chiefs linebacker Justin Houston boycotted the offseason program and a mandatory minicamp.  He’s still expected to report this week for Chiefs’ training camp, especially since he is only a season away from free agency, unlike the first-rounders whose hands are tied by the fifth-year option.

The situation will further bolster the idea that the NFL won big in the last CBA, even though the truth remains that the NFLPA got the best deal it could given a rank-and-file that didn’t want to miss a paycheck.  As a result, the paychecks will continue to smaller for for all rookies drafted from 2011 through the end of the decade, whether superstar or half-a-star.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Pettine says Browns aren’t inclined to cut Josh Gordon

Josh Gordon AP

The Browns might not have wide receiver Josh Gordon for part or all of the 2014 season, but that doesn’t mean the club will be severing his employment.

Head coach Mike Pettine told the Akron Beacon Journal the club doesn’t intend to release Gordon, who was arrested on a DWI charge in early July. The 23-year-old Pro Bowl wide receiver, under contract for two more seasons, was already facing a potential suspension under the NFL’s substance abuse policy.

“Josh is a Cleveland Brown. We want to do what’s best for him,” Pettine told the Beacon Journal‘s Nate Ulrich in a story published Monday. “We have a player that potentially needs help. Whether it’s him or whether it’s anybody else that wears the uniform, if we can help, we’ll help. We want to make our decisions always, what’s best for the player, and you try to marry it with what’s best for the team.

“So that’s why I don’t think that cutting him, while it may have worked for some other people, I don’t know if that’s necessarily the best option here. It might be the worst option for both — for us and for him. We’re going to wait and see what happens and then act accordingly.”

Pettine told the Beacon Journal the club expects some clarity on Gordon’s disciplinary status in the next two weeks. The wide receiver reportedly could be in line for a yearlong ban.

“I’ve heard everything, all the possibilities, so it’s just gotten to the point where it is what it is. We’ve planned for everything, and we’re ready to go,” the Browns’ head coach told the newspaper.

In the short term, the Browns would count on Andrew Hawkins, Miles Austin, Nate Burleson and Travis Benjamin, among others, to pick up the slack if Gordon were ruled out for an extended stretch.

In the longer term, though, an ideal Cleveland offense would have Gordon as the go-to target for a clear-cut starting quarterback. But those are just hopes for now.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Pettine: Browns to name starting QB by third preseason game

Johnny Manziel AP

Johnny Manziel or Brian Hoyer?

According to coach Mike Pettine, we’ll have a winner of the Browns’ QB derby in about a month.

In a Q&A published Monday, Pettine told the Akron Beacon Journal the club will pick a starting quarterback by Cleveland’s August 23 preseason game vs. St. Louis.

“I don’t know if I’ll set a date and kind of paint ourselves into a date, but it will be sooner than the third preseason game,” Pettine told Nate Ulrich of the Beacon Journal.

Teams typically play their starters more in the third exhibition game than in any of the other preseason contests, so if the Browns stick to the plan, the No. 1 quarterback will get an extended stint with the first-team offense in an important dress rehearsal for Cleveland.

Hoyer, a sixth-year pro who attended high school in Cleveland, will try to hold off the rookie Manziel, a first-round pick and the 2012 Heisman Trophy winner.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Marvin Jones tweaked ankle working out with Andy Dalton

Marvin Getty Images

The Bengals’ list of players on the non-football injury list surprisingly included receiver Marvin Jones, with an ankle injury.

Per a league source, Jones is day-to-day due to a tweaking of the ankle that happened at the post-OTA passing camp arranged by quarterback Andy Dalton.  Jones had an issue with the ankle in 2013.

It’s a minor injury, and Jones currently is expected to practice this week.  Which is great news for the Bengals, especially in light of the significant potential that Jones flashed at times in 2013 as a complement to A.J. Green.

Permalink 0 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Sammy Watkins gives Bills a mild scare

Watkins AP

Teams that play in the Hall of Fame game get to open camp a week or so earlier than most other teams.  Which gives the teams that play in the Hall of Fame game extra practice time.

Which, when coming before other teams have opened camp, makes those teams the center of media attention.  Which, when one of their hottest young players gets injured, sets Twitter ablaze.

On Monday, Bills rookie receiver Sammy Watkins, based on simultaneous tweets from roughly a dozen or more media accounts, caught a ball in traffic and emerged with an injury.  Some said he was dazed.  Others said he appeared to have a cut on his forehead or eye.

After practice, coach Doug Marrone told reporters that Watkins had been poked in the eye.  It’s one of the risks of football practice, especially when a guy is willing to go over the middle.

“He shows that,” Marrone said regarding Watkins’ fearlessness.  “He’s made a very good career for himself, in college, being able to go over the middle. That’s always a big test when you get to this level to make sure you can come over the middle.  He’s a fearless player and, again, at the same time you have to be smart when you do that.”

Luck is also a factor.  On Monday, Watkins and the Bills got lucky.

Permalink 2 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Seahawks have 99-percent season-ticket renewal rate

SeahawksFan12 Getty Images

It’s good to be the defending NFL champions.

The Seattle Seahawks have announced that all tickets for the 2014 regular season have been sold, thanks in large part to a franchise-record 99-percent renewal rate on season tickets.

The team capped season tickets at 63,000.  Another 12,000 members of the 12th man have joined the Blue Pride season-ticket waiting list.

It’s hardly a surprise, given the passion of the fan base, the performance of the team in 2013, and the potential for the Seahawks to become the first team in a decade to win back-to-back Super Bowl crowns.

Permalink 8 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Giants sign guard John Sullen

Auburn v Mississippi State Getty Images

With stalwart guard Chris Snee electing to retire, the Giants added to their numbers at the position on Monday, signing John Sullen, a first-year pro from Auburn. The signing of Sullen was disclosed in the NFL’s daily personnel notice.

Sullen (6-6, 340) signed with the Bengals after the 2013 NFL Draft. He appeared in three preseason games with Cincinnati before being waived on August 31.

Sullen will take the roster spot of the 32-year-old Snee, who officially was released with a failed physical designation. The 11th-year guard has hip and elbow injuries.

In another roster move Monday, the Giants waived wide receiver Kris Adams from the reserve/physically unable to perform list after he failed a physical. Adams suffered a broken leg last year.

Permalink 2 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Favre denies he’s worried about getting booed at Lambeau Field

Favre Getty Images

Packers President and CEO Mark Murphy said recently that Brett Favre has not committed to a jersey retirement ceremony at Lambeau Field in part because “He wouldn’t want to come back to be booed.” But Favre says that’s not the case.

“I’ve heard that was a concern of mine, and I’m here to tell you I’m not,” Favre said on ESPN 1000. “I’m not worried about that. I’m well aware that you can’t please everyone. Not everyone’s going to like you regardless, and you know what, so be it. But I think the 16 years that I had in Green Bay speaks for itself.”

Favre was booed off the field the last time he played at Lambeau with the Vikings, but he thinks he’d be cheered if he returned to have his green and gold No. 4 jersey retired.

“I have played with other teams, but I will be remembered as a Packer,” Favre said. “I feel that. I think the true Packer backers, which there are tons out there, feel the same way. I’m not the first player to play for other teams or rivals. . . . As time goes by, that’s how I will be remembered, as a Packer, and that’s how I want to be remembered.”

Favre believes that most Packers fans remember him fondly, even if they didn’t much like the way he left.

Permalink 28 Comments Feed for comments Back to top