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Barber says Wonderlic test doesn’t matter

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Long-time Buccaneers cornerback Ronde Barber echoed on Wednesday something many have said since LSU cornerback Morris Claiborne’s score on the Wonderlic test surfaced on Tuesday:  The 50-question general intelligence test is irrelevant to on-field ability.

I don’t think it’s a factor,” Barber tells NFL.com.  “I don’t think it really translates into the football IQ . . .  I wouldn’t pay much attention to it.”

So why then does the NFL continue to administer the test?  Former Cowboys and Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson said Tuesday via Twitter that “90% of my misses were because I took a chance on marginal intelligence.”

Others, like Ravens director of player personnel Eric DeCosta, believe it’s not a major factor.  “We do look at it.  Obviously, the body of work . . .  the tape, how the guy plays is the most important thing,” DeCosta told NFL.com.

Still, the time perhaps has come for the NFL to come up with a different way to assess intelligence.  The Wonderlic test assesses vocabulary skills, reading comprehension, math skills, and spatial relationships.  The fact that the test creates an apples-to-apples number that, when that number is either really high or really low, finds its way into the media (just like supposedly pending steroids appeals and other confidential information) means that the time has come for the NFL to come up with a better, more secure way to define and to determine intelligence.

Until that happens, the onus continues to fall on the agent to prepare clients for the test, to ensure that the clients will take the test as seriously as the 40-yard dash, and to take action when there is reason to believe that a player may generate an incredibly low score.  If, as in Claiborne’s case, the player has a learning disability, the agent needs to be proactive, raising the issue with the NFL, seeking an accommodation, and ultimately instructing the client not to take the test.

Instead, agent Bus Cook apparently had no idea that Claiborne has a learning disability.  It suggests that Cook undertook no effort to prepare Claiborne for the Wonderlic test.

And that shouldn’t be much of a surprise.  Cook had an indirect hand in the representation of the last high-profile single-digit Wonderlic score, Vince Young, who initially generated a six on the Wonderlic six years ago.

But while the agents need to take steps to prepare and, if necessary, protect their clients from the Wonderlic test, the agents shouldn’t have to.  The NFL should realize that the Wonderlic has become more trouble than it’s ever been worth, and the league (or maybe the teams) should come up with a non-standardized method for spotting players who truly have, as Jimmy Johnson described it, marginal intelligence.

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101 Responses to “Barber says Wonderlic test doesn’t matter”
  1. steelerhypocrite says: Apr 4, 2012 2:28 PM

    In Claiborne’s defense, the first 46 questions were “Who’s your daddy?”

  2. benh999 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:29 PM

    It’s not that smart people usually make good players, it’s that stupid people usually make bad ones. The difference between a 20 and a 45 does not matter. The difference between a five and a 20 is a big deal though.

  3. fcmlefty1 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:33 PM

    There are three positions on the field where you need to quickly and efficiently process information and communicate it: QB, C (line calls) and LB (setting the defense). I’d say the Wonderlic score can’t simply be dismissed for those three positions (but it also isn’t the be all, end all), but probably carries very little weight for the other positions on the field.

  4. thraiderskin says: Apr 4, 2012 2:34 PM

    Well atleast we all got to laugh at the young man with the learning disability. (if what you are saying is he has one) I’m actually wondering how Bus Cook is even an agent at this point, its shameful for him to let his top 10, maybe top 5 pick get lambasted NATIONALLY.

  5. noross says: Apr 4, 2012 2:34 PM

    ” Former Cowboys and Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson said Tuesday via Twitter that “90% of my misses were because I took a chance on marginal intelligence.”

    Speaking of people with “marginal intelligence”.

  6. blutri10 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:34 PM

    Ronde should know…just look at his brother. Did many dumb things in life but was a great player.

    And that’s coming from a Giants fan.

  7. milkmandanimal says: Apr 4, 2012 2:34 PM

    You know, it’s not like this guy is some marginal talent who might go in the 7th round if he’s lucky. He’s the consensus top defensive player on the board, and he’s probably going in the top 5-6 picks. He’s really high-profile, and anything he does is going to be scrutinized heavily by the media.

    Can somebody explain to me exactly how an agent doesn’t sit him down and give him a couple sample Wonderlics before the combine? Maybe just one? I mean, this guy should be a really big deal to you, and does it not make sense to spend a couple minutes running through the stupid test?

  8. jessefootball says: Apr 4, 2012 2:35 PM

    I saw some old Wonderlic tests and was surprised the questions weren’t harder.

    Feel bad for Claiborne, though. This kind of thing you never live down.

  9. whitecastleisafoodgroup says: Apr 4, 2012 2:35 PM

    Some day I’d like to see what owners and GM’s would score.

  10. rc33 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:36 PM

    For the most part I’d agree with Barber.
    But I’d definitely prefer having my QB put up a high score.

  11. eaglesnoles05 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:36 PM

    Lol man, i had my “pot-calling-kettle-black, YOU don’t matter, Tiki” post ready to roll upon seeing this headline. But, alas, it’s the Barber that matters who said it, so no go.

  12. erod22 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:36 PM

    For a man-on-man corner or a pass rusher….no.

    For a QB, you bet it does. And it helps to have offensive lineman and receivers that can adjust to looks at the line of scrimmage, too. Not to mention LBs and safeties who do a lot of pre-snap adjusting as well.

  13. chawk12thman says: Apr 4, 2012 2:37 PM

    Football instincts and football intelligence at the position the player plays would be my concern. If he can’t do alegebra that’s too bad, but what does that specifically have to do with the team’s goal of putting a winning team together? If I was a GM I would take a “marginally intelligent” and highly talented player over the very smart but average player. Wouldn’t you?

  14. bunjy96 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:37 PM

    Barber is right!

  15. i10east says: Apr 4, 2012 2:37 PM

    Tiki is flabbergasted…..

  16. ken0west says: Apr 4, 2012 2:40 PM

    The test does matter, because anyone who spends a half a day of preparation can score in double digits (anyone who actually went to class in college (or middle school) can easily get over 40, when drunk.)

    If a player does not spend the few hours required to not look like a fool why should a NFL team expect them to put in the work required to excel in the NFL? I view any single digit Woderlic score the same way as a failed drug test at the combine.

  17. cubano76 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:40 PM

    Unless a team is asking this kid to perform brain surgery, or find a cure for cancer. Who gives a damn. They have smarter people for that. I bet those genius in suits can’t break on a 5 yard out and take it to the house!

  18. theytukrjobs says: Apr 4, 2012 2:40 PM

    So why exactly should the NFL get rid of this? Because the scores get leaked sometimes and it is embarrassing for people to know you scored low?

    These players aren’t required to take the test. Fans are curious what they score. Let the NFL administer the test and if a guy is embarrassed by how low he did on a practice test he can just skip it. Sure, people will know he’s likely no genius, but that is much less embarrassing than getting a 4.

    If you were to guess on every question you’d likely score a 10 on average. So getting a 4 means he didn’t finish the test and/or is really bad at guessing answers.

  19. dcviking says: Apr 4, 2012 2:41 PM

    Tiki also believes that

    1. marriage vows don’t matter either
    2. Tom Coughlin is losing the Giants
    3. He should believe on an NFL roster

  20. huskersrock1 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:41 PM

    That is all good and dandy; however the question I have is how he graduated from LSU if he can’t read?

  21. shaunypoo says: Apr 4, 2012 2:43 PM

    The closer the comparison is to another player, the more important all of these measurables become. If you think this player is a level above another player than the Wonderlic is not important. If you are looking at two players in the same position with extremely close physical measurables and similar game tapes, then maybe the Wonderlic is something to factor into the equation.

    It may be old and obsolete in your opinion, but the NFL, as an employer, has a right to use whatever testing it wants to determine whether or not a player is able to get the job done.

    If a player wants to refuse to do something at the combine, it is his right. It won’t make any difference to a first round pick. But if you are a borderline player, you don’t refuse to do anything a prospective employer is asking you to do. That says as much, if not more, about a player as any test can.

  22. eggersthejerk says: Apr 4, 2012 2:43 PM

    Barber is right ya know. Don’t believe me?
    Remember what Joe Theismann said about the subject:

    “Nobody in the game of football should be called a genius.
    A genius is somebody like Norman Einstein.”

  23. smacklayer says: Apr 4, 2012 2:43 PM

    I took the wonderlick for a job a few years back and I scored a 44. I am not even that smart (compared to a lot of people). I would say about half the questions were “super” easy – meaning you just instantly know the answer, like which is bigger 1/4 or 1/8. About 10-15 of the questions required you to either think a little or so some simple math to figure out. And the remaining 10 or so were fairly difficult and either required some writing out of algebra or such.

    The point being is that in my opinion, even the most dim-witted college grad should be able to pull at least 15-20 on it. If an adult can only score a 4 on this test, it means he either bombed the test on purpose, or has such low intelligence that it would be difficult for himi to function in the world. And if this were a high-level perspective employee I am hiring, this would be a giant red flag.

  24. mrbigass says: Apr 4, 2012 2:45 PM

    Begs the question that if this guy was not very bright, how did me manage to keep his grades up at school to stay eligible?

    This is a much deeper problem in that so many of these athletes are propped up in college with someone helping them so they can play and bring in big bucks for the school, but after they leave their ignorance is exposed to the world.

    How about the failure of the institution to actually teach these guys?

  25. bingocostello says: Apr 4, 2012 2:45 PM

    He expected a 2!

  26. KIR says: Apr 4, 2012 2:46 PM

    At LSU, the school reported annual football revenue of $69.4 million in 2009-10

    The most important question is how can a kid who is obviously illiterate get accepted into college and then pass enough classes to remain eligible for three years? This is why I laugh when you all are outraged that a kid accepted a few bucks from a college. The truth is the kid should never have been accepted in the first place! He’s not going to get an education……HE CAN’T READ!

  27. dexterismyhero says: Apr 4, 2012 2:48 PM

    Maybe the Agents & Coaches should have to take it also so the player can see what they scored?

  28. catquick says: Apr 4, 2012 2:49 PM

    The real question is how did this leak? They fine and suspend players at the drop of a hat, so find out who leaked it and fire them. No one needs to be embarrassed publicly about his lack of intellect, especially a young man who has a big future in front of him. He may have just not cared about it, thinking it’s all a crock of dung, and raced through it without even reading most of it. I’m sure he never thought there’d be these kinds of repercussions. As I understand it, he’s a top 5 pick right now. Should he suspiciously fall to the late 1st or even the 2nd round, I’d think he has a monster lawsuit against the NFL, and I hope he bleeds them as dry as they bleed players when they mess up.

  29. KIR says: Apr 4, 2012 2:49 PM

    I’m sorry, but, these colleges should be sued for educational fraud.

  30. vambomarble says: Apr 4, 2012 2:51 PM

    Who cares what players think? They are experts at playing… not assessing talent with ALL the tools available.

    Vince Young is proof that decision making in a test environment DOES matter whether it is taking the timed Wonderlic test or getting into a fight at a strip club.

    BottomLine? Bus Cook is a crappy agent with his head up his butt if didn’t know his client had a learning disability and allowed the test. In a way, Cook fail to protect his client’s interests.

  31. blacknole08 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:52 PM

    The Wonderlic does have some meaning but I think that too much is made of the final score. I have ADD myself. It’s tough to consistently pay attention at anything without the right meds, although ADD meds might cause a player to fail a drug test (Garrett Hartley took adderall to drive somewhere and ended up with like a 4 game suspension a couple years back).

    I think Brandon Spikes tested positive as well and had to serve a suspension. So it’s a genuine problem that people have.

  32. seatownballers says: Apr 4, 2012 2:52 PM

    Valid point though. Test doesn’t measure talent, athleticism, or instincts. Which are more valuable in the nfl

  33. razic3k says: Apr 4, 2012 2:53 PM

    Only dumb people think education does not matter. Even the dumb ones who managed to get degrees.

    There’s a difference between knowing stuff and being able to apply what you know to solve problems.

    A low wonderlic score like Vince Young probably means he doesn’t know how to assess the defense quickly in a game situation and will be more prone to mistakes.

  34. geo1113 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:53 PM

    “If he can’t do alegebra that’s too bad, but what does that specifically have to do with the team’s goal of putting a winning team together?”

    ——————

    You are right about putting together a winning team. The sad part is that you have people who were in college for 3 – 5 years and they can’t do things that should have been learned in 9th grade.

  35. kokomike says: Apr 4, 2012 2:53 PM

    Change the name of the test to iWonderlic. Grades will go up.

  36. kelly8791 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:53 PM

    I’ve taken the wonderlic, and if you get below a 10, either you are mentally handicapped or you can’t read. Seriously. Whatever that means in terms of football, I have no idea, but something is definitely wrong.

  37. erod22 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:55 PM

    Still, getting a 4 is unbelievable.

    A bag of hammers could get a 4.

  38. citizenstrange says: Apr 4, 2012 2:58 PM

    Former Cowboys and Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson said Tuesday via Twitter that “90% of my misses were because I took a chance on marginal intelligence.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If misses = girlfriends then me too!

  39. riderspantherssk says: Apr 4, 2012 2:58 PM

    Of course Ronde says intelligence doesn’t matter, he’s gotta have his twin brother’s back.

  40. fishfiletkray says: Apr 4, 2012 2:59 PM

    steelerhypocrite says: Apr 4, 2012 2:28 PM

    In Claiborne’s defense, the first 46 questions were “Who’s your daddy?”

    Real funny. You must be perfect. It’s real funny until you see how difficult life is growing up like a lot of these young men have and see first hand what some go through.

  41. razic3k says: Apr 4, 2012 2:59 PM

    To go with my previous comment, a player with a low wonderlic won’t do well in the classroom situations in the NFL when they are learning strategy, etc.

    Football is not just about going out there and beating each other up for the ball. I’m sorry, but, I won’t take a chance on a player with an extremely low wonderlic.

  42. bullcharger says: Apr 4, 2012 2:59 PM

    Football instincts and football intelligence at the position the player plays would be my concern. If he can’t do alegebra that’s too bad, but what does that specifically have to do with the team’s goal of putting a winning team together? If I was a GM I would take a “marginally intelligent” and highly talented player over the very smart but average player. Wouldn’t you?

    ———–

    How about a highly intellegent player who is also talented like Ronde Barber. That’s the best choice.

    The current NFL’s schemes and situational plays require intellegence. That’s why Belichick can take seemingly average players and take them to the Superbowl. Because they are smart and can run more complex offensive and defensive schemes and always make good decisions on the field.

    Vince Young was a super taleted guy with a low Wonderlic score and he imploded on one team and made the dumbest media comment ever on the next team. There’s more to it than his intellegence, but that is certainly part of it.

    Teams can win with all talented guys of average intellegence, but talent is harder to find then brains and it costs more too, so it’s a harder way to stay good year over year.

  43. otistaylor89 says: Apr 4, 2012 2:59 PM

    1st sign that Claiborne has issues – he hired Bus Cook as an agent coming out of college.

    Seriously, Claiborne should ask for that percentage back for the way Cook has served his client.

  44. curtainclosed says: Apr 4, 2012 3:06 PM

    Doesn’t really say much about the educators at LSU does it? Pretty pathetic. They should be ashamed of themselves for not doing their jobs to educate him. Blows my mind that some of these so called professional athletes can barely speak English (I’m looking at you Chris Johnson).

  45. somedayphilly says: Apr 4, 2012 3:07 PM

    Way to show your racist soul SteelerHypocrite! There won’t be a place in heaven for guys like you.

  46. cmstrick says: Apr 4, 2012 3:07 PM

    1) Instead of the Wonderlic, perhaps a test like the SAT – which determines how well a person learns, rather than what they already know – would be more appropriate. I think most NFL teams would agree that coachability is more important than true intelligence.

    2) College is meant to prepare young people for their chosen profession, whatever that profession is. It makes no more sense to expect a future footballer to know entomology than it does to expect an entomologist to be able to run a sub-4.5 forty.

  47. bullcharger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:08 PM

    I don’t see why Wonderlic scores have to be protected. All the other combine measurables are reported. We judge a player and call him weak or slow or skinny, but if you say he isn’t a genius it is offensive and hurts his brand? It doesn’t make sense to me.

    Players are submitting themselves for judgement in hopes to get a very public and high paying job. They shouldn’t expect privacy of their Wonderlic grade.

  48. jakek2 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:11 PM

    Claiborne must be a retard. Even if he is illiterate or has a learning disability, he’d only need one brain cell to answer “C” to every question to beat a “4”.

  49. CKL says: Apr 4, 2012 3:11 PM

    To me, what it measures is good decision making under pressure, so QB is the only one I would be concerned with as far as score. And it wouldn’t necessarily be a BIG concern, just something I would dig into further.

    Marginal intelligence means the player wouldn’t have a good score (unless they were prepped or cheated somehow) but I’m sure there are average intelligence level people who don’t test well on written, timed tests. Doesn’t mean they are stupid. They just may need to be taught differently.

  50. geniusesq says: Apr 4, 2012 3:13 PM

    The Wonderlic doesn’t matter. Need proof? I bet most of the unathletic dorks on this site could score pretty well on it.

  51. spinmovr says: Apr 4, 2012 3:14 PM

    The Wonderlic is flawed testing tool. A low score may or may not be an indicator of low intelligence. Same thing with a high score. If the results of a test can’t consistently tell you anything useful and can’t predict anything for you then why use it? A standard IQ test would be just useful as the Wonderlic at this point.

    Asking a player if they like hunting and then separately asking if they like hurting animals isn’t as clever as it seems. The information the tester is trying to access is more nuanced and fluid than what the Wonderlic allows. There are established, useful tests from psychologists, sociologists and other specialists that can determine if a guy is a sociopath, genius or slacker. Leaving it to football people –who saw Roethlisberger’s QB ability but ignored the “meathead” side of his personality– to come up with an intelligence test for football players doesn’t make sense.

  52. bullcharger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:14 PM

    But while the agents need to take steps to prepare and, if necessary, protect their clients from the Wonderlic test, the agents shouldn’t have to. The NFL should realize that the Wonderlic has become more trouble than it’s ever been worth, and the league (or maybe the teams) should come up with a non-standardized method for spotting players who truly have, as Jimmy Johnson described it, marginal intelligence.

    —————–

    People are judged by standardized tests from the time they start school until they get through University. SAT scores are incredibly important and people are judged on those scores and future opportunity depends on it. When a football player is trying to get a job that potentially pays millions of dollars it should suddenly become less judgemental and non-standardized so players feelings aren’t hurt? Gimme a break.

  53. voiceofrealism says: Apr 4, 2012 3:19 PM

    You don’t get a 4 because you can’t solve algebraic equations or determine spatial relationships. You get a 4 cuz you can’t process much of anything. It’s important for a team to know that a player can’t answer 10 to 15 easy questions correctly. It’s a good test for Qb’s and the like, but also for any player. He doesn’t need to get a 40, but he better get 15.

  54. seanx40 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:20 PM

    As kelly8791 said, if you score a 4 on a Wonderlic test is absurd. Either this player is totally illiterate, incredibly lazy and arrogant, or just plain stupid.

    But I think there is something to this. Football is not that complicated for most players. Find the guy carrying the ball, and hit him. Or stop him from getting it in the first place. But people with low intelligence might end making more stupid off field choices. How low do you think Pacman Jones, or Mikel Lenshoure scored?

  55. granadafan says: Apr 4, 2012 3:20 PM

    What does this say about that fraud of an institute of “higher” learning that is LSU? The NCAA needs to investigate them how they kept Claiborne from staying eligible.

  56. buckybadger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:23 PM

    They always make this into a bigger deal then it really is. Who cares what he scored? It is the media that makes a big deal out of it. No one would even remember what Young got if you didn’t keep bringing it up. You can bash the fact the score got out but PFT still reported on it.

  57. golonger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:26 PM

    The Wonderlic isn’t the end-all, be-all……..so, if one scores a 24 vs. a 29….who really cares……..but, if you score a 5, it is definitely telling!…which is why they do and should continue giving it!

  58. jgava19 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:26 PM

    Consider the sorce.

  59. bullcharger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:26 PM

    cmstrick says:Apr 4, 2012 3:07 PM

    1) Instead of the Wonderlic, perhaps a test like the SAT – which determines how well a person learns, rather than what they already know – would be more appropriate. I think most NFL teams would agree that coachability is more important than true intelligence.

    2) College is meant to prepare young people for their chosen profession, whatever that profession is. It makes no more sense to expect a future footballer to know entomology than it does to expect an entomologist to be able to run a sub-4.5 forty.

    ————-

    SATs have very similar questions to the Wonderlic. It would be no different.

    There isn’t a college degree in football nor do people have to graduate to get into the NFL. A team needs to assess a players general intellegence and that’s the point of the Wonderlic. Any person who was accepted to college should be able to get more than 20 on a wonderlic without any preparation so it shouldn’t be a big deal.

  60. missle48 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:28 PM

    A Concussion Free player !

    Here is one player least likely to get a concussion or lose valuable data simply because whatever brain is there has not retained any information at all and cannot become lost in a helmet to helmet collision.

    Missle48

  61. rexismybff says: Apr 4, 2012 3:28 PM

    Former Cowboys and Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson said Tuesday via Twitter that “90% of my misses were because I took a chance on marginal intelligence.”

    =============================

    Clearly Johnson was speaking about Jerry Jones.

  62. bucfansouthtampa says: Apr 4, 2012 3:29 PM

    Listen, what is being reported is that Claiborne has a learning disability and that he had tutors and teaching assistants in LSU. His DB coach is on the Bucs Staff and will more than likely be assisting in him with the playbook. He is a shutdown corner, and this issue with his test score is a great chip on his shoulder.

    Please take steelerhypocrite’s post down. It is really racist and doesnt deserve to be on this site.

  63. jtbndy says: Apr 4, 2012 3:31 PM

    If this guy was only able to answer 4 questions right, how the hell did he manage to meet university requirements for GPA and pass his college classes?

    If colleges are just going to let athletes skate by, they should just make a minor league not tied to anything but physical abilities. These kind of scores make a mockery of higher education.

  64. golonger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:31 PM

    buckybadger – unfortunately, Young still remembers because he is still a moron!….which is the point, not “who remembers”

  65. golonger says: Apr 4, 2012 3:33 PM

    dcviking – if a question appeared on the test such as – what is the difference between Ronde and Tiki Barber?….you would fail! LOL

  66. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 3:33 PM

    Mo has a new nickname. “Fo'”.

  67. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 3:34 PM

    Well, at least after this experience, Claiborne won’t have trouble adding two and two together.

  68. rcali says: Apr 4, 2012 3:39 PM

    So what if he scored a 4? How did he do while he was running around in his underwear during the combine?

  69. *Legion* says: Apr 4, 2012 3:40 PM

    spinmovr: “A standard IQ test would be just useful as the Wonderlic at this point.”

    You’re right. The point of the Wonderlic test is that it takes 12 minutes and not 2 hours.

  70. randomguy9999 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:42 PM

    What a lot of players don’t get is that it isn’t a measure of knowledge, its structured as an indicator of how good the player is at reasoning and association…

    And a player who has those skills is 10 times better at learning from reporting, film , and instruction than any guy with that mythical football IQ that hasn’t meant anything since freshman year…..

  71. myeaglescantwin says: Apr 4, 2012 3:43 PM

    well,, i have a reasonable answer that is unbiased as it gets..

    GO TO THE SAT TESTING.

    every single player needed to take the test before college and it is designed to show intelligence levels.

    but look at the previous flubbs on this test,, Jamarcus, Vince Young, ect.. how well did that work out for them..

    NFL schemes require intelligence,, theres no question about that. But i’d value game film over a paper test or a underwear track meet 100/100 times.

  72. bucnbutfan says: Apr 4, 2012 3:44 PM

    Tons of respect for Ronde Barber, sure he is right that it may not be so important to whether he can be a good football player or not. But the issue goes much farther than that, it also matters that if he is that stupid, can he stay out of trouble off the field. Getting areested for silly stuff and being a jerk in public can result in suspensions and other PR problems. Been there, done that in Tampa with Aquib Talib. We don’t need another one, thank you!

  73. TylerHills says: Apr 4, 2012 3:45 PM

    At least he edged out Jeff Ireland by 1 point.

  74. rajbais says: Apr 4, 2012 3:47 PM

    Slash the Wonderlic!!!!!

    For God’s Sake, Tim Tebow reportedly got a 22 and his was 2 points below the QB average!!!!!! If he can suck at it everyone can because he’s like “The Girl Next Door” … just perfect!!!!!

    Plus, they’re only showing that academic scholarships are bad forms of reward for NCAA players!!!! Do you know how insulting it is to REAL and LEGITIMATE students when there are commentators talking about a 25 or 35 out of 50 being good???

    You’re praising one “F” student and one “C” student because the respective percentages are 50% and 70%, the traditional/typical percentages for letter grades like “F” or “C”!!!!!

  75. outlawshark says: Apr 4, 2012 3:47 PM

    NFL teams do a lot of things to raise flags. This test is one of them. If a player doesn’t know how many legs are in 2 cows and a chicken, there is a real problem.

  76. jikkle49 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:48 PM

    I think it’s basically a test to see if a player has a learning disability and if so how bad it is.

    In the large scheme of things it’s not really that important since different people learn in different ways.

    What it fails to test is if the player is a visual learner or not.

    Some guys if you tell them in the meeting room “If the WR lines up here than it’s going to be this play” he would struggle to get it. But if you show him on film and out on the practice field and run it in scout team he might get it perfectly fine.

    I mean Frank Gore got a 6 on his Wonderlic and he doesn’t struggle to know what he does on plays and is one of the best RBs at picking up pass protection. So it’s not like you can’t be a functional player with a low Wonderlic

  77. AlohaMrHand says: Apr 4, 2012 3:49 PM

    Here’s a Wonderlic question for Tiki.

    Take one pregnant wife,subtract her and add new trophy wife,then subtract job at NBC and add a failed comeback attempt times teams who didn’t return calls.What is the total?

  78. packattack1967 says: Apr 4, 2012 3:58 PM

    There is every reason for the NFL to require these tests and more. There’s a lot of money at stake. There is NO reason to leak these scores. The league needs to clamp down on this.

  79. bfinbrian says: Apr 4, 2012 4:00 PM

    It does matter, look at how Vince Youngs time with the Titans worked out. A team investing that kind of money wants to know if they have a generally smart person, not a head case or someone who will do things stupid off field problems

  80. rcunningham says: Apr 4, 2012 4:11 PM

    Dan Marino got a 13. The Wonderlic is irrelevant.

  81. fground says: Apr 4, 2012 4:16 PM

    Didn’t anyone watch Forest Gump?

  82. biggerballz says: Apr 4, 2012 4:20 PM

    the barbers both combined for a score of 4 on the test.

  83. raideralex99 says: Apr 4, 2012 4:21 PM

    Seriously … How can you go to university and only score a 4 on any test.

  84. jakek2 says: Apr 4, 2012 4:26 PM

    granadafan says:
    Apr 4, 2012 3:20 PM
    What does this say about that fraud of an institute of “higher” learning that is LSU? The NCAA needs to investigate them how they kept Claiborne from staying eligible.
    ————–
    Patrick Peterson bombed the test too if I remember correctly.

  85. stinkfingers says: Apr 4, 2012 4:39 PM

    “Barber says wonderlic test doesnt matter”

    Thats just something stupid people say.

  86. bangitfootball says: Apr 4, 2012 4:41 PM

    Claiborne scored a 4 lol. Vince Young scored a 7.

    Lassie scored a 18, Nemo scored a 22 and the dolphin from Dolphin Tale scored 29.

  87. 4gone says: Apr 4, 2012 4:43 PM

    Perhaps the Wunderlich result transfers very little to Football knowledge but teams are about to give a pile of cash to a kid and wonder how the athlete is going to handle it.

    It stands to reason that they would like some information on their overall intelligence. This example drives home the fact that GM’s cannot rely on College Transcripts.

    I heard that he may have the grounds to appeal his score as he got his name wrong… because he was copying off of the guy next to him.

  88. bucforever says: Apr 4, 2012 4:44 PM

    Well I am sure he will be drafted anyway. It would be interesting to have him take the test again after having his brain bounced around for a few years in the NFL. Would the grade be lower or higher?

  89. mjkelly77 says: Apr 4, 2012 6:10 PM

    … that Claiborne has a learning disability …
    ________________

    A learning disability like what? A room temperature IQ?

  90. hatesycophants says: Apr 4, 2012 6:13 PM

    My favorite posts are those comprised of a series of spelling, syntax and grammatical errors, all while calling this kid “obviously illiterate”. Yep, you can ponder your comparative intellectual superiority when you’re doing his lawn maintenance.

    Go Lions! Go Badgers!

  91. mikebacker says: Apr 4, 2012 6:14 PM

    Are they going to curve it?

  92. tweeter75 says: Apr 4, 2012 6:29 PM

    Barber must’ve scored in the single digits too.

  93. pb420 says: Apr 4, 2012 6:30 PM

    Let’s just for the sake of argument say he becomes a perennial pro bowler and is on a team that wins a championship or two. I guarantee you that his wonderlic score won’t be a topic then.

  94. leeeroooyjeeenkiiins says: Apr 4, 2012 6:32 PM

    According to an ESPN article on the subject, a few colleges did a study that found no correlation between the test and success on the field. So in that sense, Ronde is right.

    However, it also mentioned that for TEs and CBs, players who scored lower generally had BETTER careers. So if that odd trend continues, Claiborne will be the best CB of all time lol

  95. fdugrad says: Apr 4, 2012 7:08 PM

    If a former ” student athlete ” attains a Wonderlic score this shockingly low, it points once again to university standards regarding entrance requirements and the NCAA’s definition of “student”. Does a person with a learning disability belong in any college or university of HIGHER learning in the first place? One wonders what his SAT scores and high school courses and grades were and which student applying to LSU was turned down to allow Mr Claiborne to matriculate in his/her place? Absent any REAL measurement of intelligence/performance off the football field , what can teams do to assess an individual’s capacity to grasp the increased demands and learning curve on and OFF the NFL field? If Jamarcus R. and Vince Y.’s scores are indications of Claiborne’s future behavior, decision -making or ability to coach , then it should give ANY team reason to pause prior to selecting him near the top of the draft and paying him MILLIONS of dollars, not to mention perhaps making him the face of the team. With all the negative behaviors throughout the league over the past years, it is not unreasonable to require some kind of an objective measurement of intelligence and EMOTIONAL growth and development. It is obvious that the NCAA has no standards regarding these areas, so this leaves it to the NFL, in an attempt to protect their investments, as well as THE SHIELD, to have something like Wonderlic or WISC-R( an IQ test administered in many public schools when determining inclusion in special education). No wonder so many players are so detached from real world people and situations and have such a sense of entitlement—they live an existence devoid of standards/demands other than measurement of RAW football skills. Sadly, this is also a reason so many former pro athletes struggle so profoundly after their very brief careers come to an end, and real world consequences finally apply.

  96. profootballwalk says: Apr 4, 2012 7:16 PM

    First, there is no correlation between Wonderlic score and success in the NFL, except for positions in which a LOWER score correlates with success.

    Second, if you answered all the questions randomly, without even looking at the questions, you should get about a 12 – it’s multiple choice, so they give you the correct answer, with three wrong answers.

    However, if you struggle with the questions, and only answer half of them in the given time, then choose randomly again, you’d expect to get a 6. That’s without knowing a single answer correctly – just guessing.

    So when guys get single-digit scores, it’s likely they didn’t know the answer to more than one or two questions. And they still do fine in the NFL.

    I’d love to see commenters on sports web sites required to post their Wonderlic score with their name. There would be a lot less discussion of Wonderlic scores.

  97. profootballwalk says: Apr 4, 2012 7:19 PM

    fdugrad says: Apr 4, 2012 7:08 PM

    If a former ” student athlete ” attains a Wonderlic score this shockingly low, it points once again to university standards regarding entrance requirements and the NCAA’s definition of “student”. Does a person with a learning disability belong in any college or university of HIGHER learning in the first place? One wonders what his SAT scores and high school courses and grades were and which student applying to LSU was turned down to allow Mr Claiborne to matriculate in his/her place? Absent any REAL measurement of intelligence/performance off the football field , what can teams do to assess an individual’s capacity to grasp the increased demands and learning curve on and OFF the NFL field? If Jamarcus R. and Vince Y.’s scores are indications of Claiborne’s future behavior, decision -making or ability to coach , then it should give ANY team reason to pause prior to selecting him near the top of the draft and paying him MILLIONS of dollars, not to mention perhaps making him the face of the team. With all the negative behaviors throughout the league over the past years, it is not unreasonable to require some kind of an objective measurement of intelligence and EMOTIONAL growth and development. It is obvious that the NCAA has no standards regarding these areas, so this leaves it to the NFL, in an attempt to protect their investments, as well as THE SHIELD, to have something like Wonderlic or WISC-R( an IQ test administered in many public schools when determining inclusion in special education). No wonder so many players are so detached from real world people and situations and have such a sense of entitlement—they live an existence devoid of standards/demands other than measurement of RAW football skills. Sadly, this is also a reason so many former pro athletes struggle so profoundly after their very brief careers come to an end, and real world consequences finally apply.
    ——————————————

    ^^^ Has no idea what a paragraph is, yet has something to say about education.

  98. themonster49 says: Apr 4, 2012 7:58 PM

    Well… I guess I’m just selfish then.

    My being a viewer and a fan of the NFL makes them money. That money pays some or most of the salary of the players. The players are made into huge media events and ‘main attractions’. Those ‘main attractions’ keep me the viewer and me the fan liking the NFL.

    I, a viewer and a fan, want to know which player is an idiot, and which is not. I don’t want to hear rumors of which player is an idiot, and which is not. I want to be able to point at a steam-roller of a player and say “That guy might be a friggin’ idiot, but he sure can run like a train!” and I also want to be able to point at a kicker and say “He’s a kicker AND an idiot, ouch…”

    Make the test part of the process of getting into the NFL itself (like how a physical is a requirement)! Make the test scores public! Give us more knowledge of the players we are allowing you to promote to us and place onto pedestals! If he’s brilliant, let me know it! If he’s an idiot, definately let me know it!

  99. phillyman2k9 says: Apr 4, 2012 8:28 PM

    What was his SAT score???

    Sample ? ?? When rope is selling at 10 cents a foot, how many feet can you buy for 60 cents?

    OMG he guy is an idiot ….. what did he do in college?

    Sorry to say he will screw up off the field…. wish him the best !!!

  100. andyreiddoublecheeseburger says: Apr 4, 2012 8:31 PM

    I’ll trust Jimmy Johnson’s expertise on drafting before I listen to a CB. And those who say “It doesn’t matter, Dan Marino got a 13″- well Danny boy wasn’t exactly Peyton Manning running an offense (or for that matter his fellow class of ’83 QB Jim Kelly, who called his own plays). Marino dropped back, threw deep to Clayton or Duper, or dumped it to Jensen- not very complex. With enough training, and better mechanics, even Tim Tebow might be able to do that.

  101. surly1n1nd1anapol1s says: Apr 4, 2012 8:44 PM

    I suspect a level of intelligence would contribute to success in some systems, and in terms of career longevity.

    It truly reflects on the university and college system to generally educate their students. In my view LSU looks very poor.

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