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Combine president says an accommodation is available for the Wonderlic

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Tuesday’s disclosure that LSU cornerback Morris Claiborne scored a four on the Wonderlic raises important questions about the general intelligence test administered every year at the Scouting Combine and elsewhere, including by individual teams during player visits.

And so, for a change, I decided to try to find some answers.

Although agent Bus Cook claimed in response to the news that he’s aware of no “deficiency” in Claiborne, multiple reports indicate that Claiborne has a learning disability.  If that’s true (and we have no reason to believe it isn’t), Cook should have known — and Cook could have obtained an accommodation for Claiborne when taking the test.

Jeff Foster, president of National Scouting and the National Invitational Camp (otherwise known as the Scouting Combine), explained to PFT by phone on Wednesday the procedure used when a player has a learning disability.  Foster said that, in such cases, the player communicates the existence of the disability in advance of the test.  Then, documentation of the disability is obtained from the athlete’s school, and research is done regarding the accommodations provided to the player when taking tests at his college.

Once the learning disability is confirmed, Wonderlic will authorize an “untimed accommodation.”  Under this approach, the player takes the 50-question test within the 12-minute allotment.  That effort is scored separately, and the player is then permitted to continue taking the test for as long as he needs to complete it.  The Wonderlic people later apply a formula to determine the score based on the answers supplied during the 12-minute window and the answers coming thereafter.

And so, frankly, it all falls back once again to the agent.  Although, at some level, the player has the responsibility to bring his situation to the attention of those administering the test, the procedure to obtain an untimed accommodation requires advance effort, which means the agent needs to know that a player has a learning disability, and the agent must thereafter start making calls for the person from whom the agent will eventually be making money.  (The universities also should be aware of this wrinkle, and they should be ready to initiate the process on behalf of their students.)

Claiborne’s situation gives rise to a separate topic that we mentioned on Tuesday, and that Dan Patrick has been advancing for months:  Players should simply refuse to submit to the test.  Foster said that hasn’t happened, yet.

“To my knowledge, we haven’t had anyone say they’re not taking the Wonderlic test,” Foster said.  “Attendance is optional, as well as any pieces of the event.  If they refused, we would just note that to the teams, and they wouldn’t have a score.”

Foster added that he “doesn’t think that would be a positive” for the athlete, but we continue to believe that not taking the test at all is better than taking it and getting a single-digit score, especially since only Vince Young got the benefit of a do-over that pushed his score into the teens.

The fact that the numbers inevitably are leaked supports the concept of a boycott.  Foster explained that the results are sent via hard copy to one person with each team:  the G.M. or the person holding the equivalent job.  Once the information gets to one member of each of the 32 teams, nothing prevents them from telling others the scores — and there’s no way the NFL or anyone can find out how the information got out.

Given that the information will always get out, and that numbers at each extreme will always be newsworthy, the league needs to revisit its approach and reconsider whether the Wonderlic should even be administered at the Scouting Combine, or by the NFL at all.  Maybe, in the end, the test should be given by the colleges that the players attend, especially since the colleges have a clear interest in ensuring that the student-athletes avoid creating the impression that they were athletes only and not students during their time in school.

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73 Responses to “Combine president says an accommodation is available for the Wonderlic”
  1. buildthemonster says: Apr 4, 2012 9:15 PM

    “wonderlic”…. Sounds mysterious and dirty….

  2. moerawn says: Apr 4, 2012 9:16 PM

    Idiocracy.. 494 years early.

  3. samapoc says: Apr 4, 2012 9:17 PM

    After getting a 4, is an accommodation really going to help Claiborne? Besides, he’s a defender so it’s not like he has to think much beyond, “Hit other guy hard.”

    Gotta love that the numbers are consistently leaked!

  4. realitypolice says: Apr 4, 2012 9:18 PM

    Wait.

    There’s a Combine President?

  5. tx526 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:19 PM

    Learning disability……. AKA… Illiterate jock with a free ride to college.

  6. profootballwalk says: Apr 4, 2012 9:21 PM

    An untimed test defeats the whole logic of the test. It’s a test to see if you can think quickly. If you request more time, you obviously can’t think quickly. So what’s the point?

  7. browntown57 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:24 PM

    It’s been mentioned several times already, but I just don’t get the need for secrecy. Players weights, heights, 40 times, high-jumps, etc. become public at the combine, so why not just make the Wonderlic results public?

  8. voiceofrealism says: Apr 4, 2012 9:24 PM

    For crying out loud, why don’t you just stop keeping score too. Don’t want to make anyone feel bad if they lose. We are becoming such a pu$$y of a country.

  9. sprest83 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:25 PM

    Lol he is so dumb, but probably a college grad. An incredibly stupid, exploited system is college sports.

  10. Kave Krew says: Apr 4, 2012 9:27 PM

    Bus Cook has a learning disability – so can he take as long and as many attempts as needed to get his clients best interests covered???

  11. canadianvikingfaniii says: Apr 4, 2012 9:29 PM

    tx526 says:Apr 4, 2012 9:19 PM

    Learning disability……. AKA… Illiterate jock with a free ride to college.
    ————————
    You are obviously an idiot who has never been to college or hell, you may have never finished high school judging by your attitude.

    Schools have in place programs and testing for students who have difficulty in learning and reading. They don’t even need to be in the community living programs level of disability, hense the reason they have these options.

  12. godfatherd says: Apr 4, 2012 9:30 PM

    profootballwalk says:
    Apr 4, 2012 9:21 PM
    An untimed test defeats the whole logic of the test. It’s a test to see if you can think quickly. If you request more time, you obviously can’t think quickly. So what’s the point?

    ====================================

    Yes, but lets say the player has a reading disability like dyslexia. If the player reads slowly because of said disability and only answers 10 out of 50 questions you didn’t really test his intelligence and problem solving ability, you just confirmed that he reads slowly.

    Intelligence tests are biased anyway. I remember taking an intelligence test with a question asking “If a sailboat with a 5′ mast and a 4′ jib requires 23 yards of fabric to make a sail, how many yards of fabric are required if the mast is 8′ and the jib is 6 ‘” or something like that. For me that is as simple as applying a math formula. Most inner city youth are still asking themselves the the F*** a jib is.

  13. howiefeltersnatch says: Apr 4, 2012 9:30 PM

    Would you rather just have the low score or have the teams know you have a learning disability? Simply being dumb and having an actual disgnosed condition are two different things.

  14. devrick says: Apr 4, 2012 9:31 PM

    If they can have the “accommodations provided to the player when taking tests at his college,” does that mean they can just have someone else take the test for them?

  15. txxxchief says: Apr 4, 2012 9:33 PM

    If train A leaves the station at 0800 travelling east at 30 mph and train B leaves the station at 0900 travelling north at 80 mph, what color hat was the conductor on train B wearing?

  16. bearsrulepackdrool says: Apr 4, 2012 9:33 PM

    You know what? If Rich Eisen wants to run the 40, I want to see somebody take the Wonderlic test and find out how tough this test is. I mean I graduated college I probably only have a working knowledge of any and every other thing I learned in my years of schooling. But, I know the ends and outs of my profession like the back of my hand. I want to see what this test is like. If its about football and these guys’ position. I’m sure they would score higher.

  17. jcspiggle says: Apr 4, 2012 9:33 PM

    Why don’t the agents make every kid boycott that stupid test?

  18. jason49er says: Apr 4, 2012 9:36 PM

    “Foster said that, in such cases, the player communicates the existence of the disability in advance of the test. Then, documentation of the disability is obtained from the athlete’s school, and research is done regarding the accommodations provided to the player when taking tests at his college.”

    ————————————————

    Maybe he didn’t want to go this path because his accommodations went something like “the professors at my school just automatically passed me so I could play football and help make the university millions of dollars…”

  19. amgdds says: Apr 4, 2012 9:38 PM

    Whoa, whoa, whoa…in all fairness to Vince Young, he hasn’t finished his “untimed accommodation” yet.

  20. firegoodell says: Apr 4, 2012 9:39 PM

    Testing accomodations are usually put in place in either Elementary school or by Junior High – and sometimes High school – the testing modifications are spelled out in the students IEP or similar plan called a 504 – these accomodations would certainly follow the student to college and one could argue to the wonderlic at the combine. That being said – I think it is still a valid point for teams to want to know the overall intelligence of a player – not so much can they do the problems but can they “learn” – which being able to learn and absorb knowledge is more important than a score on a 12 minute test.

  21. frankdatank23 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:39 PM

    Some people just aren’t good test takers, especially when the clock is ticking….. he IS a football player. Luckily for him he’ll be paid to Play football and not perform reading comprehension on the subject. Corners and D’lineman dont need alot of brains anyway. I’d love it he fell to into my teams lap because of this.

  22. sportsmeccabi says: Apr 4, 2012 9:40 PM

    Can we be told what this learning disability is?

    My cousin has “a learning disability”. That’s what the doctor said anyway, but the reality is her learning disability is she doesn’t care about her education and is just an idiot.

  23. firegoodell says: Apr 4, 2012 9:41 PM

    tx526 says:
    Apr 4, 2012 9:19 PM
    Learning disability……. AKA… Illiterate jock with a free ride to college.

    Reaaaallly….someone is showing their lack of intelligence by making statements like this. Everyone that has a learning disability is not illiterate …. you show your own ignorance with stupid generalizations like this.

  24. jh4prez says: Apr 4, 2012 9:42 PM

    Wonderlick is totally overrated and only serves as fodder for football junkies like us.i want my players to have a greater concentration of football instincts rather than intellect.especially on the defensive side of the ball.

  25. KIR says: Apr 4, 2012 9:44 PM

    LSU reported annual football revenue of $69.4 million in 2009-10

    The most important question is how can a kid who is obviously illiterate get accepted into college and then pass enough classes to remain eligible for three years? This is why I laugh when you all are outraged that a kid accepted a few bucks from a college. The truth is the kid should never have been accepted in the first place! He’s not going to get an education……HE CAN’T READ! I’m sorry, but, these colleges should be sued for educational fraud.

  26. jimmylions says: Apr 4, 2012 9:45 PM

    “Maybe, in the end, the test should be given by the colleges that the players attend, especially since the colleges have a clear interest in ensuring that the student-athletes avoid creating the impression that they were athletes only and not students during their time in school.”
    =====================

    Didn’t you just make a case for why the colleges should not be involved in proctoring the exam?

    The colleges have a vested interest in cheating on behalf of their graduating athletes with sub-9th grade reading and math skills. Allowing the schools to proctor the exams is basically the same thing as throwing away the exams.

    The fact that it’s necessary to give the Wonderlic in the first place (because we can’t be sure that athletes who college seniors have any brain power whatsoever), and that a score in the neighborhood of 40% is considered acceptable, should be the real story.

  27. seageo says: Apr 4, 2012 9:45 PM

    I had a learning disability and was able to take standardized tests alone and untimed. I think I only did this once. I didnt like feeling different and just struggled and did it withing the time they gave me. Guess what? I still scored better than most people and probably would have done even better if I was untimed.

    That is beside the point here. he scored a 4. A FOUR!!! I dont care how much time you give him, if he could only muster 4 measly points in an hour, that is more than just a learning disability. Its called stupidity.

  28. sirsupersouthern says: Apr 4, 2012 9:45 PM

    Claiborn is obviously illiterate and guessed right 4 times…

  29. bingocostello says: Apr 4, 2012 9:46 PM

    It’s called make your mark!

  30. whatevnfl says: Apr 4, 2012 9:46 PM

    @sprest83 – isn’t he a junior?

  31. jameslongstaffe says: Apr 4, 2012 9:47 PM

    The problem is, the agent often has many clients, & to be honest… probably does not really care about this person/player as long as he gets a good contract. He doesn’t have time to worry about a learning disability lol. That would require effort beyond the job description. A learning disability is a diagnosis, but still on a spectrum, so I don’t know how to evaluate that. This “formula” is not part of Newton’s Laws, I know that much lol. I would just talk to the kid:)

  32. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 9:49 PM

    Mo started out well running the brain test, but pulled up lame.

  33. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 9:51 PM

    Although he goes by “Mo”, his full name is DeMaurice Claiborne.

  34. vikingsinla says: Apr 4, 2012 9:51 PM

    That sound you heard was Bus Cook’s prospective clients running for the door.

    Either he lied about not knowing Claiborne had a learning disability, or he knew about it and let him take the test without the “accommodations”, or he flat out didn’t know something potentially catastrophic about his client. Any of the above shows complete ineptitude.

  35. transam7816 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:52 PM

    Chill guys. He has a disability.

  36. wwwfella says: Apr 4, 2012 9:53 PM

    he’s about to make more money than most of us will ever see in our lifetime id like to be that “dumb’” too.

  37. elrock7 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:55 PM

    Strong like bull, fast like gazelle, smart like goldfish.

  38. phillyb6 says: Apr 4, 2012 9:57 PM

    LD, maybe. Or maybe he’s just a dumb guy who’s really good at playing cornerback…

  39. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 9:59 PM

    All participants were advised that there was an accomodation available. Unfortunately, only a select few knew what “accomodation” meant. They weren’t interested.

  40. triumphdog says: Apr 4, 2012 10:09 PM

    I’ve followed the NFL draft pretty serious for about 10 years now. Never have I heard The Scouting Combine referred to as the “National Invitational Camp”…

  41. rcali says: Apr 4, 2012 10:10 PM

    Wait, isn’t the purpose of a test like this one to actually see if a person is smart or not? Wouldn’t this be liking spotting a guy a half a second in the 40 yard dash if he’s considered slow?

  42. flowadelph says: Apr 4, 2012 10:11 PM

    One thing for certain another for sure he will be wealthier than all of us. You don’t have to be a genius to be successful. Hard work prevails.

  43. realitypolice says: Apr 4, 2012 10:11 PM

    Hold on a second.

    There’s a Combine President?

    I need much much more info about this.

    When he is up for re-election?

    How do I get on the ballot?

    I want to add hopscotch and duck, duck, goose to the combine drills.

    Who would be opposed to that?

  44. sullijo1 says: Apr 4, 2012 10:11 PM

    How do I get the job of “combine president.”

  45. 7to10for6allday says: Apr 4, 2012 10:18 PM

    He’s just stupid…..as long as he can play football. And I don’t want to hear oh poor him. That illiterate bum is about to make millions of dollars and if he helps your team win, you will care less about his stupidity than you do now.

  46. mtheparrothead says: Apr 4, 2012 10:19 PM

    He is also given square and circular pegs, and asked to put them in the appropriate slots.

  47. babyhorsemorgan says: Apr 4, 2012 10:29 PM

    There is accomodation available for the Wonderlic. If you test high, your accomodation will be on the upper floor. If you test low your accomodation will be in a basement suite.

  48. geniusesq says: Apr 4, 2012 10:30 PM

    Yes. An accommodation is available for the Wonderlic. It’s called a couple million dollars.

  49. geniusesq says: Apr 4, 2012 10:32 PM

    Let’s see. Would I rather have a High Wonderlic and a Low Forty Time?

    or

    Low Wonderlic and a High Forty time?

    Hmmmm. I’ll take a Wonderlic score lower than my Forty time for $30Million Alex.

  50. jazzytrav says: Apr 4, 2012 10:44 PM

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the leak actually came from a team that wants Claiborne…perhaps someone drafting in the 10-15 range. If you get the fans to think he’s an idiot, like many people have been posting here and elsewhere, it may cause teams with top draft picks to rethink their selection.

    I get that the idea is to judge how well a player can read-and-react, but you don’t get to the highest level of college football and play as well as Claiborne did with a true read-and-react competence of 4 out of 50. Make all the jokes you want about tutors doing his homework, but I’m pretty sure a tutor didn’t make all those incredible plays on the field.

  51. pir8life says: Apr 4, 2012 10:49 PM

    Sorry, a 4? Really? The Bucs will probably end up taking him (right Ronde?)

    Google “sample wonderlic questions” and take the test yourself… Most questions are multiple choice (or “multiple guess” in this case.)

    [b]He got a FOUR! [/b]

  52. steviaquinn says: Apr 4, 2012 10:53 PM

    4/50 tells me you never had to work hard at something you struggled with. Of course, he probably had many enablers that made that possible.

    In the NFL, you will struggle.

  53. footballisking says: Apr 4, 2012 11:09 PM

    I am with the above poster..Please explain more on this combine president, what does this man do and where can I apply for this gig..the scouting service (which are scouts who couldnt make it in the nfl) make the list of who goes, the teams assistant coaches run the drills, and we cant even get a consistent official 40 yard dash time on one single player…so what does this man do?????

  54. pir8life says: Apr 4, 2012 11:12 PM

    From a four letter article:
    Charlie Wonderlic Jr., president of Wonderlic Inc., says, “A score of 10 is literacy, that’s about all we can say.”

    NFL averages:
    Offensive tackles: 26
    Centers: 25
    Quarterbacks: 24
    Guards: 23
    Tight Ends: 22
    Safeties: 19
    Middle linebackers: 19
    Cornerbacks: 18
    Wide receivers: 17
    Fullbacks: 17
    Halfbacks: 16

    The average scores in other professions look like this:
    Chemist: 31
    Programmer: 29
    Newswriter: 26
    Sales: 24
    Bank teller: 22
    Clerical Worker: 21
    Security Guard: 17
    Warehouse: 15

  55. mjkelly77 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:18 PM

    … multiple reports indicate that Claiborne has a learning disability.
    ________________

    Yeah, he has a disability all right. He has a room temperature IQ.

  56. maxl49 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:25 PM

    Frank Gore scored a 6 and he turned ok … One of the best blitz bickup back in the game …

  57. mjkelly77 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:25 PM

    Why shouldn’t the scores be public knowledge in the first place? All the physical measurables and combine results are public information. The fans know that some of these guys are dumber than rocks and without the NFL would more than likely be unable to support themselves.

  58. garyman1 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:28 PM

    Out of curiosity, I just took an on-line wonderlic test… and got a 23…and I’m an idiot. It’s not that difficult.

  59. mjkelly77 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:33 PM

    jcspiggle says:Apr 4, 2012 9:33 PM

    Why don’t the agents make every kid boycott that stupid test?
    _________________

    No way I’d boycott the test If I’m a bright Ivy League grad or a member of Mensa. A good score only enhances my marketability.

  60. htwaits77 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:36 PM

    Student-athletes at LSU? I don’t believe it. Nope, it’ll never happen.

  61. randomguy9999 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:38 PM

    If I were hiring guys for this job I would definitely want to know if they could look at a written problem and figure out a potential answer to it quickly….

    Because that is what players should be doing the entire week before the game: studying everything I provide them on the other team and doing all they can to improve what they are going to do Sunday …. instead of relying on bs football IQ from high school.

    It is totally insane to suggest players shouldn’t even be tested As to their mental abilities to reason, interpret, and solve problems….. Its like saying they shouldn’t have to throw…. Just trust them on it…..

  62. mjkelly77 says: Apr 4, 2012 11:44 PM

    flowadelph says:Apr 4, 2012 10:11 PM

    One thing for certain another for sure he will be wealthier than all of us. You don’t have to be a genius to be successful. Hard work prevails.
    ___________________

    Are you equating “success” with income? If you think money is the answer then it’s really not how much you make but how much you have. Check out some of these players five years after they retire and are forced to declare bankruptcy. You’ll understand what I mean.

  63. drozman says: Apr 5, 2012 12:15 AM

    I’m very sad to see that it is so easy to blatantly make fun of a human being just because he did very poorly on a test. Would you do it if he were standing in front of you? Nope, because you’re a coward. No one cares what you scored on the test, since you will not be drafted and will not sign a million dollar contract in your life. I’d take a four and his future earnings over a 50 and your earnings plus your bullying attitude towards a young man that has done nothing but earn a living that most of us wish we could have. Enjoy your cubicle, no wonder your life is made better by bashing another human…your life is meaningless.

  64. randomcommenter says: Apr 5, 2012 1:44 AM

    He went to an SEC school which means if the combine gave him the same accommodations, they would either just give him a passing grade for no reason, or allow a 5 ft tall exchange student take it for him.

    On the bright side for him, the NFL only seems to care about wonderlic scores for a few positions (QB, OL, Safety, and MLB)

  65. jimbo75025 says: Apr 5, 2012 2:08 AM

    sportsmeccabi says:
    Apr 4, 2012 9:40 PM
    Can we be told what this learning disability is?

    My cousin has “a learning disability”. That’s what the doctor said anyway, but the reality is her learning disability is she doesn’t care about her education and is just an idiot.
    ______________

    Agreed, if you want to claim handicap put all the cards on the table.

    In this day and age I am quite sure everyone here could find a doctor to claim that they had a learning disability if they wanted to.

    The ability of someone to process info in todays complex defensive schemes and needed changes based on offensive looks is certainly an important factor. If I was a GM, would I draft a player who had gone to college for 3 years at a minimum and could not get a decent score on a test that had questions on months of the year and fractions-no way.

  66. piemasteruk says: Apr 5, 2012 2:59 AM

    I don’t want to sound coldhearted, but why should he get special accomodation if he has a learning disability? What next? Do overweight players get their 40 times lowered? Do players with a dignosed drug addictions get a ‘do over’ on their blood test?

  67. douc66 says: Apr 5, 2012 5:44 AM

    There is another consideration to why some agents may not choose the “accommodation” avenue: how would it look if you said your client had a learning disability? The first thing in a lot of people’s mind (and judging by the remarks here, this bears out to be true) that the guy is “dumb”, a label which could potentially lose your guy millions. A college playbook is one thing; however, in the NFL where most talent are about equal, intelligence will also play a factor. So, of course your not going to fess up that your guy may have a learning disability…

  68. samlv4 says: Apr 5, 2012 6:56 AM

    After reading some of the above comments….. Wow..
    This kid in not stupid. He could have learning differences that have never been address. These issues should have been address at an earlier time in his life. Most of these go undiagnosed due to the school systems. Then they just keep passing him through the system. He had an athletic gift. So he went to college. Most of our founding fathers had learning difficulties. Einstein could not tie his shoes until 9 yr old. Bill Gates is another. The list goes on. Would any of you say these guy are stupid? 1 out of 5 have a learning disability and are covered by the American Disability Act. Think before you attack another. This does not affect how intelligent you are you just learn different.

  69. wicky888 says: Apr 5, 2012 7:08 AM

    The reason these guys score so low most of the time is that have been given “accommodations” throughout their whole educational careers.

  70. kokomike says: Apr 5, 2012 7:54 AM

    Imagine if everyone in your company had to take the test. Your boss would probably score under a 10.

  71. steeelfann says: Apr 5, 2012 8:03 AM

    Why do we keep talking about “leaked” reports when it comes to the Wonderlic? They don’t”t leak the 40 yard dash, they don’t leak the bench press or the shuttle. Your 40 time is who you are. Your Wonderlic score is who you are.

    Why are we so PRIVATE about the mental aspect but public about the physical tests?

    You are what your scores are.

    It is like hiding something, sealing things up. Why? Why would you have your college records sealed up? What are you hiding?

  72. godfatherd says: Apr 5, 2012 4:57 PM

    steeelfann says:
    Apr 5, 2012 8:03 AM
    Why do we keep talking about “leaked” reports when it comes to the Wonderlic? They don’t”t leak the 40 yard dash, they don’t leak the bench press or the shuttle. Your 40 time is who you are. Your Wonderlic score is who you are.

    Why are we so PRIVATE about the mental aspect but public about the physical tests?

    You are what your scores are.

    It is like hiding something, sealing things up. Why? Why would you have your college records sealed up? What are you hiding?

    =====================================

    Seriously, you think peoples college records should be public? I’ve always been a personal liberty and privacy man myself

  73. granadafan says: Apr 5, 2012 5:06 PM

    “geniusesq says: Apr 4, 2012 10:32 PM
    Let’s see. Would I rather have a High Wonderlic and a Low Forty Time? or
    Low Wonderlic and a High Forty time?

    Hmmmm. I’ll take a Wonderlic score lower than my Forty time for $30Million Alex.”

    ===============================================

    Given a very low Wonderlic score and being functionally illiterate, you’ll be broke within 2 years. Guaranteed.

    Back to the story. Either Bus Cook is the worst agent in the country in not preparing his client or they invented this story about a learning disability. Also, they are not specifying what learning disability Claiborne supposedly has and who “diagnosed” it. If LSU coach Les Miles “diagnosed” it then this this disability is a sham.

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