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Williams’ remarks brings injury reports back into focus

Philadelphia Eagles v Washington Redskins Getty Images

Last month, when word first broke of the Saints using a bounty system for three years, we pointed out at some point that the targeting of players for injuries will do nothing to make teams more candid about the reporting of existing player injuries.  Now that the audio of Gregg Williams’ pre-game comments from January 2012 has been released, with graphic instructions on how to inflict injury on opponents, look for coaches to be even more reluctant to disclose who is hurt and what is hurting them.

As many of you have suggested, it also may be time for the NFL to revisit its injury-reporting policies.  We have long believed that the NFL has constructed a cursory set of injury guidelines in order to create the impression that there is no inside information for folks with gambling interests to attempt to obtain by, for example, offering envelopes full of cash to someone in the organization who knows the truth.  Now that we know Williams was offering envelopes full of cash to players who successfully knocked other players out of games, the NFL may be forced to choose between the lesser of two cash-envelopes evils.

Since the league’s injury-reporting system currently has plenty of flaws that the league doesn’t seem inclined to fix, maybe the NFL should adopt an NHL-style “upper body”/”lower body” approach to injuries, which would then possibly give folks who plan to target players for injuries a more vague bull’s eye.

Of course, that won’t solve the problem.  There has always been a strategic benefit to knocking key members of the opposing team out of a game.  But most players and coaches have refrained from declaring that reality publicly.

Redskins cornerback DeAngelo Hall pulled back the curtain last September, when Washington was preparing to play the Cowboys and quarterback Tony Romo, who was recovering from a rib injury.  “I want to get a chance to put my helmet on whatever’s hurt,” Hall said.  “Romo’s ribs — I’m going to be asking for some corner blitzes.  If I know Felix Jones’ shoulder’s hurt, I’m not going to cut him.  I’m definitely going to try to hit him up high, so that’s just part of it.

“If you know something’s wrong with an opponent, you’re going to try to target in on that,” Hall added.  “We’re going to try to definitely get as many hats on that team as possible.”

Here’s what I added at the time:  “Hall isn’t saying anything that football players don’t already think.  Especially at the quarterback position, any opportunity to knock the starter out of the game should be embraced.”

Several Saints fans, grasping for anything that will draw attention away from the stunning comments of their former defensive coordinator, have suggested that what I wrote seven months ago is no different than what Williams said in January.  To that I say, “Child please.”  The difference is that what I wrote is something that players innately know to be true, and that the line is hopelessly crossed when a man who isn’t putting on a uniform and entering harm’s way commands his troops to, essentially, “sweep the leg.”

The Saints fans who have been looking for something/anything to cushion the consequences of offering money to inflict injury and/or urging players to inflict specific types of injuries also have overlooked the next paragraph of our story from September 2011:  “But when it comes to putting a helmet on Romo’s ribs, Hall should be careful not to do it when Romo is in the act of throwing a pass, or when he has just thrown a pass.  Under the rules, Romo is defenseless at those times, and he can’t be hit in the helmet or with a helmet.”

If a player hits another player hard within the confines of the rules and the player who receives the hit can’t continue to play because of it, that’s a traditionally unspoken strategic reality of football.  If, for example, Hall successfully had blasted Romo during the ensuing game and Romo’s backup would have been forced into the fray, the Redskins would have had a better chance to win.

The balance the NFL now has to strike as it tries to change its culture comes from the inherent difference between the things that players and coaches already know — and the things that coaches and players say openly about the things they know.  As part of that balance, the NFL needs to reconsider whether and to what extent players and coaches should ever know that opponents enter a given game already injured.

In the end, that may be the only way to properly address what was, before March 2, an open secret for the NFL.

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61 Responses to “Williams’ remarks brings injury reports back into focus”
  1. TaiwanMike says: Apr 8, 2012 10:50 AM

    Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Injury reports are either too vague or too specific. This is one of those problems where there is no good solution.

  2. bathroombenlovemachine says: Apr 8, 2012 10:51 AM

    Maybe DeAngelo Hall wanted to make inter-racial man on man love to Tony Romo.

  3. shinnbone says: Apr 8, 2012 10:53 AM

    I still think he paid someone to take out Sean Payton’s “ACL”

  4. deepthreat says: Apr 8, 2012 10:56 AM

    Injuries are one of the bad things about football, but they occur – and are intentionally inflicted – whether players are paid or not.

    Gambling is another problem entirely. If we aren’t sure if the games are legit or not, we might as well turn on the WWF.

  5. anrockray says: Apr 8, 2012 10:58 AM

    I guess Jeff Fisher gets a free pass in all this? Don’t tell me he wasn’t aware of Gregg Williams methods when he hired him in St. Louis after working with him in Tennessee all those years. And Fisher’s also on the Competition Committee…disturbing.

  6. kdt1963 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:00 AM

    So where are the videos of all of the late hits, hits on defenseless players, and injured players being carted off the field?

    Amazing how, with the Saints, it isn’t the actual injuries that were inflicted; it was the perceived “intent”. But with Giants it wasn’t the intent; it was whether someone actually got hurt.

    Guess that’s why you got out of the lawyer business, Mike. Facts are a pesky thing.

  7. larryfinfan says: Apr 8, 2012 11:00 AM

    Hehehe….knew it was time for you to start up the ‘injury reporting procedure’ again…one of the phobias you lawyer-turned-media guys seem to have…. Tell me, would it have made a difference in this case ?? I didn’t think so either…

  8. ascensionparish says: Apr 8, 2012 11:02 AM

    But you did say, ” Any opportunity to knock the starter out the game should be embraced?”

    I don’t think Saints fans are trying to cushion the blow as much as point out the hypocricy and righteous indignation of many in the media.

  9. duanethomas says: Apr 8, 2012 11:03 AM

    ….and this too shall pass. You can not change the game, football is a violence sport. Always has been, always will be, boxers, rugby and hockey 0players do the samething. If a players is coming off a injury you test it and use it to your advantage.

  10. FinFan68 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:05 AM

    Just get rid of the injury report altogether. They are only used for the Vegas lines (which the NFL claims not to support) and FF leagues. FF can make concessions for players who don’t play in a game at all due to prior injury.

  11. truthfactory says: Apr 8, 2012 11:09 AM

    Good things Williams isnt african american… Then all his supportors would have pointed to his race being the reason he has been banned, and ignoring his actions…. Kind of like they did with Vick a few years ago.

  12. dryzzt23 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:10 AM

    Wait just a second here

    If I tell you to jump off a bridge and you go ahead and are stupid enough to jump, then whose fault is that?

    It’s your fault for TAKING THE ACTION, it’s not my fault just b/c I put the idea in your head.

    These are grown men, who have a CHOICE to make, either make the hit and make some money, or not make an overtly violent hit and still get your huge game check.

    If there is anything conclusive in the injury reports, then the blame should be squarely on the players.
    The PLAYERS are On the FIELD
    GW is NOT on the field

    Therefore GW cannot be directly responsible for injuring anybody

  13. nola5712 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:11 AM

    As you pointed out by using the word, “several”, not ALL Saints fans think our team is innocent. Each and every individual involved needs to be punished.

    That being said, do I believe we’re the only team doing this? That’s a resounding “No”. But what can we as Saints fans do about it? The answer to that is nothing. The evidence is damning against Williams and the rest so there’s no point in crying about it.

    Williams is a tool, and I wholeheartedly agree with the majority that he should never coach again. What a good portion of Saints fans who are upset want, is a little justice in the form of investigating other teams who clearly take part in the same actions.

    I’d rather be a Saints fan defending my apparent bounty hunting team, than a Steelers fan defending an alleged multiple rapist (not a shot against the Steelers, just pointing out that it must have been annoying as hell to fend off the trolls).

    Same offense. Check. New Defense. Check. We’ll be fine.

  14. whatsafairway says: Apr 8, 2012 11:12 AM

    Just report so and so has a boo-boo.

    This will make the fantasy geeks happy since they will know not to start him and otherwise nothing specific for another team to target.

  15. profootballwalk says: Apr 8, 2012 11:17 AM

    Belichick is looking pretty smart for being so vague on the injury report, isn’t he? He’s been protecting his players – who cares about the degenerate gamblers?

  16. emperorzero says: Apr 8, 2012 11:19 AM

    The NHL injury system isn’t perfect, but it does make it more difficult for players to target a specific area. If Romo is reported to have an “upper body injury,” then Hall doesn’t necessarily know to aim for the ribs. Romo could have a shoulder injury, a sore back, etc. Does it make Romo safe? No, but it provides a bit more protection for a specific injured area.

    And once again Saints fans are missing the point. The punishment isn’t about intent, it’s the fact that the Saints blatantly lied to Goodell and the league. If the Saints had stopped this nonsense in 2010 or even came clean this year, this most likely quietly gets swept under the rug and that’s the end of it.

  17. kungfubillysims says: Apr 8, 2012 11:22 AM

    I have to agree with Mike on this one.
    It has been hilarious listening to you Saints fans try to grasp onto any piece of information that could possibly deflect any attention away from the horrible things your team and coaches did.
    Try this: imagine we’re talking about another team that put bounties on players from your team and think about how mad you would be. It’s very simple you would be furious and calling for heads to fly.
    But since it’s your team you blame the media’s “righteous indignation”.
    You should seriously listen to yourselves. You have not ceased to amaze me for even one day with your excuses since this whole thing went down.

  18. billinlouisiana says: Apr 8, 2012 11:23 AM

    Most often everyone knows what injuries a player has if they got them during a game anyway. Usually it’s the ones they got during team practices that you wouldn’t be sure of without the current injury reporting system. I’d say just go to reporting on the chances of if the player will play (out, doubtful, questionable, probable)

  19. GG Eden says: Apr 8, 2012 11:23 AM

    Further on the gray area, the complexity of the issue….

    1. Targeting injuries or deliberately intending to injure is ‘wrong’.

    2. But it’s been part of football and always will. Comments from Carson Palmer recently for instance that paint a more common-sense approach “that’s football, so much happens in split seconds, bodies all coming from different angles, collisions, etc”

    3. Complaints about the evolution of football turning to flag football are correct. Players and fans want the game to not change.

    4. But it’s all driven by lawsuits, including former players hypocritically, so there’s an agenda by the commissioner to scapegoat. The possible ‘third person’ you were intimating in the Gleason-Pamphelon article about how the audio got to be leaked on the eve of appeals.

    5. Comments/realities noted by DeAngelo Hall, Giants players on Kyle Williams, etc etc. There’s plenty of similar ‘sanctioned’ acts going on in NFL teams, coached into players and known by the players, the nature of the sport, so the Saints over-demonized.

    6. Every fumble scrum involves players causing bodily harm, and it’s celebrated as a rite of passage.

    7. NFL itself promoting Bounty Bowl and Body Bag games, etc.

    8. The legitimate complaints from players about the spate of fines, even for things like face-masking etc.

    9. A lot of demonizing comes from shills and paid NFL employees. For eg, Sapp himself saying what he says post-football vs Sapp in his career. Or Romanoski speaking ill of it, etc.

    10. The very rabbit hole itself of Pandora’s box. How it could damage names like Jeff Fisher, for instance, or an old legend like Joe Gibbs.

    I haven’t really explained it brilliantly succinctly, but the bottom-line is, it’s too complex and gray for anyone to take a firm stand in this issue either for or against whatever, because so many other aspects of the for or against spill across that we condone and like or realize is part of the realities.

  20. godcanfirealdavis says: Apr 8, 2012 11:25 AM

    And all this is a shock to people??? It’s fricking FOOTBALL people! If you have played any from high school to college you know this is what coaches and players think! Get over it! It’s a full contact competitive sport! What’s next?? Taking away old time greats accomplishments cause they headhunted anybody with the ball?? What a joke this great game is becoming…. Kinda like our country as a whole..

  21. macwomack says: Apr 8, 2012 11:30 AM

    Love the karate kid reference

  22. kokomike says: Apr 8, 2012 11:33 AM

    Dexter Manley always wanted to hit someone so hard that they blew snot bubbles. That is just hard nosed football.

    If Williams had promoted snot bubbles, we would all probably be joking about it. Williams crossed the line, offering money and promoting potentially career ending injuries.

  23. crabboil says: Apr 8, 2012 11:46 AM

    If Drew Brees was getting hit like Brett Favre was getting hit, I would be livid…

    … And all that anger would be directed at the Saints offensive line.

    I expect people to go after Drew Brees. Dude is awesome. Payton and Loomis know this as well. That’s why the Saints have one of the best lines in the business.

  24. skoobyfl says: Apr 8, 2012 11:50 AM

    I suppose if football wasn’t a contact sport, things would get better for injured players. Your ability to play in any event that involves high pay / high risk is just that, a risk.

    If a player didn’t play hard & hit hard, would he be doing his job ??

  25. j0esixpack says: Apr 8, 2012 11:55 AM

    Goodell should have changed the injury reporting policy years ago… Inherent in its design is the fact that the Commissioner puts gambling interests ahead of player safety.

    Any coach who dares put player safety ahead of lucrative gambling interests who need an accurate Las Vegas Line can count on seeing substantial fines and penalties from Goodell himself.

    As it turns out, in the eyes of the players, Belichick was right to withhold as many injury details as he could, regardless of how mad Goodell was or is about it.

  26. switch123 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:58 AM

    BORE_ING,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
    Come on Draft , geezzz tired of this REPLAY button of beaten down news.

  27. 1buckeye76 says: Apr 8, 2012 11:58 AM

    I would avoid quoting chad johnson at all costs

  28. GG Eden says: Apr 8, 2012 12:00 PM

    this whole issue is far too complex for one to take a stand for/against.

    One cannot do so because there’s hypocrisy or contradiction in store. It’s a big fuzzy gray line.

    Eg…Yes, deliberately targeting injured areas or trying to injure players is not ‘in the spirit’, however, it is ‘in the spirit’ in football (compared to other sports) because it’s centered on violent contact. Whereas a game like soccer or basketball, contact is theoretical and minimal, so those sorts of tactics or realities are not there.

    Also, the difference you make in your point above comes from coaching. It’s how the game has been played for decades BECAUSE that’s how it has been coached for decades — again, that’s the nature/spirit of football compared to basketball, soccer, etc.

  29. dirtmcgirt24 says: Apr 8, 2012 12:09 PM

    nola5712 says:
    Apr 8, 2012 11:11 AM

    What a good portion of Saints fans who are upset want, is a little justice in the form of investigating other teams who clearly take part in the same actions.

    —–

    “Clearly?” Like 50,000 pages and audio evidence? Provide it, and rest assured, the league will investigate it.

  30. nuclearwarfare says: Apr 8, 2012 12:18 PM

    dryzzt23 says:
    Apr 8, 2012 11:10 AM
    Wait just a second here

    If I tell you to jump off a bridge and you go ahead and are stupid enough to jump, then whose fault is that?

    It’s your fault for TAKING THE ACTION, it’s not my fault just b/c I put the idea in your head.

    These are grown men, who have a CHOICE to make, either make the hit and make some money, or not make an overtly violent hit and still get your huge game check.

    If there is anything conclusive in the injury reports, then the blame should be squarely on the players.
    The PLAYERS are On the FIELD
    GW is NOT on the field

    Therefore GW cannot be directly responsible for injuring anybody

    -By your logic, Charles Manson should be immediately released from prison and should be able to live the rest of his life as a free man.

  31. robf2010 says: Apr 8, 2012 12:44 PM

    So, what is the issue here?

    Is it the bounty money or player safety?

    If it’s player safety, then every team that targets players in this manner is guilty. We now know the Saints and Giants both targeted Kyle Williams and his concussions. My guess is the number of teams that do this is closer to 32 than it is to 2. If it’s the money, it was peanuts and worthy of a peanut punishment.

    Is it the words or the deeds?

    If it’s the words, the Saints are guilty of inflammatory, er, something. If it’s the deeds, they’re not guilty of anything.

  32. wholelottacrazygoingon says: Apr 8, 2012 12:46 PM

    You are correct Florio, what you said in September is something that defensive players innately know to be true. But the same holds true for what Williams said.

    Please look into the injury statistics and the number of unsportsmanlike penalties against the Saints between ’09-11 and let us know if they caused more injuries or had more personal foul/unsportsmanlike penalties than the other 31 NFL teams.

    If you cannot demonstrate any actual harm caused by the Saints, or under any Williams coached defense, then all of this boils down to another example of people falling all over themselves for the opportunity to hysterically demonstrate their self righteous indignation for the world to see how much better they claim to be than others.

    Yes, what Williams said was wrong but, absent harm and absent the application of the same logic you apply to your own comments this boils down to little more than a witch hunt.

  33. robf2010 says: Apr 8, 2012 12:51 PM

    ““Clearly?” Like 50,000 pages and audio evidence? Provide it, and rest assured, the league will investigate it.”

    Start with the Super Bowl Champion Giants, who targeted Kyle Williams the same way the Saints did. Interview their players using techniques that manipulate the weak-minded as Attorney Florio suggested they should have done to the Saints two years ago. Look at whatever meeting tapes and internal emails they have that haven’t been recently incinerated. Examine the raw footage of Giants games in the NFL Films library for inflammatory rhetoric and release that to the public to bolster their case. Use the same campaign manager for the Giants that they used for the Saints. This is not hard if they’re inclined.

  34. greenbloodking says: Apr 8, 2012 12:53 PM

    “Sweep the leg…. You have a problem with that?”

    “No Sensei.”

    “No Mercy.”

    Love the reference there. But at the end of the day this problem isn’t going away any time soon. It’s a part of todays game. Maybe everyone should take the Jim Brown approach.

  35. vmannj says: Apr 8, 2012 12:56 PM

    “If, for example, Hall successfully had blasted Romo during the ensuing game and Romo’s backup would have been forced into the fray, the Redskins would have had a better chance to win.”

    How much of a chance to the Redskins need? Romo’s rib was broken. Dez Bryant and Miles Austin both missed that game b/c of leg injuries. Felix Jones had a bum shoulder. The receivers that DID play didn’t even know the formations (Kevin Ogletree). It’s laughable to me that redskins still found a way to lose that game.

  36. xxwhodatxx says: Apr 8, 2012 1:00 PM

    Coach suspended or not I find all of this hilarious bc it outs all these idiot broadcasters and bloggers like Florio for being hypocrites. They celebrate big hits, the NFL sells big hit posters on its website yea GW was out of line completely but I’d bet 98% of the hits the saints put on ppl were legal. And I’d also be willing to bet if the league had specific instances of over the top illegal hits there would be a list going around.

  37. andyreiddoublecheeseburger says: Apr 8, 2012 1:04 PM

    This makes me think of Ryan Fitzpatrick last year. Teammates like Stevie Johnson and others have basically stated that he played the second half of the year with broken ribs, yet there wasn’t any hint of this on the injury reports. Seems like Gailey and the Bills knew that to reveal it would be problematic. Look at the NHL- all they ever say is “player A has a lower body injury”. I think the NFL should stop catering to the slimeball gamblers and let teams take a similar approach.

  38. waltdawg says: Apr 8, 2012 1:07 PM

    Whatever….Maybe we could now make it flag football….It is getting to be too much. Too much.

    Too much. When will it end?

  39. mrznyc says: Apr 8, 2012 1:07 PM

    Get rid of face masks and the discussion is over.

  40. boltfansmith says: Apr 8, 2012 1:19 PM

    I seem to remember Jeff Fisher telling his defense to hurt S. Merriman in 08′. Hasn’t been the same since and he called Fisher out on it thru media.
    Fisher would live to have Williams they are the perfect fit.

  41. kronix7 says: Apr 8, 2012 1:32 PM

    As far as Fisher is concerned there isn’t any damning evidence but if there is than let the hammer fall. If Saints* fans are the ones that are pointing other coaches than “child please”

  42. saints4evah says: Apr 8, 2012 1:34 PM

    It’s been tough these few weeks watching people pile on us like the Saints are some kind of team full of Lyle Alzados and pretending that this kind of stuff is brand new, never heard of and some sort of sensational breaking story of monolithic outrage. This is football, and players have been saying this kind of thing and doing this kind of thing since it was first played. Finally a handful of reporters are starting to actually REPORT again, showing that this is, and always was, a witch hunt. The Saints players never tried a dirty shot, no matter what their idiot DC tried to whip them into a frenzy to do. There is a league wide culture of trash talk, a few dirty players, and a few dirty coaches, and to punish the whole team and attempt to punish the whole team like this is ludicrous. It is a shameful thing that a pencil pushing geek who never strapped on a cleat to have this kind of hypocrisy and this kind of power and zero oversight while everybody who works for the NFL and reports on it rush in to pucker up to his browneye and fawn over his unprecedented action, when no matter what was SAID, the play was as clean as it gets. With the exception of a couple of late hits on Brett Favre, there has been no questionable play. i watched every game. i am a fan, but also a fan of fair play, and i would have been angry to see bad hits, dirty shots and there has been NONE. you folks piling on and pretending your teams don’t have the same crap going on in their locker rooms are hypocrites. Plain and simple. You have no credibility, zealously unfair, and you have been just plain outrageously wrong.

  43. thebiglabreeski says: Apr 8, 2012 2:10 PM

    All these slapd1cks that feel that everyone in the saints org had to have known and are ALL to blame, including Brees, our offense, special teams, and fan base (childish Katrina comments are warranted, right), are the very same slapd1cks who claimed brees should have an asterisk next to his record because of how wussified the league has become since the record was originally set. When you deal with brainless troglodytes, you can’t win for losing…hell, you can’t win for winning.

  44. luvyablue says: Apr 8, 2012 2:32 PM

    It seems, to me, that many of the fans of professional football are getting a glimpse of “how the sausage is made” and they don’t like it.

    Seems to me that this whole thing comes down to the NFL punishing the team that didn’t get caught, but wouldn’t stop. Because, the NFL was willing to sweep it under the rug for years, then the whole “ethics” or “moral” or “safety” argument is out the window. This, in my opinion, is all about the NFL covering it’s ass.

    Many (not all) teams/coaches/players are “guilty” of intent to knock the ever living crap out of opposing players. Many past and current players openly admit to targeting opponents injuries. Is it nice? no. Is it something we want our kids thinking is right? no. but….

    That’s how the sausage is made. Sorry. If you don’t like it, stop eating the sausage.

    Personally, I’d like to go down the rabbit hole and get all the info on all the teams/players/coaches out in the whole league and let’s see just how the sausage is made.

  45. luvyablue says: Apr 8, 2012 2:36 PM

    let’s just make it a rule that inside the pile ups, player are required to play patty-cakes

  46. rezburna says: Apr 8, 2012 2:37 PM

    All the Saints hits came within the confines of the rules. That’s why the were one of the least penalized teams in the NFL. In 3 years of a bounty program, it was rare to see anybody get hurt against the Saints. As I’ve stated before, I WISH they would’ve been knocking players out of the game. If it doesn’t sound right for a person who doesn’t put a uniform (a coach) to tell his players to get other players out of the game, it sounds just as wrong for a sports journalist who doesn’t put a uniform to say the opposite. You can keep believing all these players and former players who claimed to have never went out to intentionally harm people, just hit them hard. Okay…whatever. If that was the case you’d hit them just hard enough to get them to the ground, instead of trying to level players with every chance you get. Yes, I’m talking to you Warren Sapp. It’s football…or maybe it’s not. Grab some flags and let’s just get this over with already.

  47. saints4evah says: Apr 8, 2012 2:55 PM

    Upvote for “how the sausage is made”…well said…and like i said in another post…The Saints no more put dirty hits on people’s injured spots than Mike Tyson actually ate anyone’s children…..it’s locker room bravado…nothing more than trash talk to get motivated…Our boys never carried any of these alleged “hits” out…This is ridiculous…trying to kill our season for thought crimes is preposterous.

  48. fiadbag says: Apr 8, 2012 3:34 PM

    The best part of this whole “BountyGate” debacle has been the ability to watch/read/listen to all of the hand-wringing, teeth-knashing, crybagging Vikings/Favre/Colts/Mediawannabe fans STILL trying to justify why the Saints spanked everyone on their way to winning the Super Bowl. As bad as this has been as a Saints’ fan, I can’t imagine having to live with myself being a Vikings’ fan after selling out my soul to accept bringing in Favre, and not having anything to show for it (thanks AP/Harvin for all of the fumbles). I mean, how humiliating must it be to put all of your marbles into one player who absolutely made a living of kicking your team’s ass for a decade, and for him to still choke at the end…OUCH. That’s gotta sting. Then for the Saints to go out and beat Peyton Manning and the Colts in the Super Bowl, jeez, can you imagine if you were both a fan of the Vikings AND friends with someone, like, say Tony Dungy? What a nightmare. I’d be beyond pissed. So much so, that I would take any objectivity out of anything that I look at in the NFL regarding the Saints and bash everything about the team, the franchise, and their fan base every chance I get.

    I’ve never tasted tears so sweet. Every time this “objective” website puts out another Saints-bashing article, I get to re-live the awesomeness of being a Saints’ fan during the 2009 Super Bowl run.

  49. commandercornpone says: Apr 8, 2012 3:48 PM

    come on now. some of yall write “degenerate gambler” like it is a bad thing.

    if people dont want the ir to be used as a tool… just have the players marked as out, doubtful, questionable and probable. no specific injury or body part.

    get those details from news reports or watch the actual games.

    the aints are merely being punished due to all the attention on concussions etc. altho i would imagine fewer teams will sign up to be recorded anymore.

    and the libtard media, yes, they are hopping on the bandwagon (acting like they are in the lead, like a certain politician we all know) so they can act morally superior… when all who know them well know they surely arent morally superior.

  50. chawk12thman says: Apr 8, 2012 3:53 PM

    Lets not start thinking the NFL can stop or even curb someone’s morality or hide specific injuries of players. They can enforce and hold coaches/players accountable for the rules…….which is what they have done. Lets move on.

  51. dave61548 says: Apr 8, 2012 4:02 PM

    @kungfubillysims

    You said:
    Apr 8, 2012 11:22 AM
    I have to agree with Mike on this one.
    It has been hilarious listening to you Saints fans try to grasp onto any piece of information that could possibly deflect any attention away from the horrible things your team and coaches did.
    **************
    Please share with all of us the “horrible things” the Saints did. Go back and compile a list of unnecessary roughness penalties, document all the opposing players the Saints knocked out of games. In fact, how about you count all the penalties the Saints had in the SF playoff game aster that rousing speech by GW? I’ll save you the trouble on the last one – ZERO. ZIP. ZILCH. NADA. Not a single penalty, much less anything related to unnecessary roughness. And they do “horrible things”????

  52. lnfinite says: Apr 8, 2012 4:15 PM

    Taint fans still continue to deny the obvious. I pitied New Orleand after katrina a few years back and now pity them even more for their denial and delusion.

  53. denverscott says: Apr 8, 2012 4:22 PM

    “child please” Go away fool, EARN some money

  54. denverscott says: Apr 8, 2012 4:25 PM

    @commandre…..bur derrrrr. Um derrrrr ber durrrr Gonna der ya’…. here comes…… DERRRRRR!

  55. CKL says: Apr 8, 2012 5:46 PM

    billinlouisiana says: Apr 8, 2012 11:23 AM

    Most often everyone knows what injuries a player has if they got them during a game anyway. Usually it’s the ones they got during team practices that you wouldn’t be sure of without the current injury reporting system. I’d say just go to reporting on the chances of if the player will play (out, doubtful, questionable, probable)
    –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
    THat’s a good compromise, IMO. I wish they could do away with the injury reports altogether, but that’s a pipe dream. They have to act like they hate gambling even though if they had, they never would have let Vick back in the league strictly based on his being bankrupt, not caring about his sentencing/trial enough not to be caught smoking weed in violation of his terms, and running an interstate gambling operation. You want to talk about a guy who was right at “perfect storm of a guy who might throw games?”. Broke, jobless, no skills outside of a cannon arm, and fast legs, loves drugs so much he can’t stay away from them even though he’s in the midst of a legal minefield..it would be him. NFL didn’t care & reinstated him, so it just points out the BS involved with the injury report and gambling. Player safety>>>>>>>>>>>>>gambling IMO.

  56. billycarp says: Apr 8, 2012 6:09 PM

    Florio got caught with his pants down and now he’s trying to do damage control. I’m glad to know that you think if there’s a chance to take a player “out” (injure on purpose) that you think he should take advantage of it. The fact that you never mentioned this before now speaks loud and clear.

    Please don’t assume that you readers are that stupid.

  57. billycarp says: Apr 8, 2012 6:16 PM

    PS – Honestly there’s not much difference between the position of Gregg Williams and Mike Florio. Both believe that players should try to injure a player on purpose to gain an advantage. The only difference is Florio doesn’t believe Gregg Williams should have paid extra for it. Florio doesn’t have a moral argument, it’s a “financial” argument. Child please!!!

  58. jackntorres says: Apr 8, 2012 7:15 PM

    Especially at the quarterback position, any opportunity to knock the starter out of the game should be embraced.
    —–
    Yeah. I’m never going to let you forget that you published this line. Cheers.

  59. jackntorres says: Apr 8, 2012 7:32 PM

    How’s the glass house now?

  60. jkaflagg says: Apr 8, 2012 8:47 PM

    Of course, your case is considerably weakened by using the great MeAngelo Hall as your example of “targeting” an opponent….noy only did MeAngelo get nowhere near Romo in the game, he blew a coverage that led to the winning points, then threw the defensive coordinator under the bus to try and cover up his failure……If you want to make a case for targeting an opponent, find someone who will actually hit people, not just talk about it……

  61. axespray says: Apr 9, 2012 3:40 AM

    fiadbag says:Apr 8, 2012 3:34 PM

    The best part of this whole “BountyGate” debacle has been the ability to watch/read/listen to all of the hand-wringing, teeth-knashing, crybagging Vikings/Favre/Colts/Mediawannabe fans STILL trying to justify why the Saints spanked everyone on their way to winning the Super Bowl. As bad as this has been as a Saints’ fan, I can’t imagine having to live with myself being a Vikings’ fan after selling out my soul to accept bringing in Favre, and not having anything to show for it (thanks AP/Harvin for all of the fumbles). I mean, how humiliating must it be to put all of your marbles into one player who absolutely made a living of kicking your team’s ass for a decade, and for him to still choke at the end…OUCH. That’s gotta sting. Then for the Saints to go out and beat Peyton Manning and the Colts in the Super Bowl, jeez, can you imagine if you were both a fan of the Vikings AND friends with someone, like, say Tony Dungy? What a nightmare. I’d be beyond pissed. So much so, that I would take any objectivity out of anything that I look at in the NFL regarding the Saints and bash everything about the team, the franchise, and their fan base every chance I get.

    I’ve never tasted tears so sweet. Every time this “objective” website puts out another Saints-bashing article, I get to re-live the awesomeness of being a Saints’ fan during the 2009 Super Bowl run.
    ———————————————–
    don’t forget Favre’s BFFs Peter King & Company… they all got their espn personalities to whip up a Ted Thompson Witchhunt, now they probably paid the league to investigate the 09 saints for “bounties”.

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