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Could Williams’ audio revolutionize injury reports?

It’s a topic we addressed Sunday, when many of you were enjoying the holiday weekend or watching golf or otherwise not working (and thus not reading PFT while at work).  And so it’s a topic worth discussing again.

With former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams urging his troops to specifically target members of the San Francisco offense for injury prior to their January 2012 playoff game, will the NFL and/or its teams view the obligation to report injuries differently moving forward?

If the goal is to limit liability to current and future players who believe they were targeted for injury to already injured areas, it’s an important question.

I tried to answer it during Monday’s PFT Live.

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17 Responses to “Could Williams’ audio revolutionize injury reports?”
  1. mjbulls45 says: Apr 9, 2012 3:19 PM

    but then the lines for gambling would be all messed up ,

    aka

    im not putting money on someone who is half healthy,

    but w/o injury report, how do i know

  2. vuudu says: Apr 9, 2012 3:26 PM

    Yes, it is a stupid policy and needed to be change. The Patriots have been ahead of most of the teams in this league. I have always wondered why Belichick will only list players with upper body contusion, lower body injury, midsection injury.
    These three categories should be enough for Vegas.
    They need to find a smart way to label concussion as well.

  3. blacknole08 says: Apr 9, 2012 3:26 PM

    Sadly, I don’t think this will change a thing. Coaches will still put emphasis on “knocking said players head off” or “hitting said player in the mouth.” That’s just competitive football talk that most would take with a grain of salt. Hell, I’ve heard alot of my friends say waaay worse stuff about player injuries and such.

  4. blacknole08 says: Apr 9, 2012 3:28 PM

    And, with all due respect to you Mr. Florio, I take issue with the phrase “Williams urging his troops.” He is not a general, he is (was) a NFL coach. At least generals have some honor and a bit of respect for their opponents, which Williams does not. Meanwhile, the real troops continue to fight for our freedoms overseas against people who actually want to do harm to us.

  5. nineroutsider says: Apr 9, 2012 3:30 PM

    Injury reporting should be changed, but not because of Williams…it’s a contact sport and guys go for weaknesses, if the league wants to truly protect players from injury list them like they do in hockey: lower body injury, upper body injury, head injury, etc. Harbaugh already does this to a certain extent; he’s about the tightest lip coach in the league on this stuff, worse than Belichick even.

    At least that leaves a little to the imagination. Why does anybody need to know if it is a plantar fasciitis or a hip flexor? Oh, Vegas lines!

    Like I said if the league really cares about protecting players adopt the hockey method of disclosing injuries.

  6. timtheenchanter1 says: Apr 9, 2012 3:30 PM

    Making injuries secret just creates cottage industry of spies working both for the gamblers and the teams to find out what the real injuries are.

    It’s bad enough that if the sharps get a bigger edge on gambling, and people start to see it as a bad bet, the league could lose some overall interest. But probably the biggest thing would be that some teams would invest in injury spies to get an advantage, thus forcing every other team to spend just to get back to a level playing field.

    And if Spygate taught us anything it’s that the league does not want a spending war over teams trying to get a competitive edge that just results in everyone spending more money to maintain something close to the status quo.

  7. gvicknair says: Apr 9, 2012 3:32 PM

    Who cares? If it keeps the players protected, I’m all for it!!!

  8. j0esixpack says: Apr 9, 2012 3:34 PM

    This will be an interesting test for Goodell.

    In the past we’ve seen a few coaches gain notoriety for their clear disdain for the coaching report. From both a health and strategic standpoint they have no interest in providing an invitation for teams to know who on the team is vulnerable.

    Goodell has fined coaches who dare put player safety ahead of gambling interests (or fantasy football I suppose)

    Will he continue to insist on disclosure or is it time to reform the rule?

  9. bennywisest says: Apr 9, 2012 3:37 PM

    Will it be like the Nhl injury reports? For those of you who don’t follow hockey “upper body injury” = concussion, “lower body injury” = everything else.

  10. saints25 says: Apr 9, 2012 3:38 PM

    @mjbulls45 <<< Exactly,Roger still has to get his cut from Veags so injury reports will never go away…

  11. nokoolaidcowboy says: Apr 9, 2012 3:41 PM

    We’re living in a very litigious society. Players, if not spouses will target the NFL because a main bread winners (*cough, meal tickets) ability to earn could be knowingly impacted by over zealous players or coaches.

    The game now faces the challenge of remaining competitive without going all “North Dallas Forty”.

  12. kungfubillysims says: Apr 9, 2012 3:48 PM

    Who dat bring shame and disgrace to the entire national football league?

  13. billsin20xx says: Apr 9, 2012 4:11 PM

    In hockey ‘upper body injury’ is officially any injury from the waist up, it could be wrist, finger, shoulder, ribs or concussion. ‘Upper body’ doesn’t always equal concussion so it might help a little.

  14. djaehne says: Apr 9, 2012 4:14 PM

    The rest of the NFL will follow the example already in place set by the Colts and Patriots…
    “we have no injuries to report”

  15. bertilfox says: Apr 9, 2012 4:24 PM

    Bill Belichick has long been derided for being obtuse regarding the Injury Report. This is the reason. There has to be a better way to thwart the gambling industry without declaring who the injury candidates are.

  16. pastabelly says: Apr 9, 2012 5:06 PM

    Belichick has been vague with respect to being specific about injuries. But he has complied with the whole probable/questionable status during the week. The Patriots never put in “we have no injuries to report”. Brady is always listed as probable.

  17. j0esixpack says: Apr 9, 2012 6:42 PM

    timtheenchanter1 says:
    Apr 9, 2012 3:30 PM
    Making injuries secret just creates cottage industry of spies working both for the gamblers and the teams to find out what the real injuries are.

    It’s bad enough that if the sharps get a bigger edge on gambling, and people start to see it as a bad bet, the league could lose some overall interest. But probably the biggest thing would be that some teams would invest in injury spies to get an advantage, thus forcing every other team to spend just to get back to a level playing field.

    And if Spygate taught us anything it’s that the league does not want a spending war over teams trying to get a competitive edge that just results in everyone spending more money to maintain something close to the status quo.

    ___________

    You’re correct that Goodell is working hard to make sure that all lucrative gambling interests have an even playing field.

    In the process he’s given the Gregg Williams of the NFL the information they need to hit the injured where they are most vulnerable.

    If Goodell wants to be on the record prioritizing gambling over player safety, he should continue the status quo – because that is his current policy.

    If player safety is more important than gambling revenue then we will likely see a shift towards the vaugue reporting of the NFL.

    Regarding your Spygate reference, Goodell was more upset that a coach would thumb his nose at a rule that allows taping from the stands but not from the sidelines.

    Belichick certainly does have a history of letting Goodell know when he thinks he’s full of @#$!. In the case of injury reporting, Belichick was right.

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