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10 things to know about the Vikings stadium situation

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With the situation in Minnesota going from simmer to full boil over the past few days, and with Commissioner Roger Goodell and Steelers owner Art Rooney II, chair of the league’s stadium committee, planning to meet with legislative leaders on Friday, now is as good a time as any to get up to speed regarding a controversy that could result in a relocation of the Vikings, only a year after the 50th anniversary of their arrival to the NFL.

So here are 10 things to know, in a question-and-answer format.  (Why do it that way?  Because we want to.)

What’s wrong with the Metrodome?

It has been regarded as a given for years that the Metrodome is outdated, and that it can’t be modernized in a manner that unlocks the high-end revenue streams that will keep the Vikings competitive with other franchises.  Even though the Vikings have used the 30-year-old stadium roughly 300 times, the team believes that renovation isn’t an option.  No effort to contradict that claim has ever gained any serious traction in Minnesota.

Didn’t I read last month about a deal to build a new stadium?

You did.  But the agreement for a “People’s Stadium” represented only an understanding between the team, Governor Mark Dayton, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak, and legislative leaders.  The deal calls for a $975 million facility, which would be built with $398 million from the state, $150 million from Minneapolis, and $427 million from the Vikings.  It still needs to be approved by the Legislature, and by the Minneapolis City Council.  For now, the proposed stadium bill died in a House committee on Monday night, and it has seen no progress at all in the Minnesota Senate.

The Vikings’ reaction to the current failure of the bill to even get a full legislative vote — the team says “there is no next year” — and the NFL’s direct involvement in negotiations represent a last-ditch effort to revive the deal that previously was reached.

What are the Vikings’ options?

If the stadium bill fails, the Vikings have to decide whether to try again, perhaps with a greater private contribution and/or a cheaper stadium.  If, as it appears, they aren’t inclined to try, owner Zygi Wilf can then try to move the team to a new city, sell the team to someone who would later apply for permission to move the team, or sell the team to someone who would keep the team in Minnesota.

Relocation could occur, with league approval, because the Vikings currently have no lease at the Metrodome.  In fact, if a decision to relocate after 2012 comes soon, the impact on the relationship between Minnesota and the Vikings could make it difficult for the Vikings and the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission to work out a one-year lease.  And no one at this point knows what would happen next.

Since there’s no lease, can the Vikings just pick up and move?

No.  Art Modell tried that in 1995, creating a huge mess that resulted in the Browns names and colors and records being left in Cleveland and a commitment to an expansion franchise.  The Vikings already are following the steps outlined in the league’s relocation policy, which requires a team to “diligently [engage] in good faith efforts” to “obtain a satisfactory resolution of its stadium needs” before informing the league of the existence of a “stalemate.”

The fact that the league directly is involved in the negotiations suggests that the Vikings have indeed informed the league that a “stalemate” exists.  If the situation can’t be resolved, the Vikings can then provide formal notice of an intention to relocate, sparking a process that could eventually culminate in a vote by the full ownership.  If 24 of the 32 owners agree, the move will be approved.

Along the way, the other owners would impose a transfer fee on the Vikings, which would be recommended by the Commissioner based on factors like the income streams in the new location, the income streams in the old location, the expenses in the new and old location, the differences between the new and old stadium, the demographics of the new and old markets.  It’s believed that a relocation to Los Angeles would result in a nine-figure transfer fee.

Would the Vikings leave behind the team name, logos, colors, and records?

Probably not.  As mentioned above, the deal to keep the Browns in Cleveland resulted from Art Modell’s unconventional, unilateral effort to move.  Also, the NFL planned to expand from 30 to 32 teams at the time the Browns moves to Baltimore.  The NFL currently doesn’t plan to expand, especially not in North America.

Most important, Minnesota wouldn’t get an expansion team without a new stadium.  And the reluctance to build a new stadium is what could cause the Vikings to leave.  So if they’re not going to build a new stadium now, there’s no reason to think they’ll do it later.

In other words, no matter how poorly the nickname may fit with the team’s next location, the Vikings will most likely remain the Vikings.

Why have the Vikings suddenly become so aggressive about possibly moving?

The Vikings had practiced patience for years.  Some think that the “Minnesota Nice” approach was selected under the theory that it would work better than a more blunt, matter-of-fact, anti-Field of Dreams “if you don’t build it, we will leave” strategy.  Others believe the Vikings simply wanted the media to do the team’s dirty work, reading the tea leaves and supplying the “or else” without the team having to do it.

The truth is that the language of the relocation policy, which expressly requires good-faith efforts to resolve the situation, forced the Vikings to try to get a new stadium deal without making threats or being unreasonable.  But to the extent that folks in Minnesota government believe that the Vikings haven’t taken a strong stand because they’ll eventually kick more and more (and more) money onto the table until the two circles of the Venn diagram kiss, a league source with knowledge of the dynamics explained to PFT on Thursday that Zygi Wilf, a successful real estate developer, can’t afford to cave when dealing with a public body; if he does, the public bodies with whom he routinely deals in other contexts will pounce on that high-profile show of weakness.

Why does the NFL build new stadiums with public money?

Because it can.

Some call it leverage.  Others call it extortion.  As NFL executive V.P. Eric Grubman told PFT Live on Thursday, the league regards it as competition.

Regardless, if one place won’t kick in significant public money to keep the NFL, someone else will kick in significant public money to get the NFL, either directly through cash contributions or indirectly through tax credits and other incentives.  Or through that Private Seat Licenses and/or higher ticket prices that a larger metropolitan area has the population density (i.e., enough really rich people) to support.

Notwithstanding the label applied, it’s a basic business reality of dealing with the most popular sports league in America.  With 32 teams and little or no chances at expansion, places that don’t have an NFL team but that want an NFL team will have to target an NFL team that already has a home.

Should public money be used to build NFL stadiums?

That’s for the people of a given city/state and their elected representatives to decide.  Public money gets spent on all sorts of things.  Sometimes, it’s a good investment.  Sometimes, it isn’t.

The presence of the NFL carries with it prestige and national legitimacy, along with an influx in local hotel, parking, and restaurant revenue on game days.  If that’s important to a given area and public money is necessary to make that happen, then the use of public money can be justified — especially if the facility will attract non-football events like concerts and conventions and a Final Four and other major activities.

Would a new Vikings stadium host a Super Bowl?

Probably, but the NFL can’t commit to that in advance.  Only the owners can award Super Bowls; that said, a habit has emerged over the past 35 years.  A new domed stadium (or an open-air venue in a warm-weather location . . . or New Jersey) results in a Super Bowl, if the city otherwise has the infrastructure to host the event (or, in the case of Jacksonville, even if it doesn’t).  The Metrodome hosted Super Bowl XXVI, the Silverdome and Ford Field in Detroit each got a Super Bowl.  Most recently, Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis hosted Super Bowl XLVI.

The money and the prestige coming from the hosting of a Super Bowl would help justify a large chunk of the public money devoted to the project, if the people in Minnesota choose to do that.

Where is this heading?

At this point, it’s unclear.  But the NFL and the Vikings will push for an answer now, before the current legislative sessions ends.  And the league and the team are prepared to interpret no answer as a “no” answer.

The biggest problem with the current deal arises from the effort to avoid the Minneapolis City Charter, which requires a public vote for any contribution in excess of $10 million to a sports facility.  The House committee that recently killed the deal was troubled by the apparent circumvention of the charter provision.  Even if the stadium bill becomes law and the Minneapolis City Council officially signs off on the plan, any taxpayer in Minneapolis could challenge in court the funding mechanism as a failure to comply with the charter.

And so, just as the Governor and the Mayor of Minneapolis and the legislative leaders underestimated the willingness of the Legislature to reject their deal now, the folks who came up with this plan possibly have given too little consideration to the possibility that a judge could kill it later.

The simple reality seems to be that the people in Minnesota either don’t want to kick in enough money to get it done, or they don’t realize that the NFL is serious about leaving.  If it’s the former, that’s their prerogative.  If it’s the latter, they need to wake up, now.

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Wednesday morning one-liners

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Bills RBs Fred Jackson and LeSean McCoy may end up splitting the third down work.

Free agent RB Stevan Ridley visited the Dolphins but didn’t reach a deal.

The Boston Globe has a detailed look at Robert Kraft’s testimony in the Aaron Hernandez trial.

Jets great Joe Namath visited the birthday party of 100-year-old twins.

Steelers great Rod Woodson is auctioning off some memorabilia.

The departure of QB Tyrod Taylor left the Ravens with a hole on the depth chart behind Joe Flacco, which led to the signing of Matt Schaub.

The Bengals would like to add a receiver in the draft.

Browns owner Jimmy Haslam’s truck stop company has settled four rebate fraud cases.

The Houston Chronicle thought it would be funny to run an April Fools article about J.J. Watt running for mayor.

Colts coach Chuck Pagano says of WR Andre Johnson: “He’s a big body guy that can still separate, create separation.”

Here’s a look at players the Jaguars might draft.

The Titans may be better off passing on Marcus Mariota.

The Broncos are expecting Bradley Roby to take a step forward this season.

Some possible options for the Chiefs in the draft.

Raiders DB Charles Woodson is promoting his line of wine.

Former Chargers LB Dwight Freeney says he was ripped off by Bank of America, to the tune of $20 million.

Here’s a scenario in which the Eagles could draft Marcus Mariota.

Giants QB Eli Manning is avoiding questions about his contract.

Cliff Harris, a great Cowboy of the 1970s, says when he thinks about today’s game, “I’m trying not to think about the eight to 10 million a year I would be making if I were playing today.”

Washington may try to draft the replacement for Brian Orakpo, who left for Tennessee in free agency.

New Bears RB Jacquizz Rodgers is an equally dangerous threat as a runner and receiver, with 1,116 career yards rushing and 1,104 receiving.

The Lions’ defense was good in coordinator Teryl Austin’s first season, but he expects it to be better this year.

Packers QB Aaron Rodgers is defending himself from people who think he shouldn’t be cheering for Wisconsin in the NCAA Tournament.

A year later, the Vikings say QB Teddy Bridgewater’s bad showing at his Pro Day didn’t matter at all.

The Falcons seem relieved that they got off easy for Noisegate.

A young Panthers fan who wants Cam Newton moved to running back has become an Internet sensation.

The Saints are taking a look at Miami Hurricanes LB Denzel Perryman.

The Bucs liked what they saw at Jameis Winston’s Pro Day.

Kentucky pass rusher Alvin Dupree could be a fit for the Cardinals in the first round.

Akeem Ayers and Jo-Lonn Dunbar will compete for a starting linebacker spot in St. Louis.

Here’s how the Seahawks’ starting lineup on defense looks right now.

Michael Wilhoite and Navorro Bowman look like the 49ers’ starting inside linebackers.

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Lions fine with DeAndre Levy walking on wings of airplanes

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Earlier this week, video of Patriots quarterback Tom Brady jumping off a cliff in Costa Rica made the internet rounds but he isn’t the only player to spend some portion of their offseason finding thrills off of the football field.

As mentioned in one-liners on Monday, Lions linebacker DeAndre Levy shared some pictures and video of his experience walking on the wings of a biplane. There’s a standard clause in player contracts that says players cannot “engage in any activity other than football which may involve a significant risk of personal injury,” but the team doesn’t have any problem with Levy’s new pursuit.

Lions president Tom Lewand said on Tuesday that the team’s official position was “don’t fall” and coach Jim Caldwell remained unfazed by the linebacker taking a mid-flight stroll.

“I think he was strapped in pretty well,” Caldwell said, via ESPN.com. “As a matter of fact, I just saw the photo for the first time. He’s that kind of individual. He’s afraid of nothing. He takes some pretty exotic trips in the offseason and as long as he’s coming back healthy, we’re going to pray for him. He’s an integral part of our team.”

Despite their accepting attitude, we imagine the Lions will ask Levy to fly inside the plane on road trips during the 2015 season.

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Miles Austin was finally healthy, right up until he wasn’t

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Miles Austin’s career has almost been defined by his injuries as much as his potential

But after changing his stretching routine and making some other changes, the new Eagles wide receiver finally seemed past a litany of hamstring and other soft-tissue problems.

Then he got shivved, for all practical purposes, suffering a lacerated kidney which landed him on the Browns injured reserve list.

“I felt healthy last year,” Austin said, via Geoff Mosher of CSNPhilly.com. “I don’t even know how you lacerate a kidney without stabbing yourself. I fell on my side really hard. I don’t know what happened. . . .

“I felt healthy last year with the routine I was going through before practice. I’m going to incorporate it into whatever is going on here. I know what helped me last year and that’s something I’m going to regardless always incorporate.”

Of course, Eagles coach Chip Kelly has a thing for damaged goods, and his magic sports science smoothies seem to be just the thing for players who come to him broken so he can make them whole.

If Austin can stay on the field, he has a chance to help the Eagles in some capacity. He said he didn’t know what his role would be, and hopes his experience makes up for the lack of pure speed he once had.

“I’m 30 now so I’m sure I’ve probably lost some bit of explosiveness from being 22 years old,” he said. “But I don’t think it’s that much. I feel good. I feel healthy.

“I feel like with a slight loss — maybe, potentially, I don’t know … even with slight loss of burst or whatever we were talking about — I think the fact that I know the game more I can still do what needs to be done, if that makes sense. I don’t feel like I’ve lost anything because I’ve gained things mentally.”

And as long as he can avoid any oddball injuries, hopefully he’s figured out how to keep his legs underneath him.

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Tony Romo would have taken a pay cut for DeMarco Murray

DeMarco Murray AP

The Cowboys weren’t going to pay DeMarco Murray what he thought he was worth.

But Murray’s friend Tony Romo said he was willing to take less than he was worth to keep him.

DeMarco ended up asking me, ‘Why don’t you take a pay cut?‘” Romo said on 105.3 The Fan in Dallas, via Todd Archer of ESPNDallas.com. “I was like, ‘I will. I will take a pay cut to go do this.’ I was like, ‘They’re going to restructure me and the whole thing,’ that’s the same thing in some ways just for salary-cap purposes. He was like, ‘OK, now we’re back to being friends.’ ‘You’re really worried about me? I would take $5 million less if it meant getting you back’. He knew that.”

If one of the conditions of friendship is sacrificing your own salary so someone else can get more, it might explain why I don’t have so many (OK, maybe that’s not the only reason).

But the Cowboys never asked Romo to move off the $17 million he’s due this year in any effort to keep the league’s leading rusher.

Instead, they stood on a four-year, $24 million offer to Murray, who eventually signed a five-year, $42 million deal with the Eagles.

That principle and fiscal responsibility is admirable, but it’ll be interesting to see if they value the running back position thus if, say, an Adrian Peterson became available.

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St. Louis County taxpayers won’t commit money to keep the Rams

Stan Kroenke AP

In what may be another step toward the Rams moving to Los Angeles, St. Louis County has said it will not devote $6 million of taxpayer money toward a new stadium.

With Rams owner Stan Kroenke planning to build a Los Angeles stadium, St. Louis officials are discussing a new stadium that would convince the Rams to stay. The current plan for a new stadium downtown has a budget of $985 million, so the $6 million that was planned to come from the county was a drop in the bucket. But the fact that one government entity is declining to fork over taxpayer funds is one more indication that this plan may not come to fruition in time to keep the Rams in town.

NFL owners have indicated that they expect to approve a plan for at least one team to move to Los Angeles soon. The top contenders are the Rams, Raiders and Chargers, with the Rams having a key advantage in that Kroenke can afford to build a stadium in Los Angeles with his own money, while Raiders and Chargers ownership would need to work out deals to finance the building of a stadium.

If the Rams do move, it’s possible that St. Louis could go forward with a new stadium plan — and try to convince the Raiders or Chargers to move to St. Louis.

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Robert Mathis still hopes to be ready by training camp

Robert Mathis AP

Indianapolis Colts pass rusher Robert Mathis suffered a bit of a setback in his recovery from a torn Achilles tendon that ended his 2014 season before it ever began.

But despite the difficulty with the injury, Mathis still hopes to be ready in time for training camp.

In an interview with Alex Marvez and Bill Polian on Sirius XM NFL radio, Mathis said he still anticipates being ready by July.

It’s not going as fast as I would like to but we are getting well and we should be clicking in camp. That’s my plan unless you’ve heard anything else,” Mathis said.

Marvez referenced Colts owner Jim Irsay’s comments from the league meetings in Arizona last week saying that Mathis may not be ready to play until November.

Mathis said he’s planning to be back much sooner than that.

“Yeah, very much so,” Mathis said. “I’m a competitor so if I can get out there with one Achilles, I’ll do it.”

Mathis had a career-high 19.5 sacks in 2013. However, a PED suspension due to fertility drugs forced Mathis to miss the first four games of the season. He then suffered the Achilles tear while working out on his own during that span and was lost for the year.

Mathis is now 34 years old and coming off a major injury. What he’ll be able to produce at this stage of his career will be a significant question mark.

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Dwayne Bowe plans a career revitalization

Na'il Diggs, Dwayne Bowe AP

Receiver Dwayne Bowe has said he plans to take his new team, the Browns, to the next level.  He also plans to get himself back to an old level.

With 13 total receiving touchdowns in four full seasons since catching 15 in 2010, Bowe plans to turn back the clock to an earlier phase of his career.

I have a chance to revitalize myself,” Bowe told Jeremy Fowler of ESPN.com.  “Just sit back and watch.”

Bowe believes a reunion with former Chiefs executive (now Browns G.M.) Ray Farmer will make it happen, based on film review conducted when Bowe visited the Browns in March.

“Him knowing what I can do, seeing me in practice, making crazy plays, splitting the safeties, he knows I still can do that,” Bowe said of Farmer.  “I couldn’t showcase that last year.  He was pulling up old plays, saying, ‘We are going to use you just like that.’  Moving around, going on motion, trying to hit the deep ball, trying to break plays.”  (Insert “and if it’s not working Farmer will text different instructions to the sideline” joke here.)

If all goes according to plan, Bowe can came up for some wasted years.  But he doesn’t view them as wasted.

“It’s been up and down, but it’s been fun,” Bowe said.  “I don’t regret nothing.  People can talk about the NFL and playing wide receiver — I feel I still have a good four more years in me.”

After scoring no touchdowns in 2014, the Browns would settle for one good year.  Or at least one touchdown.

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Popp hopes Michael Sam chooses CFL’s Alouettes

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The Montreal Alouettes hold defensive end Michael Sam’s rights in the CFL.  Their General Manager believes Sam may indeed choose to give Canadian football a try.

“The CFL is cut out perfectly for his style,” Popp told the Montreal Gazette.  “It would give him the opportunity to do what he does best.

“His agent knows.  They’re ready.  They know this may be what it is.  It’s Michael who has to make the decision — and he might never come.”

Popp is hesitant because it appeared in 2014 that Sam may join the CFL, but he didn’t.

“The indications were he was ready to come last fall, and he’s still not with us,” Popp said.  “So I really don’t know.  Seriously, I’d say our chances are 50-50.”

If Sam wants to play in the NFL, it should be more like 100-0.  Unwanted by the NFL after leaving Penn State in 2005, Cameron Wake went to the CFL, became a star pass rusher, signed with the Dolphins in 2008, and became a star pass rusher.

So if Sam is serious about getting to the NFL, Sam can show up for the Veteran Combine every year and wait for a call that’s never going to come, or he can go to the CFL and try to play his way to the NFL.  Of course, there’s a chance he may fail.  But if he’s determined to get to the NFL, that shouldn’t stop him from trying.

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Marcus Mariota also not attending the NFL Draft

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Following in the footsteps of Jameis Winston, Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota has also decided to forgo attending the NFL Draft on April 30.

According to Adam Schefter of ESPN.com, Mariota has elected to remain home in Hawaii instead of attending the draft in person in Chicago.

Per Schefter, Mariota feels it’s important for him, personally and culturally, to go through the experience at home.

Winston has elected to remain at home as well because his grandmother has type-2 diabetes and cannot travel to the event. With Mariota also electing not to make the trip, it could very likely mean the top two selections in the draft will not be in attendance to shake hands and provide a photo opportunity with Roger Goodell.

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Winston lacks no confidence

Jameis Winston AP

Questions remain regarding whether quarterback Jameis Winston will thrive at the next level.  But there should be no questions about his confidence.

Winston displayed that confidence after Tuesday’s Pro Day workout, in response to a question from Paul Burmeister of NBCSN’s Pro Football Talk.

“On Saturdays, right there on that field, you knew if you won or lost. Right here, it’s a little bit more difficult to tell.  Would you call today a win or a loss for you?” Burmeister said.

“It was difficult to tell if I won?” a perplexed Winston said.

“I thought it looked good,” Burmeister said.

“I know it looked good,” Winston said.  “I know that looked good.  If that was bad, I want to see everybody else Pro Day and I want me and you to sit down and watch what everybody else did and then watch what I did.”

Winston’s Pro Day was far from perfect.  He was grossly inaccurate with at least one swing pass that should have been easily on the numbers, given that he was throwing against air (and, at times, against broom).  But Winston sees it as perfect, or at a minimum as at least as good as anyone else’s.

That confidence can’t hurt him.  Still, it’ll be interesting to see how he deals with the inevitable adversity that every NFL player faces, at some point.  What will he say after throwing four interceptions and losing by 20?  How will he react to a three-game losing streak?

As with every other draft pick who ever was drafted, we won’t know how he’ll handle the next level until he gets there.

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Chargers sign guard Michael Huey

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Another of the NFL’s Veteran Combine invitees has found a job in the league.

The Chargers have signed offensive guard Michael Huey, the team said Tuesday. This is his second stint with the club; he spent time with San Diego in the 2011 preseason.

A Texas product, the 26-year-old Huey was with Washington’s practice squad in the second half of last season. His most extensive professional experience has come in the Arena Football League.

Overall, 105 players took part in the NFL Veteran Combine. In addition to Huey, three other Combine invitees have signed on with clubs: tight end Ifeanyi Momah (Arizona), wide receiver Nathan Slaughter (Arizona) and cornerback Deveron Carr (Indianapolis).

In other Chargers roster moves Wednesday, the club waived second-year offensive guard Jeff Baca and first-year nose tackle Chas Alecxih.

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Cardinals sign Chandler Harnish

Chandler Harnish Getty Images

The Arizona Cardinals have added an extra arm to their roster with Carson Palmer still recovering from an ACL tear.

The Cardinals signed former Minnesota Vikings and Indianapolis Colts quarterback Chandler Harnish to a one-year deal on Tuesday.

Harnish has not appeared in a regular season game in his three seasons since being “Mr. Irrelevant” in the 2012 NFL Draft. He spent five games on the Colts active roster in 2012 before being released and re-signed to the practice squad.

Harnish was released by Indianapolis at the end of training camp last season and signed with the Vikings. Harnish completed 53 percent of his passes for 283 yards with two touchdowns and an interception last year in Indianapolis.

Now Harnish reunites with Bruce Arians in the desert. He’ll get a chance to compete with Drew Stanton and Logan Thomas this offseason while Palmer continues to rehab from his knee injuries.

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Bears sign RB Jacquizz Rodgers

Jacquizz Rodgers AP

The Bears secured a contender for a reserve role in their backfield Tuesday, signing tailback Jacquizz Rodgers, the club said.

Rodgers, 25, has played the last four seasons with Atlanta, rushing 305 times for 1,116 yards and five touchdowns and catching 155 passes for 1,104 yards and five TDs. He has also returned 49 kickoffs for 1,177 yards.

Rodgers joins holdovers Ka’Deem Carey and Senorise Perry among the options behind featured back Matt Forte, who is one of the game’s most versatile and dependable players at his position. Nevertheless, the Bears could use a back capable of taking a handful of touches per game to reduce the hits Forte takes, and the 5-foot-6, 196-pound Rodgers will have a chance to compete for that job.

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Ravens get Schaub for a mere $2 million base deal

Schaub AP

Quarterback Matt Schaub has made plenty of money over the years for playing quarterback at a good but not great level.  In 2015, he’ll make pretty good money by, ideally, not playing at all.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, Schaub’s deal with the Ravens has a base value of $2 million, with $1 million to sign and a $1 million salary.  Contrary to a report that the deal is worth $3 million, the final $1 million comes from extra amounts — amounts that will be difficult for Schaub to earn if he’s not playing.

Given that Schaub will be backing up a guy who has started every game of his eight-year career, it’s unlikely that Schaub will unlock any payments based on playing time.

Based on the relative performances of Joe Flacco and Matt Schaub in recent years, the Ravens and their fans surely hope that won’t be happening.

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Report: Texans interested in Antonio Smith return

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The Raiders announced the release of defensive lineman Antonio Smith on Tuesday afternoon, clearing $4 million from their salary cap and taking another step away from a 2014 free agent class that failed to bring better results to Oakland.

Smith may not have to wait long to find a new place of employment. He also might not have to familiarize himself with a new city.

John McClain of the Houston Chronicle reports that the Texans are interested in bringing Smith back to Houston. Smith played in 79-of-80 regular season games for the Texans while he was a member of the team between 2009 and 2013 and he was productive in a fair number of them as the Texans advanced to the playoffs twice with Smith in the fold.

Smith has played inside and outside during his career, which would allow him to provide the team with solid depth behind projected starters J.J. Watt, Vince Wilfork and Jared Crick. Smith had three sacks and 20 tackles while starting all 16 games in his one season with the Raiders.

McClain suggests that the Broncos may also have interest in Smith now that former Texans head coach Gary Kubiak, defensive coordinator Wade Phillips and defensive line coach Bill Kollar are all in Denver.

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