Skip to content

Rookie wage scale shouldn’t lead to more trades, in theory

129662232_crop_650x440 Getty Images

Several reports have emerged in recent days regarding the belief that the new rookie wage scale will result in more trades at the top of the draft.

Perhaps those reports are originating with the various teams that desperately want to trade down.

The thinking is that the reduced financial commitment to top-10 picks will now make teams more willing to move up into what previously was a ridiculously high-rent district.  But the teams that hold those upper-echelon picks realize this, and they will value the picks accordingly for trade purposes.

And so, in order to move up for a player who’ll now get far less money, a team may have to dangle far more in order to make the trade happen.

Consider the trade that previously was consummated between the Rams and the Redskins.  To slide down only four spots from the No. 2 pick, St. Louis received the sixth overall selection, two more first-round picks, and a second-round pick.  Before the implementation of a real rookie wage scale, the Redskins would have had a hard time justifying the total investment of picks and cash needed to acquire and then to sign quarterback Robert Griffin III.

Thus, the money saved on the contract could translate to a higher price for the ability to pay a player less.  In the short term, there could indeed be more trade talks as the teams try to determine a fair price for these price-controlled elite picks.  In the end, it could be a wash, with no more and no fewer trades made.

Regardless, the fact that it’s now cheaper to sign top-10 picks won’t be lost on the teams that “earned” those selections.

Permalink 7 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Home, Rumor Mill
7 Responses to “Rookie wage scale shouldn’t lead to more trades, in theory”
  1. TaiwanMike says: Apr 22, 2012 12:27 AM

    The trades are what makes Draft Day interesting. The calling of the names is secondary to me, I want to see what teams do to get in position to be able to make the pick. Example: the Saints trading their entire draft to pick Ricky Williams was way more interesting than the actual pick.

  2. Soulman45 says: Apr 22, 2012 1:14 AM

    The Lions have a few of those pick that was precap it make it hard to meet the salary cap and get FA.
    I guess the Pats had the right idea trading back and saying away from the high price picks.

  3. 69firebird says: Apr 22, 2012 2:07 AM

    No, it’s just that the redskins are stupid. No one else will ever give that much up to move from 6 to 2. Desperate people do desperate things and Snyder is an idiot and now he has that rat shanahan helping to mess up that team

  4. marlin1894 says: Apr 22, 2012 4:40 AM

    Trades are fun. Atlanta last year made the draft infinitely more interesting.

  5. mikeyhigs says: Apr 22, 2012 7:22 AM

    The Redskins and Falcons have over inflated the market for 1st round draft picks. Teams will be reluctant to pay as much as they did to move up, yet teams tading the picks will want a similar bounty of picks in return.

  6. mjkelly77 says: Apr 22, 2012 10:11 AM

    The Redskins more than likely overpaid for the opportunity to draft griffin. But without the burden of a pre-CBA contract, griffin won’t hurt the Skins’ cap structure when he busts.

  7. drewbu22 says: Apr 22, 2012 10:35 AM

    “Before the implementation of a real rookie wage scale, the Redskins would have had a hard time justifying the total investment of picks and cash needed to acquire and then to sign quarterback Robert Griffin III.”

    Do you REALLY think that would have stopped the Redskins from making the deal?

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!