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Concussion cases will move slowly at first

Clay Redden AP

At some point, the news regarding concussion lawsuits filed by former players will shift from who’s joining the effort to whether the effort is actually moving toward a conclusion.

It could take a while.

Last month’s “initial organization conference” for the Philadelphia-based federal lawsuit in which a large number of the claims have been combined apparently devotes most of the remainder of the current year to the initial question of whether the claims against the NFL should be kicked out of court and resolved through the procedures set forth in the various labor contracts.

While the court order states that the NFL’s motion to dismiss the case will be considered on an expedited basis, the order also sets forth various deadlines indicating that the issue won’t be teed up for disposition by the court until late November, when the last written arguments are filed on the issue.

Meanwhile, more and more former players ultimately will sign up, either by adding their names to the mass litigation or by filing separate cases throughout the country, which the NFL will promptly attempt to move to federal court.  If successful, those claims will be added to the mass lawsuit headquartered in Philadelphia.

If not successful, the NFL will face multiple different legal fronts in various jurisdictions throughout the country, with dramatically increased expenses and obligations to provide evidence and testimony.

Ultimately, the NFL could face multiple trials.

Either way, these cases won’t be resolved any time soon.

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9 Responses to “Concussion cases will move slowly at first”
  1. canuck54143 says: May 7, 2012 9:00 AM

    How come we don’t hear about retired players bringing lawsuits against the NCAA for same thing? Even if they do win this lawsuit how can they prove it? Couldn’t the NFL just say they may have contributed to existing conditions from years of football played before they entered the NFL?

  2. feck12a says: May 7, 2012 9:10 AM

    this concussion mess is giving me a headache…

  3. lombardihero says: May 7, 2012 9:30 AM

    Concussion cases will move slowly at first (Nice Title) or at least till they get there memory back.

  4. nolarules says: May 7, 2012 9:42 AM

    And the only given we have is that the lawyers involved will make out like bandits as they spend years and tons of the former players’ and NFL’s money arguing whether it is just common sense or not that when you repeated fun your head at full speed into a wall that you might just get a concussion

  5. alewatcher says: May 7, 2012 9:53 AM

    Unfortunately, the NFL took a page from the tobacco industry playbook, and was in denial that football caused head injuries when all research indicated otherwise, which is a large part of the reason they’re being sued.

  6. mjkelly77 says: May 7, 2012 10:11 AM

    canuck54143 says:May 7, 2012 9:00 AM

    How come we don’t hear about retired players bringing lawsuits against the NCAA for same thing? Even if they do win this lawsuit how can they prove it? Couldn’t the NFL just say they may have contributed to existing conditions from years of football played before they entered the NFL?
    ____________________

    That’s because it’s all about money. You always stick your hand in the deepest pocket, in this case the NFL.

  7. olcap says: May 7, 2012 11:26 AM

    Do you really think the NFL’s protectors in Congress would allow this lawsuit to proceed in a court of law?

    This country’s number one, most prized and coddled entities are corporations, which is what the NFL is. The corporations (better yet if you’re a global one), are citizens too, you know. There’s no way the NFL will be left to defend themselves against lowly riff-raff. Never have, never will.

  8. shzastl says: May 7, 2012 1:56 PM

    “How come we don’t hear about retired players bringing lawsuits against the NCAA for same thing? Even if they do win this lawsuit how can they prove it? Couldn’t the NFL just say they may have contributed to existing conditions from years of football played before they entered the NFL?”
    —————————————-

    Proving that the NFL’s conduct was a “contributing factor” in causing the injury is all that’s required for liability, even if prior conditions also contributed. Suing the NCAA might require suing all the individual schools, college careers are shorter and thus exposure to the risk is shorter, and there might be a lack of evidence that the NCAA was aware of the risks to the extent the NFL was.

    “And the only given we have is that the lawyers involved will make out like bandits as they spend years and tons of the former players’ and NFL’s money arguing whether it is just common sense or not that when you repeated fun your head at full speed into a wall that you might just get a concussion”

    —————————————-

    these are contingency fee cases, the lawyers are taking a big risk of getting nothing.

  9. fumblenuts says: May 7, 2012 4:11 PM

    Like it or not, the NFL has the money and resources to drag this out in court for 20 years…………….

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