Johnny Jolly granted release after six months of six-year sentence

AP

A Texas judge has granted former Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly his request for early release, just six months into a six-year prison sentence.

The judge gave Jolly what is known as “shock probation,” which is granted when an offender convinces a judge that he was shocked into turning his life around by spending a short period of time in prison. Jolly will remain on probation for 10 years and will have to serve 200 hours of community service.

Jolly was arrested four times for illegal possession of codeine, and he has said that he battled an addiction to codeine since high school. He and his lawyer have also argued that he is merely an addict who has never hurt anyone other than himself, and that he doesn’t belong in prison with dangerous criminals. The judge evidently agreed.

The 29-year-old Jolly, who started every game for the Packers in the 2008 and 2009 seasons, has been indefinitely suspended from the NFL since 2010.

38 responses to “Johnny Jolly granted release after six months of six-year sentence

  1. It’s nice to see society is finally turnoing a corner in how addicts are being handled.

    Sitting in jail does no one any good, except judges, attorneys, prison guards, etc…

  2. Tell me how a drug addict like Johnny Jolly gets prison time but Donte Stallworth and Ray Lewis never see the inside of a jail cell?

  3. It would be a very good thing to see JJ get his act together,likeable fella for sure.I hope that he’s able to come back to football at some point if he desires.

  4. He will never play another down in football.. He is not a hardened Criminal the only person he has hurt is himself and his loved ones.

  5. I don’t feel sorry for the guy. He was a good player in a sport where even average players are paid half a million a year. He could have been retired by his mid-30’s and lived a life of luxury. He chose to throw it away.

    All that said, it’s idiotic that we’re paying for people to sit in prison because they abused prescription paid medication. Waste of money.

  6. Used to have faith he was going to be good. He let his addiction be his downfall. Wonder whether he’ll ever play another snap?

  7. Glad this judge had half a brain and realized that our overcrowded prison system doesn’t need more addicts filling up cells that could be used for kiddie diddlers like Sandusky. Chances are their drug of choice (or a jailhouse blend, anyway) is readily available and the problem would just continue when they got out. Having pulled many friends out of the abyss that is hard drug addiction, I can tell you that treatment is what an addict needs, not jail time. Hope he can stay on the straight and narrow and turn his life around.

  8. “who has never hurt anyone other than himself, and that he doesn’t belong in prison with dangerous criminals.” i think that accounts for about 90% of drug arrests…

  9. I suppose it’s one of those releases where only time will tell. Still he was carrying a drug around. Would a judge be so lenient if he was on heroin? Siizzurp shouldn’t be any different. And where did he get the prescriptions for it?

  10. The judge gave Jolly what is known as “shock probation,” which is granted when an offender convinces a judge that he was shocked into turning his life around by spending a short period of time in prison. Jolly will remain on probation for 10 years and will have to serve 200 hours of community service.

    Based on that pic, I have a pretty good idea of what “Shocked” him in prison

  11. It’s too bad he’ll never play in the NFL again. The man was a force on the field.

  12. He’s a non-violent offender. Don’t see the problem letting him out early. Save the prison space for the repeat violent criminals.

  13. The big guy clears one hurdle that I didn’t think he would. I hope he clears a few more and really does strighten out his life.

  14. 6 years for possession of codeine? No wonder the Federal government is broke. Jailing addicts is just horrible policy, no matter how mean spirited you are.

  15. Sounds good on the surface. “Drug addicts only hurt themselves”. You know, except the ones that lie, steal, and hurt others to get the money to buy their drugs, or just plain old assault somebody to steal drugs from them. Yep, prison is no place for somebody with “just” a drug addiction. I’m glad to see everybody here will welcome him into their neighborhood. Poor fella.

  16. It amazes me to this day that so few people have figured out that the “war on drugs” has been a complete and utter failure, has helped bankrupt the states and the Nation, has eroded our civil liberties and has destabilized most of Central and South America. Sell it, tax it, and use the proceeds to build treatment centers and get people off it. Would be the single greatest economic stimulus in US history and would be the one truly effective tool we ever tried in the “war on poverty”.

  17. It’s a good thing we all play by the same rules. It would be nice to know how much a ruling like that would cost to get out of, you know just in case us common folk get ourselves in the same amount of trouble!

  18. If he gets help and stays clean, this was a good move. Although I suspect he’s subject to some NFL suspension time (maybe it was last year), I hope he can get in shape, hook up with a team and turn his life around.

  19. Oh no, he was taking pills to feel good! As we all know, feeling good is illegal.

    We’re sending people to jail for SIX YEARS for taking pain pills? WTF is wrong with this country? That shouldn’t even be a crime, let alone a jailable offense.

    Some commenters have mentioned that some drug addicts have been known to commit other crimes. If that’s the case, then they deserve to be punished for those crimes just like anybody else would. But to assume that all drug users commit other crimes is ignorant and wrong. Maybe if drugs were legal like they should be, there would be less incentive to commit crimes to help obtain drugs.

  20. It’s amazing he got six years in jail for possessing something that’s legal in a ton of countries, you can buy the stuff in Canada without a prescription. He clearly wasn’t some kind of threat that society needed to be protected from, that’s what prisons are supposed to be for.

  21. A 6 year prison sentence for codeine?? My god. The United Police State of America reminds me more of the former Soviet Union everyday.

  22. Phone call for Johnny Jolly on line one, it’s Mike Brown calling.

    He wants to know if you’ll play for the league minimum.

  23. I hope he truly was “shocked” into turning his life around. I hope this wasn’t just a ploy, and he (and his lawyer) said the right things.

    He’ll never play in the NFL again. Even if he goes straight, he’ll have to do so for 2 or 3 years before the NFL will consider re-instating him. By that time, he’ll be too old for any team to want to take a chance on him.

  24. Sounds good on the surface. “Drug addicts only hurt themselves”. You know, except the ones that lie, steal, and hurt others to get the money to buy their drugs, or just plain old assault somebody to steal drugs from them. Yep, prison is no place for somebody with “just” a drug addiction. I’m glad to see everybody here will welcome him into their neighborhood. Poor fella.

    ————————————

    Of course they lie, cheat, and steal to pay the INFLATED prices from the black market. And those who actually do resort to such tactics are a SUBSET of the whole, and we do have the laws in place when they actually do harm life and property of others. We could wait until they actually commit a CRIME instead of a VICE that MIGHT lead one to a criminal activity.

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