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Johnny Jolly requests early release from prison

Johnny Jolly AP

Former Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly was sentenced to six years in a Texas prison just six months ago, but he is heading to court today asking to be released.

Jolly, who was arrested four times on charges related to illegal possession of codeine, is applying for “shock probation,” which in Texas is available to offenders who argue that the shock of spending some time in jail has been adequate to keep them on the straight and narrow. Jolly says he is simply an addict who needs treatment, not a danger to society.

“Once you get addicted to it, you’re in the mindset where you don’t think you going to get caught or you don’t feel like you’re going to get in trouble,” Jolly said, via KTRK in Houston. “And that’s just the drug talking to you.”

A 2006 sixth-round draft pick of the Packers, Jolly started all 32 games for the Packers in 2008 and 2009, but his drug arrests led to an indefinite league suspension. It’s unlikely that he’d ever play in the NFL again, although at age 29 he still has time to turn his life around and apply for reinstatement to the NFL, if he can get out of prison.

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35 Responses to “Johnny Jolly requests early release from prison”
  1. joetoronto says: May 15, 2012 9:43 AM

    “Ya, um…I’d like to get out early, please.”

    “No.”

    “Oh, OK, thanks.”

  2. rc33 says: May 15, 2012 9:44 AM

    Let him out.
    Dude has the most festive name in America.
    He should be working at Disney World or at minimum, Chuck E. Cheese.

  3. 2ndaryinsanity says: May 15, 2012 9:50 AM

    Jolly is a drug addict, not a violent criminal. Yes, he broke the law. But he needs treatment that won’t be provided in prison. I’d rather he get early release than for a dangerous criminal to be released back on the street due to over-crowding. I hope Jolly can get his life back on track.

  4. packerpride03 says: May 15, 2012 9:56 AM

    Johnny needs the shock of brining in prison. Guy had the world by the balls with the pack and threw it all away. Hope he can get clean and be a good person.

  5. sportsmeccabi says: May 15, 2012 9:56 AM

    Six years for that? Is that a joke? Who did he hurt besides himself?

  6. minnesotablizzard says: May 15, 2012 9:58 AM

    Sorry Johnny, Welcome to America; home of the rapidly growing prison industrial complex. Brought to you by for profit prison lobbies, the war on drugs, special interest groups, and the ability to make inmates work for slave labor wages while locked up and slap a “made in america” logo on the product. They aren’t there to rehabiliate non-violent drug offenders like yourself Mr. Jolly, they are there to make a profit off of you.

  7. ironhawk says: May 15, 2012 10:00 AM

    I’m beyond words that Texas understands that most prisoners are “scared straight” the first day in jail and don’t need to be in prison for ten years. Considering they execute mentally handicapped children for stealing candy I am a little shocked.

  8. franklamar17 says: May 15, 2012 10:00 AM

    I hope he turns his life around.i wish our justice system would treat people with addictions different and not spend money on locking people up for having an addiction.

  9. lks311 says: May 15, 2012 10:02 AM

    I think it’s interesting how perception trumps reality. The Packers have the same reasonable history of guys doing “questionable” things (Farvre, Chmura, Jolly…just off the top of my head) as much, if not mores, than teams like the Saints, Lions, Ravens, etc. Yet, they are never painted as a bad team. Let’s face it folks, football players are just people.

    Painting one group worse than another is just plain ridiculous.

  10. jodave5 says: May 15, 2012 10:10 AM

    The article says he was arrested FOUR times for the same thing. How many chances do you need before you realize the authorities are serious about this?

  11. buckybadger says: May 15, 2012 10:13 AM

    Is he a danger to society? Will the codeine problem in his home area become worse if he is out?

    If the answer is no then let him out on probation. If he screws up again you can throw the book at him but to keep him in jail [I doubt he is in prison] is just a waste of money and resources. If the answer is yes to the above questions then no he needs to sit longer. I am not involved directly so I can’t really say.

  12. brewdogg says: May 15, 2012 10:15 AM

    franklamar17 says: May 15, 2012 10:00 AM

    I hope he turns his life around.i wish our justice system would treat people with addictions different and not spend money on locking people up for having an addiction.
    ——————————

    He’s not in jail for having an addiction. He’s in jail for being stupid and committing illegal acts. He’s in jail for being in possession of enough of a drug to kill several zoos worth of large animals. He’s in jail for being in possession of a quantity that would indicate intent to distribute, or aiding a distributor.

    But I don’t fault him either. He honestly believed that, even if he got caught, nothing would happen. that’s what happens when you spend enough time in Green Bay as a Packer…… But outside of Green Bay, you’re just another person who actually gets punished for committing illegal acts.

  13. smchristensen says: May 15, 2012 10:24 AM

    If this goes through the Packer’s defense is going to be unstoppable!

  14. Steeley McBeam says: May 15, 2012 10:27 AM

    I went thru something like this a few years ago. I applied for “shock retirment” after the shock of my first week in the real world was adequite to know I wanted to be back in college.

    Good luck with that.

  15. kozmo50 says: May 15, 2012 10:27 AM

    Wow, my family and I feel so much safer now that this “dangerous” criminal is off of the streets!

  16. purpleguy says: May 15, 2012 10:31 AM

    If he hadn’t been busted four separate times I’d be more inclined to say get the guy some counseling and treatment rather than six years in the klink; however, I suspect after the second or third bust he was ordered into treatment and he didn’t take advantage of it. Now he knows that he’d better do so next time — I suspect that’s the “shock” he’s experiencing.

  17. conormacleod says: May 15, 2012 10:47 AM

    sportsmeccabi says:
    May 15, 2012 9:56 AM
    Six years for that? Is that a joke? Who did he hurt besides himself?
    ———————————————-
    First, he was arrested FOUR times. The authorities, and in particular the Judge, tend to get a little angry after you squander your first three chances. It kind of makes them look like fools for giving you those chances. Second, we really don’t know who he hurt, since the article doesn’t talk about all four arrests and how they happened. Did he steal the drugs from somebody who needed them? Did he commit other crimes in order to pay for them? We really don’t know. But, I bet you wouldn’t want him as a neighbor.

  18. toolkien says: May 15, 2012 10:47 AM

    Well, you gotta make room for Ryan Leaf. Of course the ironic thing is if both of them had just stuck to “jolly leaf” they’d have no problems…

  19. conormacleod says: May 15, 2012 10:49 AM

    kozmo50 says:
    May 15, 2012 10:27 AM
    Wow, my family and I feel so much safer now that this “dangerous” criminal is off of the streets!
    ————————————————-
    So you’re ok if the authorities put a half way house right next to yours for those people that ONLY have a drug addiction? I’m sure that none of those drug addicts hurt other people or commit other crimes in order to feed their addiction.

  20. naanunaanu says: May 15, 2012 10:54 AM

    lks311 says:
    May 15, 2012 10:02 AM
    I think it’s interesting how perception trumps reality. The Packers have the same reasonable history of guys doing “questionable” things (Farvre, Chmura, Jolly…just off the top of my head) as much, if not mores, than teams like the Saints, Lions, Ravens, etc. Yet, they are never painted as a bad team. Let’s face it folks, football players are just people.

    just of the top of my head i’d say you were an idiot.

    without a google search you can’t name more than 2 Ravens doing “questionable” things, or the Lions.
    i think you mean Saints, Bengals , and Titans,

  21. bmadccp says: May 15, 2012 10:55 AM

    minnesotablizzard says:
    May 15, 2012 9:58 AM
    “Sorry Johnny, Welcome to America”

    THANK YOU! I could never have said it better than you did. This country gets a little more corrupt each day, but the people making all the money have played their hands well…they have us all divided on basic issues to ensure we won’t recognize that they are enslaving us (either in jails or in debt). And if we do start to wake up and recognize it, they have us divided to the point where we can never do anything about it.

    Anyone who doubts the power of the private prison lobby or the true nature of the “war on drugs” is ill informed.

  22. dsimp724 says: May 15, 2012 11:01 AM

    Texas judicial system, I dont think i’d be asking for anything with the word shock in it

  23. purplehayseuss says: May 15, 2012 11:01 AM

    The arguments in favor of his release are sound. The justice system, however, is not; it is made of people that have to judge. They judged, in my opinion, to demonstrate that a pro athlete gets the same punishment as anyone else. They had to choose that way because of all the previous pro athletes that have skated on much worse because of their celebrity and money.

    Average citizens know well that big names and big wallets get off, while the rest of us get ‘justice’. Jolly is paying for that injustice.

  24. mialto says: May 15, 2012 11:02 AM

    I do feel bad for the guy after watching the reality TV show Curiosity where they experimented with drug addicts. These people truly believe that the drug is not affecting their decision making.

  25. bmadccp says: May 15, 2012 11:09 AM

    I worked in public service/safety for a very long time. I’ve seen it a hundred times…a person with low blood sugar drives and hits another car, or gets combattive with officers or medics, no crimincal charges are ever filed…the person has diabetes, a disease that can keep the mind from working properly. No reasonable person would hold a diabetic accountable for the things he does when his blood glucose level is 40 or 450.

    Addiction is a disease too, but people are most certainly held accountable for their behaviors while addicted.

    Some will argue that a diabetic has no choice and an addict does, that choice is the difference. And in some cases this may be true. Some people are predisposed to diabetes by genetics, BUT many people (knowing the long term risks) choose to eat poorly and not exercise, some people do CHOOSE diabetes.

    Any researcher will tell you that there is a genetic component to addiction as well. Do some people CHOOSE to do drugs? of course, it’s a choice to use. But addiction is not a choice, its a consequence (like diabetes is for some people).

    We are only slightly better than 1930’s China, where addicts were “treated” out back with a bullet to the head. We don’t kill them, we just cage them and hang a criminal record on them so they can’t get decent jobs or get college loans.

    The way America treats its people is pathetic and it is already coming back to haunt us. When you kick the dog too many times, the dog eventually gets pissed and rips your foot off. Putting a non-violent drug user in prison is more of a crime than the use of illicit substances is.

  26. Bar None says: May 15, 2012 11:12 AM

    @lks311 are you serious? You are comparing Favre getting addicted to the pain meds he was prescribed following and injury, Chmura being falsely accused of a crime, and Jolly being arrest for being addicted to a drug as being on par with Ray Lewis being accused of murdering someone? And I like that 2 of the cases you cite are over a decade old.

    What Jolly did was wrong, but he needs treatment not prison. And do we really want to get into who did what worse?

  27. hooks024 says: May 15, 2012 11:14 AM

    That’s the sad truth about the united states justice system. Treatment works, we just view drug addicts as any other criminal, and are quick to lock them up. I’m not defending every crack dealer out there, but people get hooked on scripts pretty easily. Keeps the likes of phizer and bms and such in business.

  28. thejuddstir says: May 15, 2012 11:31 AM

    Arrested after the first, second or third time should’ve been all the “shock treatment” a person needs. Funny how just 6 months in prison got him to quit acting like a stud and start wallowing like the punk he really is. First time offender I can understand giving a chance but Jolly was given a chance 3 previous times and never learned his lesson and it’s time to “pay the piper” Johnny.

  29. upyoursnfu says: May 15, 2012 11:36 AM

    Let’s just keep handing out second, third, forth, fifth, sixth chances….and so on.

  30. southballer says: May 15, 2012 11:48 AM

    To all of you saying he is just an addict and not a criminal, you have to look at this from a different point of view.
    I’m from Mexico and some of you have probably heard all the news about the horrible cartel wars currently going on all over the country and what you see on the news, is not even 20% of what is actually happening. Latin american countries are not drug consumer markets, USA is. Consumers in the USA may not be the ones killing innocent women and children south of the border, but they are the ones financing the monsters that actually do. And until people do not understand the real consequences of their “innocent” addictions, they need to pay in full for their actions, hope they make a true change in their lives and help stop this inferno the drug world is.
    You may not concur with what I just expressed and that is OK. I just wanted to put out there o point of view from this side of the sidewalk.

  31. lks311 says: May 15, 2012 11:49 AM

    naanunaanu says:May 15, 2012 10:54 AM

    lks311 says:
    May 15, 2012 10:02 AM
    I think it’s interesting how perception trumps reality. The Packers have the same reasonable history of guys doing “questionable” things (Farvre, Chmura, Jolly…just off the top of my head) as much, if not mores, than teams like the Saints, Lions, Ravens, etc. Yet, they are never painted as a bad team. Let’s face it folks, football players are just people.

    just of the top of my head i’d say you were an idiot.

    without a google search you can’t name more than 2 Ravens doing “questionable” things, or the Lions.
    i think you mean Saints, Bengals , and Titans,
    ______________________________
    And with that “handle” you call me an idiot? My point is that comments abound about the bad culture of teams (let’s take the Ravens out of it, if it eases the sensitivity) being painted as bad because of the mistakes of a few and yet the Packers—and other orgs get a pass. No organization is all bad and no org is all virtuous.

    And as far as former Packers—who gets in a hot tub with teenagers (Chmura) and Farvre’s sloth like behavior with women goes back to his Packer days. Just covered up because he was an Icon in sleepy Green Bay. I forgot about the painkillers. Thanks for the reminder.

  32. minnesotablizzard says: May 15, 2012 12:26 PM

    southballer says:
    May 15, 2012 11:48 AM
    To all of you saying he is just an addict and not a criminal, you have to look at this from a different point of view.
    I’m from Mexico and some of you have probably heard all the news about the horrible cartel wars currently going on all over the country and what you see on the news, is not even 20% of what is actually happening. Latin american countries are not drug consumer markets, USA is. Consumers in the USA may not be the ones killing innocent women and children south of the border, but they are the ones financing the monsters that actually do. And until people do not understand the real consequences of their “innocent” addictions, they need to pay in full for their actions, hope they make a true change in their lives and help stop this inferno the drug world is.
    You may not concur with what I just expressed and that is OK. I just wanted to put out there o point of view from this side of the sidewalk. ==========
    The problem is prohibition doesn’t work! That’s why a bunch of former world leaders and especially from central and south America are calling for the legalization to stop the violence. Look at Portugal, legalizing drugs WAS the answer!!

  33. nolarules says: May 15, 2012 12:57 PM

    All of your preaching that he should be let out after being given three chances before should offer to have the half way house he would be released to place right next to your house. or are most of you the “not in my back yard” types?

  34. rajbais says: May 15, 2012 3:19 PM

    Why did they take my damn post down???

    Talking about prison lobbies influencing governments to Jolly in jail longer is wrong???

    What the hell kind of country do I live in???

    Watch, MDS will get the prison lobby to throw me in jail for pointing out what the prison lobby does!!!

  35. theawkwardyears says: May 16, 2012 3:20 AM

    The Packers still own his rights. If Vick is allowed a second chance for hurting living creatures this guy should be allowed a shot when he only hurt himself.

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