Skip to content

“Due justice” could be coming in bounty case, but not on Monday

Roman+Harper+New+Orleans+Training+Camp+reFDecX-GFdl Getty Images

The question of whether justice is done depends largely on the perspective of the person who is seeking it.  Rarely, if ever, do both sides of a dispute embrace the outcome crafted by a third party.

In the case of the players suspended for allegedly participating in, funding, and/or establishing the Saints’ alleged bounty program, the fact that one of the two parties will also be resolving Monday’s appeals makes it even harder for the other party to be confident that the outcome will resemble anything remotely close to justice.

Saints safety Roman Harper nevertheless remains hopeful that, eventually, justice will be served.  “I know what really went down in our locker room, and I know the things that got hit on us are nowhere near what they’re supposed to be,” Harper told Alex Cassara of the New Orleans Times-Picayune.  “That’s my only comment on it, but I know due justice will eventually happen.”

It likely won’t happen at 345 Park Avenue on Monday, when Commissioner Roger Goodell begins the process of taking a second look at the player suspensions he already has imposed.  Though it’s possible that he thumbed the scale the first time around in order to appear open-minded and merciful by reducing the suspensions after further review, the four players believe there should be no suspensions, fines, or any other penalties.

Unfortunately, they likely won’t have a full and fair chance to attempt to establish their innocence on Monday.

“I don’t know any part of our government where you can punish somebody and then not say what you’re punishing them for or what you’ve got against them,” Harper said, after being informed of the evidence that the league plans to use.  “I just don’t know anywhere in America where that’s justice.”

The league will call it justice, because for the NFL justice consists of being the ultimate authority on all matters relating directly or indirectly to its business.  True justice entails a neutral, objective party getting to the truth, especially where as in this case the truth is hotly contested.

As to Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma, Saints defensive end Will Smith, Packers defensive end Anthony Hargrove, and Browns linebacker Scott Fujita, something they regard to be justice likely will have to come in some other setting.  In a controversy that entails plenty of questions and ambiguities (and precious few answers from the league), the only thing that appears certain at this point is that the players certainly won’t have a full and fair chance to prove that their version of the events is the correct one on Monday.

Permalink 18 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Cleveland Browns, Green Bay Packers, Home, New Orleans Saints, Rumor Mill
18 Responses to ““Due justice” could be coming in bounty case, but not on Monday”
  1. SeenThisB4 says: Jun 17, 2012 11:50 AM

    The decision on Monday’s appeals will be swift and decisive, especially since it has already been typed and printed: Appeals denied, penalties will be enforced as previously announced.

  2. sportmentary says: Jun 17, 2012 11:50 AM

    Every week we have the unfortunate experience of reading Florio defend scumbag players. I’m sick of that.!

    The NFL is not the government and not the law. It is a private business that has the right to govern their affairs as they see fit.

  3. h3min1230 says: Jun 17, 2012 11:51 AM

    I’ve always wondered how Roman Harper has all that white hair when he’s not even 30 yet.

  4. daknight93 says: Jun 17, 2012 11:56 AM

    This bounty drama will be over this week when Goodell listen to what the players have to say Monday, then Goodell will take a few days and reject appeals and suspensions will stand…Hail Godell…Judge, Jury and Executioner…All suspensions stand, there’s no fair due process in a nfl court…it’s time to move on!

  5. stew48 says: Jun 17, 2012 12:06 PM

    How does that go? The ending is: absolute power corrupts. And, whether the NFL defenders and player haters like it, that is exactly where Goodell is now. Further, haters, don’t think for a minute that the players are not protected regarding justice in the U.S.A.

  6. gadgetdawg says: Jun 17, 2012 12:15 PM

    On Monday the players involved will receive ‘justice’ by the procedures their union negotiated. I feel no pity.

    Maybe had they pushed those issues instead of pushing to neuter the offseason then they might be happier.

  7. cletusvandam says: Jun 17, 2012 12:26 PM

    “I don’t know any part of our government where you can punish somebody and then not say what you’re punishing them for or what you’ve got against them,” Harper said
    First the NFL isn’t part of the government it’s a business. Second if the players didn’t think that one man (the commissioner) having sole power was a good idea (it really isn’t) why did they argee to it in the CBA they just signed off on?

  8. brenenostler says: Jun 17, 2012 12:31 PM

    The NFL doesn’t need evidence. If there wasn’t a bounty system, Sean Payton and Gregg Williams would have denied it when all this first broke out.

    If Vilma is allowed to play this year, what’s that going to say about the NFL’s ability to protect its players?

  9. ksm31311 says: Jun 17, 2012 12:38 PM

    All of you people complaining about due process and the fact that Goodell has all of this power need to focus your hate towards the NFLPA who accepted this in the CBA negotiations…

  10. mitchdms says: Jun 17, 2012 1:14 PM

    Everyone deserves fair treatment. Just because Goodell has the authority I punish with limited evidence doesn’t make it right. One would hope, with such great responsibility, he would show the world that he will be a fair arbiter and instill confidence in the league. 4 quick hearings in a day containing one-sided evidence that doesn’t even support public accusations isn’t doing that for people who are honest with themselves.

    Declaring guilt to the media without giving the players a chance to explain, punishing based in what we know was questionable evidence, and overseeing an appeal while withholding exculpatory evidence and testimony cannot be seen as fair by any logical person.

    Finally, “he doesn’t need any evidence” is a pretty terrible thing for anyone to believe and support, especially based on lack of denials when you have no idea I what was and wasn’t said outside of the view I the media.

  11. vdogg says: Jun 17, 2012 2:20 PM

    At what point did this whole bounty thing come up for debate? The coaches have admitted it happened, the guy responsible for setting it up in multiple teams has admitted it as well…..where did this become foggy? The tapes have players barking for money, the game film shows proof….why are these a*holes crying for their day in court? You did it, there’s proof you did it, now just be men and take the punishment….!

  12. mjkelly77 says: Jun 17, 2012 5:06 PM

    The players signed a CBA giving the Commissioner sole discretion in judgement and meting out any resultant punishment. And he did so. GUILTY. Serve your time and quit whining like the little girls that you are.

  13. daveman8403 says: Jun 17, 2012 9:25 PM

    mjkelly77 says:
    Jun 17, 2012 5:06 PM
    The players signed a CBA giving the Commissioner sole discretion in judgement and meting out any resultant punishment. And he did so. GUILTY. Serve your time and quit whining like the little girls that you are.

    ———————————————————————————————————

    I am sure you would just sit idlely by and be suspended without pay for a year if you were innocent? get out of here.

    Yea, let’s just let Goodell do whatever he wants and let him be beyond all reproach. I don’t care what the CBA says, that doesn’t mean you don’t hold him to a certain standard.

  14. thejuddstir says: Jun 17, 2012 11:45 PM

    mjkelly77…….”I am sure you would just sit idlely by and be suspended without pay for a year if you were innocent? get out of here.
    Yea, let’s just let Goodell do whatever he wants and let him be beyond all reproach. I don’t care what the CBA says, that doesn’t mean you don’t hold him to a certain standard.”
    ————————————————–
    You may not like Goodell’s decision and while I disagree with you, I respect your “opinion”. BUT, you are being even more ridiculous than what you are claiming Goodell to be. At least Goodell has seen documentation before making his decision, you are simply presuming that these players are “innocent”. That’s crazier than what you are accusing Goodell and the NFL of doing. You obviously are a Taints fan as you “don’t care what the CBA says”……it simply says what the players agreed to abide by , so why now should they not be expected to abide by it????? In short, your post is completely asinine.

  15. fusion3450 says: Jun 18, 2012 12:52 AM

    vdogg says:
    Jun 17, 2012 2:20 PM
    At what point did this whole bounty thing come up for debate? The coaches have admitted it happened, the guy responsible for setting it up in multiple teams has admitted it as well…..where did this become foggy? The tapes have players barking for money, the game film shows proof….why are these a*holes crying for their day in court? You did it, there’s proof you did it, now just be men and take the punishment….!
    ——–
    with as long as this has been going on i cannot believe how many people still don’t know facts, only what they believe. who admitted what exactly genius? come on……..waiting……maybe go back and READ facts

  16. cssaint78 says: Jun 18, 2012 11:44 AM

    It’s sad, and evidence of how well the NFL played the media, that people still don’t understand that the players, coaches, and GM did NOT admit to a bounty system. They admitted to a pay for performance system where they rewarded clean hits. There’s is a HUGE difference between the two. Reading the comments it’s evident that the general public is completely oblivious to the details of the case.

  17. cssaint78 says: Jun 18, 2012 11:45 AM

    fusion3450 says: Jun 18, 2012 12:52 AM :

    with as long as this has been going on i cannot believe how many people still don’t know facts, only what they believe. who admitted what exactly genius? come on……..waiting……maybe go back and READ facts

    You said it man. People are completely clueless on this one, and the NFL wouldn’t have it any other way.

  18. cssaint78 says: Jun 18, 2012 11:48 AM

    “At what point did this whole bounty thing come up for debate? The coaches have admitted it happened, the guy responsible for setting it up in multiple teams has admitted it as well…..where did this become foggy? ”

    The players and coaches admitted they had a pay for performance system in place, wherein they rewarded CLEAN hits. You know nothing about the case, so don’t purport to be an expert. It became foggy at the very outset of the controversy because the NFL purposefully tuned and worded the case to make it that way. Reporters didn’t even start asking questions until weeks and months later, and by then you had the “facts” in your head.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!