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Fujita to Goodell at appeal hearing: “What the hell are you doing, Roger?”

Roger Goodell AP

Lawyer Peter Ginsberg wasn’t the only one who had tough words for Commissioner Roger Goodell at Monday’s appeal hearing in the bounty case.  Browns linebacker Scott Fujita was far more brief, and far more pointed.

“I saw [Goodell] in the [appeal] hearings and he offered to shake all of our hands,” Fujita told Dave Zirin of SiriusXM Radio’s Edge of Sports Radio, via SI.com.  “Some of the other players didn’t, but I went ahead and shook his hand, and I just said to him, ‘What the hell are you doing, Roger?‘”

How did the Commissioner respond?

“He had nothing to say,” Fujita said.  “His face sure turned red, though.”

So much for the draft-night man hugs.

Fujita also addressed the merits of the situation, echoing the notion that the Saints had a pay-for-performance system coupled with tough talk but no deliberate intent to injure.

“I know exactly what [happened] and what didn’t,” Fujita said.  “The problem with this whole thing is that it’s just an unfortunate situation where you have a defensive coordinator [Gregg Williams] who I like a lot, but said a lot of really vulgar, inappropriate, outlandish things.  You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing — and it becomes a perfect storm, and also it comes at a time politically when I think the league was looking for something like this.

“So, it’s unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that a lot of players have been dragged into it when the reality is it’s just a kind of loose, joking around, performance-type system of motivation coupled with some really, really inappropriate language that I’m sensitive to, but again, it is just language.”

Fujita apparently wants the NFL to focus on what the program was, and to clarify what it wasn’t.

“People said I was stupid for confessing to paying for big plays.  I didn’t think of that as a big deal,” Fujita said.  “Is it against the rules?  Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules, but that’s the way it was done when I was a young player and I’m not ashamed of that.  If that’s what I’m going down for, let’s call it for what it is.  The problem is that the league has billed this thing as being this super-organized pay-to-injure scheme, which it never was.

“Now, it turns out when the evidence is getting released that there is actually very little to nothing on anything pay-to-injure related, especially as it pertains to me.  So, again, if it’s pay-for-performance, let’s call it what it is, and if I have to take my medicine for that, I’ll do that, and we’ll move on, but that’s not what the league has billed this as.”

Fujita explained that the issue is about more than the money he’ll lose during a three-game suspension.

“Another thing I have a hard time with is that a lot of people just say, ‘You only have a couple games [suspension].  Just be glad with what you got.  Stop complaining and move on.’  It’s more than just a couple games,” Fujita said.  “My reputation is a lot more valuable to me than three game checks.  So for someone to say ‘just take your medicine and move on,’ my response is no.  If you’re accused of something you didn’t do, and they were going to not only ruin your reputation, but also take a lot of money away from you, you would not just lie down.  So it’s troubling.  It’s been hard for me.  It’s been a stress at home.  I’m lucky to have such a supportive family with young kids who don’t understand any of this kind of stuff so that brightens my day, but it has been very hard for me.”

The good news is that the discussion of the actual or perceived flaws in the NFL’s investigation could be prompting the league to focus on precisely why the players are being disciplined — for contributing to and participating in a pay-for-performance system that created an incentive to inflict injury on opponents (regardless of whether they actually did) and not for deliberately attempting to inflict injury in exchange for cash.

The bad news is that it’s too late to put the bounty toothpaste back in the tube.  The Saints were painted as a marauding gang of Gilloolys in March; calling it what it really was in June will do nothing to change the perception that has been cemented into the public’s collective consciousness.

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139 Responses to “Fujita to Goodell at appeal hearing: “What the hell are you doing, Roger?””
  1. akhhorus says: Jun 22, 2012 8:53 PM

    Then file a CBA grievance if the evidence is this weak.

    And maybe the coaches/FO personnel confessing/admitting to the existence of the bounty program is why the Saints have been “painted” as this rogue team, no? I don’t get why the players is fighting something that Williams openly confesses to and Peyton confirms. Would anyone believe anyone saying that Sandusky didn’t molest those kids?

  2. butthatmakestoomuchsense says: Jun 22, 2012 8:57 PM

    So for someone to say ‘just take your medicine and move on,’ my response is no. If you’re accused of something you didn’t do, and they were going to not only ruin your reputation, but also take a lot of money away from you, you would not just lie down.

    Beautifully said.

  3. patsaintsbroncoscheat says: Jun 22, 2012 8:58 PM

    What is this guy complaining about? He admitted it was against the rules. A complete violation and he thinks Goodell should let him off the hook. You know what you did was illegal pipe down and pay for your transgression. He paid for big plays. Plain and simple pay for your crime.

  4. voicefreason says: Jun 22, 2012 8:58 PM

    Whatever dude, you had bounties, you tried to injure. Why don’t you just rewatch the tape. Man-up and take your lickings instead of trying to hide all this in litigation. Saint’s cheated and for that they have an Empty Title. Live with it.

  5. denverdave3 says: Jun 22, 2012 8:59 PM

    I say Goodell is right on. Get rid of half these spoiled gang bangers. If you want to be a multimillionaire at the expense of hard working fans then act like somebody with class, not a hood.

  6. clickablecontent says: Jun 22, 2012 9:00 PM

    “You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing…”

    And there is the rub: Non-contract bonuses violate league rules. Here is Fujita publicly admitting to it. This is a suspension. Simple.

    Has everyone lost sight of that amidst all this bounty business?

  7. wherezwaldo says: Jun 22, 2012 9:02 PM

    I think a bounty was just placed for Godell’s head.

  8. dynastydriven says: Jun 22, 2012 9:06 PM

    Goodell is simply out of control, he’s going too far with almost every single disciplinary decision.

    Rodger needs to remember without these players he’s got no job.

    Tone it down big guy, let that ego of yours go on a little diet

  9. marionbarber24isgod says: Jun 22, 2012 9:07 PM

    This is a classic case of not being man enough to do the time for the crime. What you did was wrong, and you have lied about it during the investigation. Roger has my full support in punishing the players and preventing this from ever happening again.

  10. commonsensedude says: Jun 22, 2012 9:08 PM

    Another day in the tenure of Roger Goodell, another drama. The NFL could make a lot more money if they kept a bunch of cameras at the NFL headquarters and turned it into a reality show. I can imagine it now: “Keeping Up With The Commissioner”

  11. SeenThisB4 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:10 PM

    “I don’t get why the players is fighting something that Williams openly confesses to and Peyton confirms. ”

    Because sometimes, a rose, is not always, a rose.

  12. mjkelly77 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:11 PM

    “So, it’s unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that a lot of players have been dragged into it when the reality is it’s just a kind of loose, joking around, performance-type system of motivation coupled with some really, really inappropriate language that I’m sensitive to, but again, it is just language.”
    __________________

    Tell that to the widow of Darryl Stingley.

  13. geefan1 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:12 PM

    Way to throw your coach under the bus there, Scott.

  14. sgtr0c says: Jun 22, 2012 9:14 PM

    He admits money was exchanged for hits, quoted…………….

  15. dontouchmyjunk says: Jun 22, 2012 9:14 PM

    Sorry, Scott. Your argument is weak.

  16. Deb says: Jun 22, 2012 9:15 PM

    The film should tell the tale on the players. If they weren’t flagged and fined for dirty hits then, the NFL has no case against them now. The coaches/GM were punished for organizing the bounty program. That should be the end of it. The league has no reason to pursue the Saints players.

  17. wunsa says: Jun 22, 2012 9:15 PM

    akhhorus says:
    Jun 22, 2012 8:53 PM
    Then file a CBA grievance if the evidence is this weak.

    And maybe the coaches/FO personnel confessing/admitting to the existence of the bounty program is why the Saints have been “painted” as this rogue team, no? I don’t get why the players is fighting something that Williams openly confesses to and Peyton confirms. Would anyone believe anyone saying that Sandusky didn’t molest those kids?
    ____________________________

    One more time because some of you apparently are slow learners…

    AT NO TIME HAS ANY SAINTS COACH OR PLAYER ADMITTED TO A BOUNTY PROGRAM.

    PFP – yes, PFI-no.

    If you think I’m wrong prove it.

  18. nyyjetsknicks says: Jun 22, 2012 9:15 PM

    We have evidence and players admitting to pay for “big plays”. Sounds to me like players golf games are about to improve.

  19. FinFan68 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:16 PM

    Not a smart way to talk to the Commissioner. Especially since he is the guy you are trying to get to change his mind on your punishment, no less.

    These guys are about public perception just as much as the league is and their statements are nothing more than PR moves. They did something “detrimental to the league” and got punished for it. We all should know that. It does not matter if you or I can consider their actions a “bounty”. What they have admitted to (and Fujita just did it again as quoted in the article) falls under that clause in the CBA and the only opinion that matters is Roger Goodell’s–because that’s what the players agreed to in the CBA. Maybe the punishment is a bit harsh if you view their actions on the low end of the sliding scale, but there is no doubt that they did something (in some cases several somethings) wrong.

    BTW, “marauding gang of Gilloolys”…really?

  20. samel2003 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:17 PM

    “Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules, but that’s the way it was done when I was a young player and I’m not ashamed of that.”

    This is a PRIME example why, if you are charged with anything, be it criminal or anything else, you don’t speak anything, no matter how innocuous it seems at the time. You have hired counsel who Should be your advocate.

    To be clear, if the nfl can penalize players WITHOUT proving an intent to injure, two things become evident. First, fujita admitted guilt under that rubric. Second, and more importantly, because this has been happening “when [he] was a young player,” he may have just sparked a new, covert investigation into the former head coaches and defensive coordinators for fujita’s previous teams. That includes the Kansas City Chiefs from 2002–2004, the Dallas Cowboys in 2005, and maybe the Cleveland Browns.

    Stay tuned. Same bat time, same bat issue.

  21. kilo0986 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:20 PM

    And to think that Goodell was once regarded as the commissioner who “gets the game”.

  22. staffordsyear says: Jun 22, 2012 9:21 PM

    Good for him.

  23. youarewrongandthisiswhy says: Jun 22, 2012 9:21 PM

    Nobody cares about Scott Fajita… except Scott Fajita.

  24. nflpasux says: Jun 22, 2012 9:21 PM

    Idiot! Just take your medicine like a man and stop further embarassing yourself by whimpering like a schoolgirl!

  25. buzzardpointlookout says: Jun 22, 2012 9:21 PM

    Here’s to hoping this puts an end to GODell’s reign as commissioner and that the NFL goes back to being a football league instead of a ridiculous sideshow.

  26. pjgrannan says: Jun 22, 2012 9:24 PM

    “Now, it turns out when the evidence is getting released that there is actually very little to nothing on anything pay-to-injure related, especially as it pertains to me. So, again, if it’s pay-for-performance, let’s call it what it is, and if I have to take my medicine for that, I’ll do that, and we’ll move on, but that’s not what the league has billed this as.”

    This is one of the most measured and intelligent takes on the issue that I have read.

    BTW – if you read the Williams “confession” it refers to a “pay for performance” program. I have not seen anything from a Saints player or coaches that when actually examined is a confession to “pay to injure.”

  27. trooper586 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:24 PM

    You start off a conversation with a cop “what the hell did you stop me for”….guess what?? you’re getting a ticket!!

  28. nerdyturdy says: Jun 22, 2012 9:33 PM

    Fujita:

    ”The problem with this whole thing is that it’s just an unfortunate situation where you have a defensive coordinator [Gregg Williams] who I like a lot, but said a lot of really vulgar, inappropriate, outlandish things. You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays…”

    So the things were not vulgar at the time, they were pre-game pep talks which inspired people to make “big plays.” These vulgar statements were cheered at the time as inspiration, but not now, right Fujita? You sir, are a big, fat, liar!

  29. easyeddie says: Jun 22, 2012 9:37 PM

    dynastydriven says:
    Jun 22, 2012 9:06 PM

    Rodger needs to remember without these players he’s got no job.
    —————————–

    Without Fujita, Vilma and Hargrove Rodger has no Job? That’s rich.

  30. minnesotablizzard says: Jun 22, 2012 9:37 PM

    Maybe we should start looking at the corporations that sponsor the NFL and not question if they wouldn’t love to completely influence America’s favorite/most watched game..if they influence politicians, why wouldn’t they influence the NFL?

  31. cwwgk says: Jun 22, 2012 9:41 PM

    Why didn’t he present this testimony on Monday? The players have been real good at complaining to the press. But when it’s been time to act like grown ups in the real world regarding this issue they either can’t or won’t.

    Can’t wait until they try this act with the judicial system. Thumb your nose at the very collective bargaining agreement to which you agreed? Refuse to participate in the disciplinary process and then complain about the outcome? Act in a hostile fashion to the person you agreed to preside over your appeal? Oh yeah, judges adore litigants who behave like that.

  32. hirshologist says: Jun 22, 2012 9:41 PM

    I might be on an Island for this, but I am completely on Roger Goodell’s side.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think we’ve seen enough evidence that some of these players put down money to other players to get hurt.

    There was a slide showing Vilma put 10,000 for “QB Out.”

    Whether you paint that as “pay-for-performance” or “Pay-for-injury” is nothing more than semantics. BTW, how is contributing money to a fund that watches an opposing player get hurt not “Pay-for-Injury?”

    I need Scott Fujita to sit down and explain that rather than struggle to give vague public statements.

    Unless Jonathan Vilma (not his lawyers) says publically and point-blank, “Greg Williams lied and made that up,” the NFL has met its burden of proof.

    I do think the punishments are unfair in that these players aren’t the only ones who participated in this kind of behavior. It’s part of the culture of the NFL. And I completely understand that these players are being singled out as the bad guys.

    However, it is Goodell’s responsiblity to protect the NFL and change that kind of culture. And it just so happened that these guys were the ones that were caught.

    Personally, I think it’s un-manly that players want to win games by seeing their opponents get hurt. As a fan, I want my Eagles to beat their opponents when they are at their best. I want to be the Dallas Cowboys with Tony Romo at quarterback, not Kyle Orton.

  33. xtutx says: Jun 22, 2012 9:42 PM

    Fujita said. ”Is it against the rules? Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules

    What are we talking about then?

    It’s all a part of the big picture and lawsuits against the NFL. They are getting sued because people are claiming to be injured long-term. This is yet another angle to sue the league, so they step in to squash it to protect themselves.

  34. gbmickey says: Jun 22, 2012 9:43 PM

    The guy admitted it yet morons on here are still blaming Goodell? Goodell is doing his job which is why the owners overwhelminly put him back at that position because of the job he is doing.

    Take the whining somewhere else because the court of public opinion is for the Saint players and fans to man up like Loomis, Peyton, and Williams did. i cant wait for training camp when there is something new to discuss and this sniveling gets shoved to curb.

  35. noeffinway says: Jun 22, 2012 9:44 PM

    So many of you people commenting are just really really dense.

  36. santolonius says: Jun 22, 2012 9:44 PM

    it’s been a long time coming since this story broke last winter, but i now 100% do not believe the nfl is correct in its characterization of the bounties. the problem isn’t that goodell is judge, jury and executioner, as has often been said. the problem is that he is d.a., judge, jury and executioner. there is a distinction. goodell constructed the case against the saints as a prosecutor. and now he turns around and hears his own case. he cannot be objective as judge and jury when deciding if the prosecutor brought a good case without being open to seeing that he stinks as a prosecutor. and who can be that objective? no one.
    bottom line: i believe the players’ version of events.

  37. brady100 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:47 PM

    We have clearance, Clarence. Roger, Roger. What’s our vector, Victor?

  38. citizenstrange says: Jun 22, 2012 9:47 PM

    Goodell is drunk with power. He fined James Harrison thousands and thousands of dollars just for playing football and suspended Roethlisberger — with NO CHARGES OR CONVICTIONS— for four games and got away with it and now he thinks he can just do whatever the eff he wants.

  39. csmit44 says: Jun 22, 2012 9:48 PM

    “And maybe the coaches/FO personnel confessing/admitting to the existence of the bounty program”

    for the freaking love…again NOT ONE MEMBER OF THE NEW ORLEANS SAINTS ADMITTED TO A BOUNTY SYSTEM

    NOT

    A

    SINGLE

    ONE

    But congrats on being duped by all the dramatic language ESPN carelessly threw around at the onset of this thing.

  40. drgreenstreak says: Jun 22, 2012 9:52 PM

    Scott Fujita is a bad actor, terrible liar and sub-par linebacker. His rep has been compromised at his own hand and mouth. Looks a fool, acts a fool. Definitely talks like a fool.

  41. paperlions says: Jun 22, 2012 9:54 PM

    The next player to tell the truth or to tell the same story twice in a row will be the first. I don’t necessarily think the punishments were appropriate, but it is clear that there was a bounty system….some lawyer just told the players that if they all recanted any incriminating statements, they could go with the deny, deny, deny strategy.

    Obviously, it didn’t seem that important to deny things when they thought they might get a slap on the wrist….suspensions come down instead and suddenly everyone recants.

  42. mnlittle says: Jun 22, 2012 9:57 PM

    I’m happy to see a couple of people standing up to Goodell this week. He’s gotten away with so much that he thinks that he can do anything that he wants. Too bad Jerry Jones doesn’t have a pair like Fujita!

  43. rajbais says: Jun 22, 2012 10:00 PM

    What the hell is Roger doing???

    Running a league without a plan or organization!!!

    He’s so paranoid he just gives random punishments left and right and is ruining his relationship with players!!!

    It’s so stupid that there have been no studies done on what leads to less denigration on the game’s integrity, prescribed penalties (i.e. an automatic 4 game suspensions for drugs) or the random, case-by-case basis punishment method (i.e. one year suspensions for Pacman Jones and Donte Stallworth, 8-game suspensions for Tank Johnson and Chris Henry)!!!

    Personally, I think that there should be prescribed penalties for as many scenarios as possible because the poster child methodology of Roger Goodell is not turning around players’ poor choices!!!!

    The reason is that there is no constant reminder with a repeated, but simple message!!! What ever was different and rare for someone else doesn’t apply to one player all the time!!! When you have a prescribed penalty system or mandatory law penalty people tend to do the wrong act less. In states, there are seat belt laws that say “Click it or Ticket” and laws for killing a construction worker with a vehicle (i.e. a mandatory 14 years in state like Illinois)!!! Those laws are not only frequently advertised, but they’re easy to remember!!!

    Even though there is no advertisement for drug resistance in the NFL there are constant news headlines that repeat the same punishment for a various number of players who violate the substance-abuse policy. The repeating news headlines are like implicit ads and if the 4-game suspensions are constantly repeated players will realize that they’ll lose 4 game check!!! Why lose one when it could be someone else’s one-year salary [i.e. Drew Brees' $16 million franchise tender = $941,176.471 x (16 games + 1 bye week); 1/17 of Brees' salary is Chad Ochocinco's full one-year salary]???

    Plus, the TV networks are making a mistake!!! Players watch these networks too and if people (including the ones working in the media) want these players to follow rules and laws what way can they be reminded??? A NFL Rule(s) PSA. That shouldn’t be frowned upon because younger ones are watching and we’re now hearing about so many NCAA athletes getting arrested!!! Shouldn’t they be set to same standards like their heroes??? They might as well because arrests lower draft stocks dramatically!!!

    Look at Janoris Jenkins and Ryan Mallett!!!

    Roger Goodell was at one point making Paul Tagliabue’s legacy look bad!!! Now, it should be the other way around because Tagliabue largely contributed in making this America’s sport right after Major League Baseball’s 1994 season cancellation!!! During his years he rarely often cared about what people thought!!! Now Roger thinks too much and is largely contributing to the off-season being noise making season and the players resenting him even more when the NFL and NFLPA should at least be cordial working partners!!!

  44. j0esixpack says: Jun 22, 2012 10:01 PM

    Spygate all over again.

    This is Rogers’s M.O.

    The fans may have been ignorant that Rogers’s rules allowed signal taping from the stands and only prohibited sideline taping since 2006, but Roger knew it.

    That didn’t stop him from acting like Spygate was the sports crime of the century and gullible fans ate it up.

    Now we’re finding that Roger Goodell* might be exaggerating the nature of the “crime” once again.

  45. kingkornkahn says: Jun 22, 2012 10:01 PM

    Strange when players are more articulate than coaches and commishoners. I guess that’s what happens when everyone lawyers up…. A linebacker becomes the voice of reson.

  46. shian11 says: Jun 22, 2012 10:01 PM

    Continue to miss the point that there punishments were also for lying and being deceitful during the investigation 3 years prior!!! So mr. Fajita, let’s call it like it is– u broke the rules, your organization was warned and told to stop! You and your team did not and then lied about it. Don’t forget to call it like it is!! Right??

  47. shian11 says: Jun 22, 2012 10:04 PM

    “To be clear, if the nfl can penalize players WITHOUT proving an intent to injure, two things become evident. First, fujita admitted guilt under that rubric. Second, and more importantly, because this has been happening “when [he] was a young player,” he may have just sparked a new, covert investigation into the former head coaches and defensive coordinators for fujita’s previous teams. That includes the Kansas City Chiefs from 2002–2004, the Dallas Cowboys in 2005, and maybe the Cleveland Browns.”

    The Cleveland browns? Pay for performance must have not been paid out often.

  48. bigbadal21 says: Jun 22, 2012 10:05 PM

    Scott left out one small detail. The coaches and the team lied about the pay for performance when first investigated and still kept doing it. What choice did Goodell have?

  49. danetow says: Jun 22, 2012 10:05 PM

    Fujita said. ”Is it against the rules? Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules,”

    and then,

    So for someone to say ‘just take your medicine and move on,’ my response is no. If you’re accused of something you didn’t do, and they were going to not only ruin your reputation,”

    So he admits to doing something against the rules, but then goes on to say that he is being wrongfully accused of breaking the rules?

  50. bullcharger says: Jun 22, 2012 10:06 PM

    Pay for performance vs. Pay to injure is a technicality. They broke the payment rules and Williams was clearly telling them to injure guys. it doesn’t matter if they successfully injured guys or they personally wanted to injure guys. They were instructed to injure other players by Williams and they put money into that program. We can argue the length of the suspensions, but the players do deserve to be punished.

  51. lbrad413 says: Jun 22, 2012 10:13 PM

    Do half of you guys that post comments on here even read the article??? I know it’s beneficial to most of your teams that the saints get the book thrown at them but the fact is the NFL is making this something that it isn’t.. And that is something fans of all teams should be against..

  52. vontazemebro says: Jun 22, 2012 10:14 PM

    “What the hell are you doing, Roger?”

    NFL Films is rolling cameras on this I hope. :) Come on…they call the show “Hard Knocks”. But not too hard and not too soft right?

  53. butthatmakestoomuchsense says: Jun 22, 2012 10:14 PM

    FinFan68 says: Not a smart way to talk to the Commissioner. Especially since he is the guy you are trying to get to change his mind on your punishment, no less.

    The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

    Before today, in every appeal hearing Goodell had been treated with great cordiality and respect, yet he has never overturned a suspension on appeal. Never, not even once.

    Maybe it’s time a player tried something else.

  54. charitymike says: Jun 22, 2012 10:19 PM

    WOW..the haters are out in full force tonight huh? Guess there nothing else to do since you get to stay up for an extra hour because its the weekend.

  55. achamarro1 says: Jun 22, 2012 10:19 PM

    Do some of you even read the article. He said he was wrong for tbe pay for performance and has no problem with the punishment based on that, he is mad cuz he is bbeing portrayed as something he wasnt. It wasn’t a pay gor injury. Thats that. Now you all have real problems to deal with…..like stopping my Leo’s. Hail MEGATRON

  56. charitymike says: Jun 22, 2012 10:20 PM

    nflpasux says:
    Jun 22, 2012 9:21 PM
    whimpering like a schoolgirl!
    ____________________________________

    You would know huh.

  57. jm91rs says: Jun 22, 2012 10:24 PM

    voicefreason says:
    Jun 22, 2012 8:58 PM
    Man-up and take your lickings instead of trying to hide all this in litigation. Saint’s cheated and for that they have an Empty Title. Live with it.

    ———————————————-

    Vikings fan I take it? Why is it that they are the only ones that keep talking about the Super Bowl they didn’t play in?

  58. ascensionparish says: Jun 22, 2012 10:29 PM

    While Fujita admits to pooling money towards a pay for performance programs, he also concedes that this has been a part of his NFL experience since he was a player first coming out (Cowboys, Chiefs). Yet no investigation went beyond the Saints. So how would you Cowboys and Chiefs fans feel if your team were punished like the Saints have been. And let’s not end with the Cowboys and Chiefs. Let’s take a look at all the other teams where a pay for performance program existed. Don’t be so naive.

  59. archetypeobscure says: Jun 22, 2012 10:40 PM

    What really happened…

    Scott: What the hell are you doing, Roger?

    Roger: Hey, Scotty, if I was gonna break your balls, I’d tell you to go home and get your shine box.

  60. ravenator says: Jun 22, 2012 10:58 PM

    Caught with your pants down

  61. saintsfan26 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:03 PM

    Lets just call it like it is. The saints got punished for getting paid bonuses for playing LEGAL FOOTBALL. Period.

  62. mwindle1973 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:05 PM

    Fujita said…”You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing — and it becomes a perfect storm, and also it comes at a time politically when I think the league was looking for something like this.”

    ——————————————–

    Read the part that says he admits to throwing in some money for big plays. That’s all you need there. Every keeps saying where’s the proof on Fujita…try to get the simplicity of this…he has over and over stated that he contributed money to the program. I don’t care if it was for big plays or breaking legs, it’s hard to make the judgement and that’s why your not allowed to do either. He says he didn’t know it was against the rules…that has to be a lie. Why was he hiding his behavior, why didn’t he talk about the Saints great pay for performance program and how it made them all such better players.

  63. nflfan555 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:09 PM

    I thought, of all the Saints players accused in this scandal, this guy was kind of bright, but come on we admit pay for performance… then you watch the Saints v Packers video, they are all excited when they (Saints players) thought that they broke Bret Farve’s leg – even shouting “show me the money” So even if words are just words. The body language and excitement you showed for thinking you broke the guys leg is really sick stuff. Very disappointed in you Mr Fajita your full of yourself and crap!

  64. bshuclassof2012 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:12 PM

    mjkelly77 says:
    Jun 22, 2012 9:11 PM
    “So, it’s unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that a lot of players have been dragged into it when the reality is it’s just a kind of loose, joking around, performance-type system of motivation coupled with some really, really inappropriate language that I’m sensitive to, but again, it is just language.”
    __________________

    Tell that to the widow of Darryl Stingley.

    ____________________________________
    There wasn’t a bounty on Darryl Stingley. Jack Tatum paralyzed him on what was then considered a legal hit, and granted made the situation wholeheartedly uglier by refusing to apologize to him on his death bed. He was not murdered, he was injured playing a game that has a high inherent risk involved. A pay-for-performance program is in stark contrast to a pay-for-injure program, and doesn’t have a place in today’s NFL. But back in the Tatum/Stingley days that’s just what they did, as it was within the framework of the rules.

  65. secretbonus1 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:13 PM

    The confrontational attitude reals of guilt. The innocent don’t have to go out of their way to attack others. They don’t have to deflect the attention away from them and put it on the other person… HUUUUuge sign of guilt.

  66. ghostofnflpresent says: Jun 22, 2012 11:14 PM

    *Saints

  67. geauxjay says: Jun 22, 2012 11:15 PM

    Another case of haters hearing what they wanted to hear. Fajita says that under the table performances are technically illegal, so therefore his punishment for participating in a BOUNTY PROGRAM is justified.

    That’s like a cop pulling you over and accusing you of possession, and you go to jail even though he can’t prove it, because you admitted you were speeding.

  68. geauxjay says: Jun 22, 2012 11:17 PM

    *performance bonuses*–sorry

  69. secretbonus1 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:18 PM

    Despite all the alleged “slandering” of a persons name and reputation, not one person has even discussed about the possibility of suing the NfL or the commissioner. Why? Because they don’t want further investigation and attention into their actions because they know they did something wrong….
    At least it appears that way, now get off the ants nads

  70. mtrhead269 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:27 PM

    Stay classy Scott.

    What was Goodell doing? Enforcing league rules.

    Might want to read them, any compensation outside the cap is iLLegal, ask Debartolo and Policy how that works out.

    Hope the ppl that recieved the money paid taxes on it.

    Smile when you get the IRS letter.

    LMFAO

  71. cballlv11 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:28 PM

    “The bad news is that it’s too late to put the bounty toothpaste back in the tube. The Saints were painted as a marauding gang of Gilloolys in March; calling it what it really was in June will do nothing to change the perception that has been cemented into the public’s collective consciousness.”

    Let’s be clear on this… A large chunk of fans don’t think this is as big of a deal as it’s been made out to be, and a lot don’t care at all. A REALLY large chunk of fans wish this was just over so they won’t have to listen to this reality show garbage anymore…

  72. bucfandango says: Jun 22, 2012 11:30 PM

    I’ve never been a Fujita fan, but I sure am now. I believe him. I believe he called it exactly as he saw it, and what he says finally makes some sense. He did what he was told. He bought in and did what he has always done, but not to the extent of injury as it has been alleged. I believe if he was lying that he never would have admitted to anything. Roger should just call it “Conduct Unbecoming” and find a compromising way to end this whole thing now. Make the deal, and make it go away. As stated there’s 3 sides to every story and it sounds like the truth is starting to come out.

  73. hbraiwick says: Jun 22, 2012 11:31 PM

    All players have agreed too a pay for performance program, not a pay for injure program. I think all involved have said that they would accept that discipline, but not for something that the NFL is portraying this to be. It is all about timing and this is about the league protecting themselves from future lawsuits from former players. Kind of funny that suddenly we don’t see the shows promoted BY the NFL bragging about big hits in games. You think that’s coincidence…no way. They are suddenly protecting their rear end, scurrying to cover all their bases. Secondly, this is football! These players & coaches & the NFL know good and well of the risks of playing a violent sport. Pretty soon we’ll be watching the THTL…the two-hand touch league!!! Let’s be real here…the fans here sitting on their high horse saying that they don’t watch football and say “take em out or put his @$$ pin the ground” come on people!!! Obviously when we say that were would never want anyone to have a debilitating injury or sustain a horrendous career ending injury. This to me is not what they wasn’t want either. Imho….the penalties were abnoxious & there was nothing in the field of play to give substance to the claims! Saints defense was not even close to elite.

  74. nflofficeadmin says: Jun 22, 2012 11:37 PM

    Oh Roger!

  75. zn0rseman says: Jun 22, 2012 11:45 PM

    We’ve all heard the defense meeting that Williams gave before the 49ers playoff game where he tells his guys to take out Crabtree’s ACL and to taret another player’s head because he is recovering from a concussion.

    We’ve all seen the 2009 NFC Championship game where Favre was blasted with a huge number of illegal hits that only a fool would say weren’t intended to cause injury.

    We all know that Sean Payton admitted to the bounty program.

    We all know Greg Williams admitted to the bounty program.

    Former Saints players have admitted that there was a bounty program.

    We all know that the Saint’s bounty program paid out for things hey referred to as “knock outs” and “cart offs”.

    Yet there is still a segment of football fans out there who actually believe that the Saints players NEVER intended to hurt anyone. They were just playing hard and really, all that talk about ACL’s and cart offs was just code words for wrapping up an making textbook tackles.

    Please.

    Wake up and smell what you’re shoveling. These players deserved every but of their suspensions and then some. Frankly, I think they are getting off light.

  76. ftcsubs says: Jun 22, 2012 11:47 PM

    we didnt mean it like we were paying for cart offs. no one ever got money for that. we were just joking about injuring my fellow players in the league and possibly ending their careers. just because it says we put up money for taking a player out. we really didnt mean it. we knew we were breaking the law that you repeatedly told us not to do. sounds like a five year old telling his mom it wasnt me who broke the vase.how dumb do these players think we are. they were warned to knowck it of. they lied about it. why do you thijnk hardgrove got 8 games he lied to the commish. just like when you lie to your daddy you get more punishment. it may not have been him, but it probably was, that said show me the money. but he was in earshot of hearing it. and him telling the commish he knew nothing about a program is complete BS. the nfl wants nothing more to sweep this under the rug like spygate when they warned them before. but with everyone sueing the NFL for violence what is roger suppose to do. the players think its no big deal is why they are upset about it. they are numb to the situation. whats the big deal i put 10 k up to take some one out of the game, they think it has nothing to do with the nfl and just a little side action fun.

  77. thcnote says: Jun 22, 2012 11:49 PM

     You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing
    —————–
    You mean big plays like knocking a QB out of the game? Someone should tell you to just shut up.

  78. brenenostler says: Jun 22, 2012 11:52 PM

    All of this really is making me respect Goodell more and more. He could easily be bad-mouthing the players the way they’re doing it to him. Gotta give him props for staying classy through all this.

  79. saintij says: Jun 22, 2012 11:56 PM

    Yeah Yeah Yeah… “take that …take that…take that”…

    ok take this questionable suspension cause we said so.

    nice!

  80. lostsok says: Jun 22, 2012 11:58 PM

    Maybe if the Saints had obfuscated and lied for 2-3 years…Goodall wouldn’t have brought the hammer down on them. They spent that time shrugging him off as being of no concern to them–they were the Almight Saints after all–and now they’re all wah, wah, wah, it’s not fair.

    Bummer.

    Stop acting like criminals and you’ll stop being treated like criminals.

    No pity here. Zero. Nada. None.

  81. steviaquinn says: Jun 23, 2012 12:01 AM

    The real question is “what the hell are you doing, Scott Fujita and why arent you in jail?”

  82. randylaheytpb says: Jun 23, 2012 12:03 AM

    The whole issue of the “bounty system” is foggy, but he just admitted to breaking the rules.

    He deserves to be in trouble for breaking the rules AND for being so stupid as to say so in such a vitriolic environment.

    Dummie

  83. jnicholson510 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:04 AM

    Oh he bad

  84. steviaquinn says: Jun 23, 2012 12:05 AM

    This is turning into the OJ trial. Everyone is guilty as hell yet they lawyers are trying to muddy the waters and there are many OJs pretending the glove doesn’t fit.

  85. tarheelpirate says: Jun 23, 2012 12:07 AM

    Bounties or no bounties, Scott Fujita has been a dirty player for a long time.

  86. 14fairways says: Jun 23, 2012 12:08 AM

    A couple of you guys don’t get it – this isn’t about Godell punishing these players for this act, this is all about setting a legal precidence for the NFL lawyers to use in the concussion lawsuit, i.e. “… it’s not the game and the rules that caused head injuries, it’s the players and former players themselves who played outside the rules.”

    All of Godell’s actions, all the head hit-related player fines, all the “tag football” joke stuff, is aimed to protect the future of the NFL, so the NFL doesn’t end up like the old asbestos businesses, which have all been sued out of business.

    I love the controlled violence of the game and hate to see it disappearing, but if you love football and hope to be watching it 10-20 years from now, you ought to be hoping Godell is successful.

  87. 6thsense79 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:10 AM

    clickablecontent says:Jun 22, 2012 9:00 PM

    “You couple that with some guys who occasionally throw in some money for big plays — which I have admitted to doing…”

    And there is the rub: Non-contract bonuses violate league rules. Here is Fujita publicly admitting to it. This is a suspension. Simple.

    Has everyone lost sight of that amidst all this bounty business?
    —————————————
    Well than please tell that to the NFL because that’s not how they characterized the reason for handing down these unprecedented punishments. Maybe people lost sight amidst all this bounty business because the league fogged up and distorted this whole issue.

  88. genericuser8888 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:10 AM

    I can’t believe the comments here. Some of you people are either partially illiterate or downright fools, because you are completely missing the point.

    The players all admitted to a pay for performance program. The program included big hits that psychologically intimidated the opponent. These were called “kill the head” hits. Vilma had 62 or 64 of them. Do you really think he handed out 64 injuries in 2009? No. He didn’t. Every player from high school on up is taught to hit the opposing player AS HARD AS HE POSSIBLY CAN. If you don’t believe that, you are living in denial or some lala land of football. Hell, NO PLAYER was carted off due to a Saints hit in 2009!

    The commissioner comes out and does a BIG MEDIA BLITZ saying that the players were running a pay to injure program. This program did not exist. The coaches and Vilma are being punished as though a pay to injure scheme existed, even though it did not.

    I’m a Saints fan. My team deserves some punishment for the pfp program. But, they don’t deserve punish for a pay for injury program in the manner that the league has characterized and handed out punishments.

    Therefore, I hope that Vilma, the players, and anyone else who wants to sues the commish for defamation and wins. The players and coaches are getting royally screwed. It’s not even the punishments necessarily – it’s the way the league has publicly said that these guys did something that they did not do. [b]That’s Fujita’s point. If you want to punish him for pay for performance, then fine. But don’t tell the world that he was a pay to injure ringleader when there was no pay to injure program. [/b]

  89. thejuddstir says: Jun 23, 2012 12:11 AM

    “Fujita also addressed the merits of the situation, echoing the notion that the Saints had a pay-for-performance system coupled with tough talk but no deliberate intent to injure.”
    —————————————————–
    sounds like Fujita is now trying to put lipstick on the pig !
    I say it’s time the media and everyone else (except twisted Stain’s fans) put this story behind them , goodell rules the suspensions stand and we move forward with someone football. I think we have heard every excuse, every spin, every denial, and every explanation of what it was that took place………I think we all KNOW what took place and we’re tired of the b.s. that comes out of the state of Louisiana

  90. andrewfbrowne says: Jun 23, 2012 12:13 AM

    The thing I do not get about this and I have read just about every article on this I can, it says the players are saying it was a pay for performance program and not a bounty program. It rewarded big plays, and they say it is semantics.

    Here is my issue with what they are saying, apart from the fact that pay for performance is illegal in and of itself, the part I have a program is that the big plays that were rewarded often had to do with guys getting hurt on the other team.

    How do you get around that fact? I am really trying to see it from the players side, but I cannot wrap my head around that fact. They rewarded guys who hurt other players. They got off on it, called it motivation. You can say pay for performance if it helps you salvage your reputation and you can talk tough in the media, but it really looks a lot like a bounty program that is being spun as a pay for performance motivation tool.

  91. demolition510 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:14 AM

    So pretty much……

    NFL says there were bounties

    Players say it was pay for performance.

    Semantics folks.

    Some say its the same thing. Other say its different.

    IMO if these “bonuses” weren’t built into your contract, aren’t being paid legally by your employee and comes at the cost of intent to injure then these players are in the wrong.

    Can’t wait for football season to start.

  92. goredskins11 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:20 AM

    I keep reading these comments stating things like, “what he did was wrong so just shut up and pay the price”, and it simply amazes me how so many people cans be so dense. I think Fujita explains himself perfectly if you actually take the time to read the article instead of jumping to conclusions and spewing meaningless garbage in the comments section. He said that he knows that pay-for-performance is wrong and if he has to take his medicine for that he will gladly do so. BUT, a pay-for-injury scheme is completely different when it comes to the moral issues revolved around it. Being accused of participating in that kind of behavior is what Fujita is denying and fighting to correct that miss-categorization. And so far, the evidence we have seen leans his way regarding that. We all know that Williams’ speeches where out of line and went beyond what is acceptable, but there is no proof that it was taken seriously on the field and there has been no proof that anyone was paid or intended to be paid for illegal/dirty hits.

  93. 6thsense79 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:28 AM

    samel2003 says:Jun 22, 2012 9:17 PM

    “Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules, but that’s the way it was done when I was a young player and I’m not ashamed of that.”

    This is a PRIME example why, if you are charged with anything, be it criminal or anything else, you don’t speak anything, no matter how innocuous it seems at the time. You have hired counsel who Should be your advocate.

    To be clear, if the nfl can penalize players WITHOUT proving an intent to injure, two things become evident. First, fujita admitted guilt under that rubric. Second, and more importantly, because this has been happening “when [he] was a young player,” he may have just sparked a new, covert investigation into the former head coaches and defensive coordinators for fujita’s previous teams. That includes the Kansas City Chiefs from 2002–2004, the Dallas Cowboys in 2005, and maybe the Cleveland Browns.

    Stay tuned. Same bat time, same bat issue.
    —————————-
    Interesting that you chose to leave out exactly what Fujita admitted to in your partial quote of Fujita. Well here is the full quote:

    “People said I was stupid for confessing to paying for big plays. I didn’t think of that as a big deal,” Fujita said. ”Is it against the rules? Technically, yeah, it’s against the rules, but that’s the way it was done when I was a young player and I’m not ashamed of that. If that’s what I’m going down for, let’s call it for what it is. The problem is that the league has billed this thing as being this super-organized pay-to-injure scheme, which it never was.

    So essentially Fujita is saying he’s willing to accept the punishment for participating in a pay for performance program but not the punishment for a bounty program because he vehemently denies that. It seems like it’s something so hard for you to even comprehend and it’s really not that hard or complicated.

    If I willingly drive wrecklessly while sober doing 75mph against a speed limit of 55mph…get caught and charged with drunk driving….why would I admit to drunk driving and its punishment when I know I didn’t? Heck I may even go to court and plead guilty to speeding…..but I would never go to court and plead guilty to the more serious charge of drunk driving along with its more severe punishment.

  94. golions1 says: Jun 23, 2012 12:43 AM

    Q: What are you doing Roger?
    A: Suspending your smart a$$ Fujita.

  95. stellarperformance says: Jun 23, 2012 12:50 AM

    Well spoken. But it is all just too close to the truth to go unpunished.

  96. hbraiwick says: Jun 23, 2012 12:51 AM

    Totally agree with you Skins fan…well said.

    I’m more disturbed with the yo-yo making comments about Louisiana. That is totally out of line. I’m proud to be from New Orleans…I’m a proud female Saints fan. I have lived in other states & have always carried myself a respectable manner & with southern hospitality. It was extremely uncalled for back in 2005, when people made comments like “New Orleans isn’t worth rebuilding” as if simple humanity doesn’t exist. The comment you made is completely disrespectful. Hmmm…sounds like painting a broad by brush is a very popular term these days.

    On a football note, I would personally LOVE for us to once again stand together, prove everyone wrong, & watch my team host the Lombardi in the air…oh & in the Dome with RG handing it over. Isn’t that what every fan wants for their team. Maybe a long shot, but it would be quite humorous. Who Dat!!!!!

  97. hbraiwick says: Jun 23, 2012 12:56 AM

    Sorry for the misspellings. New phone with slide keypad, not because I’m from Louisiana. Just thought I would clarify.

  98. wunsa says: Jun 23, 2012 1:00 AM

    andrewfbrowne says: Jun 23, 2012 12:13 AM

    The thing I do not get about this and I have read just about every article on this I can, it says the players are saying it was a pay for performance program and not a bounty program. It rewarded big plays, and they say it is semantics.

    Here is my issue with what they are saying, apart from the fact that pay for performance is illegal in and of itself, the part I have a program is that the big plays that were rewarded often had to do with guys getting hurt on the other team.

    How do you get around that fact? I am really trying to see it from the players side, but I cannot wrap my head around that fact. They rewarded guys who hurt other players. They got off on it, called it motivation. You can say pay for performance if it helps you salvage your reputation and you can talk tough in the media, but it really looks a lot like a bounty program that is being spun as a pay for performance motivation tool.
    _____________________________

    You need to stop taking what the league and ESPN say at face value. Often had to do with guys getting hurt on the other team? Really? Show me one instance where a Saints player injured an opponent and got paid for it. I’m hearing crickets…know why? Because it didn’t happen.

    The one play cited by the league…where Harper got paid for a “cart off” on Jacobs in the 2009 Giants game…turns out to be completely false. Sharper, not Harper made the tackle – a clean legal hit on a RB carrying the ball – and Jacobs was only out 2-3 plays before playing the rest of the game.

    No other evidence of any payment for injury has ever been offered by the league. And the one they cited turns out to be a complete LIE.

    If you don’t agree prove me wrong.

  99. paulitik74 says: Jun 23, 2012 1:01 AM

    The sense of entitlement and victimization of the Saints fans, players, and organization never ceases to amaze me.

  100. ranksarot says: Jun 23, 2012 1:12 AM

    Fujitsu clearly didn’t learn anything from O J. That is, even in the face of overwhelming evidence: deny, deny, deny. Now he has gone and admitted everything… Wilma was probably thinking “oh no he didn’t” meanwhile knowing they are all doomed now…

  101. calv23 says: Jun 23, 2012 1:45 AM

    It’s the new “Say it aint so, Joe”

  102. silentcount says: Jun 23, 2012 1:48 AM

    For all of the self-rightious lynch mob, if Goodell suspended all players for pay for hard hits, he’d be suspending half the players on every team, including yours. The issue here is about fairness. Don’t say hang Fajita unless you’re willing to hang guys are your team, too. There’s a good reason why no defensive player on any team has pointed a finger at the Saints.

  103. musicman495 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:00 AM

    bullcharger says: Jun 22, 2012 10:06 PM

    Pay for performance vs. Pay to injure is a technicality.
    ———–
    Only for those who do not understand English. You really think there is no difference between paying a guy to sack the QB, or tackle the punt returner inside the 20, and paying him to break someone’s leg? Not to mention that the Saints DOCKED a player money from the pool when he was penalized or fined for a hit. Goodell’s charges do not pass the smell test.

  104. mjkelly77 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:06 AM

    Deb says:Jun 22, 2012 9:15 PM

    The film should tell the tale on the players. If they weren’t flagged and fined for dirty hits then, the NFL has no case against them now. The coaches/GM were punished for organizing the bounty program. That should be the end of it. The league has no reason to pursue the Saints players.
    ______________

    And by extension, the Nazis were “just following orders”.

  105. cmcm2k says: Jun 23, 2012 2:08 AM

    Y’all are starting to remind me of the 911 conspiracy theorists. You take little anecdotal pieces of evidence and convince yourselfs that it makes sense that its all a conspiracy.

    Do you really think the NFL has some weird motive to target the Saints, and only the Saints?? They were the NFL posterboys a few years ago.

    Sadly for the people who revealed the evidence, they’re probably going to be identified and people will know to never rat again.

    Again, when you think with an 110 IQ or above, you realize the NFL has better things to do then prosecute the innocent Saints

  106. musicman495 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:09 AM

    mtrhead269 says: Jun 22, 2012 11:27 PM

    Stay classy Scott.

    What was Goodell doing? Enforcing league rules.
    ————————————
    Which rules were those? The salary cap rules? The Pay to Injure Rules? The Pay for Performance Rules? Or the Kiss the Commissioner’s Keister Rules? You cannot say you are punishing players for running a pay for injure program, produce no evidence of it, then change your story and say you are now punishing them for circumventing the salary cap and lying to investigators. Stop moving the goal posts. If they did not do it, maybe they weren’t lying.

  107. cmcm2k says: Jun 23, 2012 2:12 AM

    Also Florio, Greg Williams gets the most severere sentence of anybody and cooperates……..alll for a big plays program???

  108. musicman495 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:13 AM

    steviaquinn says: Jun 23, 2012 12:05 AM

    This is turning into the OJ trial. Everyone is guilty as hell yet they lawyers are trying to muddy the waters and there are many OJs pretending the glove doesn’t fit.
    ———————————-
    Actually, it appears there is no glove at all. It is hard to muddy that.

  109. mjkelly77 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:22 AM

    bshuclassof2012 says:Jun 22, 2012 11:12 PM

    mjkelly77 says:
    Jun 22, 2012 9:11 PM
    “So, it’s unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that a lot of players have been dragged into it when the reality is it’s just a kind of loose, joking around, performance-type system of motivation coupled with some really, really inappropriate language that I’m sensitive to, but again, it is just language.”
    __________________

    Tell that to the widow of Darryl Stingley.

    ____________________________________
    There wasn’t a bounty on Darryl Stingley. Jack Tatum paralyzed him on what was then considered a legal hit, and granted made the situation wholeheartedly uglier by refusing to apologize to him on his death bed. He was not murdered, he was injured playing a game that has a high inherent risk involved. A pay-for-performance program is in stark contrast to a pay-for-injure program, and doesn’t have a place in today’s NFL. But back in the Tatum/Stingley days that’s just what they did, as it was within the framework of the rules.
    _______________

    It was a worthless exhibition game that essentially cost a man his life. Read “They Call Me Assassin” for some insight. Tatum’s intent was to hurt people.

  110. packhawk04 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:30 AM

    After punishments were handed down- “we accept full responsibility for these serious violations.”

    “There is no place in football for BOUNTY programs, and we reiterate that this will never happen again.”

    That was excerpts of the saints statement. Please notice they essentially admitted a bounty system.

  111. sf944 says: Jun 23, 2012 2:43 AM

    Some months ago Bruschi admitted they (players, not coaches) paid for big plays (sack, FF) in the Patriots.

  112. nyfcat says: Jun 23, 2012 2:54 AM

    Everything Fujita, Vilma, Smith, and Hargrove say through the media says: YOU CANT PROVE IT.

    ..instead of…

    “WE”RE INNOCENT!!!”

  113. jacksprat57 says: Jun 23, 2012 3:00 AM

    mjkelly77: Stingley never once claimed that it was a dirty hit. He grew to be bitter about Tatum in later years because Jack never so much as expressed regret, nor even once manned up and came to Darryl.

    Jack was a tool, but the hit was only unique (at the time) in its devastating effect.

  114. jacksprat57 says: Jun 23, 2012 3:12 AM

    goredskins11: Some of them are just exactly that dense. Most of them are massively indifferent to injustice. Not a small number of them are brightening their little corner of the world by burning candles made from the rendered fat of those whom they envy.

  115. ruggerlad says: Jun 23, 2012 3:13 AM

    Roger Goodell has made the game worse every year, time for him to go was a couple years ago.

  116. ampking101 says: Jun 23, 2012 3:35 AM

    Thank god some people are finally realizing and posting. The pay-for-performance system also paid out for “knockouts” and “cart-offs” which were essentially paying someone to sideline a player for part of the game. Is that not an injury? Clean hit or not is that not considered paying for causing an injury.

    Fine they were clean hits, I’m happy the Saints weren’t making illegal hits. However they were still rewarding for sidelining players, as well as big hits, ints, etc. Which Fujita also mentioned was illegal (there is my proof winner2277, hope that clears it up for you). So no they weren’t being paid for illegal hits but they were paying for injuries to key players.

    I would love all teams (including my Atlanta Falcons, here’s looking at you Dunta Robinson) to be investigated for this. I thought the mentality was immoral when I played and I still think it is till this day.

  117. purplegreenandgold says: Jun 23, 2012 3:36 AM

    “The bad news is that it’s too late to put the bounty toothpaste back in the tube. The Saints were painted as a marauding gang of Gilloolys in March; calling it what it really was in June will do nothing to change the perception that has been cemented into the public’s collective consciousness.”
    ===================================
    yes i remember when pft caught that hook the nfl cast and all of you flapping in the water with stories posting every minute and haters and bandwagon haters were @ their best. then suddenly mike you said wait a minute something ain’t right here… there should be more compeling evidence than this ” lets see the evidence”.
    so yes it is too late “to put the toothpaste back in the tube”. the picture you painted was a masterpiece back in march with such vibrant strokes of confidence. everyone congratulating you on your brillance and yet you look upon your painting and start to see flaws. but you cant paint the picture again…there are no restarts…no do overs…all that can be done now is the nfl will say yes it existed and players will say it didnt and of course we will remember when the media were fish on a hook

  118. raqaiw says: Jun 23, 2012 3:39 AM

    hbraiwick says: Jun 23, 2012 12:51 AM

    Totally agree with you Skins fan…well said.

    I’m more disturbed with the yo-yo making comments about Louisiana. That is totally out of line. I’m proud to be from New Orleans…I’m a proud female Saints fan. I have lived in other states & have always carried myself a respectable manner & with southern hospitality. It was extremely uncalled for back in 2005, when people made comments like “New Orleans isn’t worth rebuilding” as if simple humanity doesn’t exist. The comment you made is completely disrespectful. Hmmm…sounds like painting a broad by brush is a very popular term these days.

    On a football note, I would personally LOVE for us to once again stand together, prove everyone wrong, & watch my team host the Lombardi in the air…oh & in the Dome with RG handing it over. Isn’t that what every fan wants for their team. Maybe a long shot, but it would be quite humorous. Who Dat!!!!!
    ___________________________________
    1) Most said NO wasn’t worth rebuilding because it was/is a town of mostly poor black people, and America’s history of dealing with those is spotty at best. Had it been Houston that was devastated by natural disaster, the FEMA trucks would’ve been parked in Conroe a week before the disaster happened.(Conroe is just north of Houston for the uninformed)
    2)Who dat? Roger Goodell dat!!!!!

  119. loboviking says: Jun 23, 2012 6:18 AM

    Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. Goodell showed signs of this prior to the signing of the new CBA and I am sure that one negotiating item, of not providing him authority to be judge, jury and executioner, is only beginning to be a point that should have been a cornerstone to the agreement the NFLPA signed. Unfortunately they can’t change it for 10 more years.

  120. LoCoSu@%s says: Jun 23, 2012 8:20 AM

    Rather juvenile, but I must confess I enjoyed it.

  121. billsfan1 says: Jun 23, 2012 8:38 AM

    i cant be certain of whether this was a pay for performance or bounty,but pictures speak 1000 words…The picture i think is most telling the idea that Gregg Williams has been silent through all of this. IF this was indeed a pay for performance benefit, which apparently goes on and has for a long time (whici i do not deny), then why isnt he making any noise. I have no doubt in my mind that Vilma did offer money to take Favre out ( i think this happens alot by many teams), but if isnt what the NFL says it is, why is Williams being quiet. Logic would dictate that he should be kicking and screaming of no wrong doing as the others are. Same goes for Payton. There should be litigation in some form on their behalf.

    I admit the league hasnt looked real good on this right now but what in God’s name would Coy Wire get from admitting this took place. I can understand players would come to his defense but why would players admit this took place.. they gain no benefit really.

    If i were the commish, i would willingly drop the case and suspensions if these players would sign consent forms that they would not join the ever growing civil suits against the NFL

  122. macker1283 says: Jun 23, 2012 9:33 AM

    Hilarious, Fujita just admits in this article that everything Goodell has claimed is correct, but his argument is that, “Its just not that big of a deal.”

  123. huffwx says: Jun 23, 2012 9:50 AM

    Not that this will get read, but he’s clearly upset that it’s labeled as a BOUNTY to INJURE.

  124. 3ghostninja says: Jun 23, 2012 10:16 AM

    I draw the line at intent to injure. I don’t have a problem at all with a payout for a big play, big legal hit, or a clutch play. That distinction needs to be made. Fujita needed to just focus on one idea. “I never took money to injure” and left it at that.

  125. goalie007 says: Jun 23, 2012 10:17 AM

    “What the hell are you doing, Scott?” That’s what I wonder every time I see him play for the Browns. He said that the NFL was running a smear campaign against him. I think he and his agent ran some sort of campaign to make the Browns think this injury-prone stiff could actually play. What a jackass …

  126. chickenneck says: Jun 23, 2012 11:05 AM

    “Hilarious, Fujita just admits in this article that everything Goodell has claimed is correct, but his argument is that, “Its just not that big of a deal.””

    ___________________________

    You cant really be that thick. Fujita is saying there was a pool for big plays, while goodell is saying there was a pool for intentionally inflicting injuries. There is such a huge difference.

  127. tulanekenny says: Jun 23, 2012 11:16 AM

    You guys are really dense. I keep reading statements about how fujita admitted to it then complains: How hard is it to get that all the evidence, all the confessions and etc admit to pay for performance not injury and there is a difference. a ticket for speeding and a ticket for assault and battery are two different things and should be. Fujita’s whole point, and all saints fans “crying” is that the saints have been punished for assault and batter (pay for injury) but only been proven to have been speeding (pay for performance). Both against the law, both deserving of punishment-but what the saints did wrong is the same thing the packers got caught doing: I suggest you look up packers and bounty on google…what happened in 2007. Yea the difference is the packers stopped when told to i understand that. But saints are still villified well beyond the wrong doing. even the NFL can’t be consistent. They had no problem with the giants admitting to head hunting kyle williams of the niners in the NFC championship game…their reasoning was that no on the field play proved they head hunted. Sorry but saints were one of the least penalized teams and least injure causing teams the past three years. So if on the field play became the proof as the NFL states…then yes…watch the video.

    Coming back to my normal point though: you would complain to the end of days if you were jailed for assault but only caught speeding…better hope guys like you arent the judge because you see no difference and its “only semantics”

  128. tulanekenny says: Jun 23, 2012 11:24 AM

    Hey billsfan, in response to your “why would he keep quiet question” I’m not saying I know either but here’s a logical answer: because he doesn’t have the same backing the players do with the NFLPA…yea they have a coaches union but its completely different. Saints players have anonymously stated that they want to voice their dissension and know the coaches do too, but can’t because the NFL basically has told them “keep quiet and we’ll make it easier on you”….williams wants back in the league so voicing that he didn’t admit to bounty, which he didn’t, and voicing that it was only P4P would practically assure that he would never, if he even had a chance before, coach again. Read Joe Vitts recent interview after the false 5K allegations came out. He said he’s kept quiet though he’s wanted to voice his opinion too but had to finally say something and call BS.

    I could be wrong but if williams ever wants to coach again, what’s a year or two out for keeping quiet and being able to make millions again in the future versus never being able to ever again

  129. goodolebaghead says: Jun 23, 2012 3:21 PM

    The reading comprehension levels for some of these posters that it scares the crap out of me some of you vote as well…

  130. al40110 says: Jun 23, 2012 4:14 PM

    He admits that he payed for big hits. (his words) I’m no lawyer but when someone admits wrongdoing they are guilty of wrongdoing. The fact others were doing it doesn’t make it right. He did wrong, admitted he did wrong. Now it’s time for him to act like a man and accept his punishment and move on.

  131. canuckinamerica says: Jun 23, 2012 4:18 PM

    “Is it against the rules? Technically, yeah”. That kind of says it all. If you can’t do the time (or suspension/fine), don’t do the crime.

  132. bigdevil830 says: Jun 23, 2012 10:57 PM

    The more the Saints and these guys complain the more guilty that look. He admitted that he broke the rules. It’s time for him, the rest of these guys and the Saints to accept the did wrong and go caught. and stop whinning about how wronged they have been!

  133. Deb says: Jun 23, 2012 11:10 PM

    mjkelly77 says:
    Jun 23, 2012 2:06 AM
    Deb says:Jun 22, 2012 9:15 PM

    The film should tell the tale on the players. If they weren’t flagged and fined for dirty hits then, the NFL has no case against them now. The coaches/GM were punished for organizing the bounty program. That should be the end of it. The league has no reason to pursue the Saints players.
    ______________

    And by extension, the Nazis were “just following orders”.

    ————————————————–

    Spare me the distorted Nazi analogies. I didn’t say the players aren’t responsible for their part in this sordid episode. But other than Vilma offering a $10,000 bounty on Favre–if there’s proof he did so–their part would consist of carrying out these supposed kill shots. Okay, so let’s see the film.

    If the Saints players were making dirty hits, I’m sure those hits were flagged and fined at the time. I’m sure of that because the league was flagging and fining everyone else. If officials didn’t flag and fine dirty hits by the Saints, then this time I demand an explanation. If they did flag and fine the Saints at the time, there’s no reason to punish them again now. And if the film doesn’t show any illegal hits, you’ve got no case against the players. Got it?

  134. ampking101 says: Jun 24, 2012 1:26 AM

    @Deb

    The one thing you are forgetting is that they weren’t punished for illegal hits, they were punished for financially rewarding for injuries. As my earlier post stated a pay-for-performance system that pays out for these “knockouts” and “cart-offs” (which were taking a players out of the game for anywhere from a few plays till the rest of the game) are paying for injuries. This was in fact admitted by the Saints about a week ago.

    So while they weren’t making illegal hits they were being rewarded for knockouts.

  135. jigga757 says: Jun 24, 2012 2:01 AM

    y didnt u have a bounty on dallas clark…he was burning u all night in the super bowl

  136. bcgreg says: Jun 24, 2012 10:21 AM

    @ patssaintsbroncoscheat

    Don’t forget about the niners and steelers too. Oh and the Cowboys, Chiefs and Buccaneers too.

  137. snowpea84 says: Jun 27, 2012 9:19 AM

    Players want to be able to sue the league after they are out for injuries and use safety as a bargaining chip during negotiations. Then they never shut their mouths when the league takes measures to promote player safety.
    You can’t have it both ways.

  138. dikshuttle says: Jun 28, 2012 7:44 AM

    I rarely see mention in this coverage of the motivations of the NFL in all this.

    Fujita’s pointed question seems rhetorical at first glance, but it definitely indicates the crux of the problem.

    The NFL has not been transparent in it’s purpose here. They list rationalizations, but give them no context.

    I have my beliefs on it, that they are desparately trying for any characterizations of concerns for player safety after decades of exploitations.

    But this is all old hat since at least North Dallas Forty.

    Goddell needs to come clean at some point.

  139. deeppurple23 says: Jun 28, 2012 10:23 PM

    First off, this is not a court of law, it is a business. Therefore, the level of evidence is much lower. Second of all Scott admits there was a “program” run by the team and that he contributed money. Then he wants to hide and claim that it was a “legal” bounty program.

    Walks like a duck scott…

    Man up, I thought you were a football player.

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